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Introduction and question

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  • Leunam
    Hello everyone, my name is Manuel and I live in Madrid, Spain. I m going to buy a piece of land and start something similar to a farm (I ve thinking in 4 Ha or
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 20, 2004
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      Hello everyone, my name is Manuel and I live in Madrid, Spain.

      I'm going to buy a piece of land and start something similar to a farm (I've
      thinking in 4 Ha or so), so I'm looking for information about it and found
      too much for me to process ;)

      I'm interested in permaculture and synergistic garden.
      About permaculture, I can't find books in Spain, about synergistic only
      found Larry's web, and now I'm printing many pdf's from ATTRA web (very
      interesting one).

      Would you kindly tell me where to find some practical information about
      permaculture and something more about Emilia's work?

      Thank you very much

      Manuel Iglesias
    • pollywog
      ... I would bet two of your best sources for Emelia s work and knowledge right now would be Gloria and Larry. You can also search the archives here for much
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 20, 2004
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        ---Hello Manuel!
        I would bet two of your best sources for Emelia's work and knowledge
        right now would be Gloria and Larry. You can also search the archives
        here for much input from her.

        I joined this group, to my loss, at the end of Emelia's time here.
        Having gone back through the archives here, and read what she has on
        Larry's site, I have grown to just adore that lady and her fine mind.
        Gloria had a wonderful personal relationship with her, and is always
        willing to share. Don't worry, soon as Gloria sees this from you, I'm
        sure you'll be hearing from her! Others, also, will be sharing
        resources for her work, too.

        You're going to do fine! deb

        In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Leunam" <m.iglesias@s...> wrote:
        > Hello everyone, my name is Manuel and I live in Madrid, Spain.

        > Would you kindly tell me where to find some practical information about
        > permaculture and something more about Emilia's work?
        >
        > Thank you very much
        >
        > Manuel Iglesias
      • Gloria C. Baikauskas
        Larry and Jamie have more of Emilia s notes. I don t really have that much anymore sadly. Computers going down does that. All I ever had was what Emilia
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 20, 2004
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          Larry and Jamie have more of Emilia's notes. I don't really have
          that much anymore sadly. Computers going down does that. All I ever
          had was what Emilia sent to me personally to assist me in 'spreading
          the word.'

          Her grace...and her enormous knowledge are so sorely missed
          here.....and in the world today.

          Manuel....before I forget....Welcome! If you will do a search of the
          messages on this group's homepage by clicking on Messages....then in
          the upper right corner where you have the opportunity to
          search....just put in Emilia. I would guess you will find a treasure
          there alone. Emilia was not one to hold back when she had something
          to say. <grins>

          What I think I got from Emilia more than anything else was the
          lecture....urging....to observe. She told me to sit down in the
          places I wanted to garden and just observe for as long a time as I
          could. Not to talk.....not to read....just to watch.

          At first I found myself a bit bored...kind of waiting for things to
          happen. Where's the magic? I can remember asking myself, as if a
          fairy would hit me on the head with a magic wand so I would see what
          Emilia was trying to tell me. Then I got it. I sat there in those
          places on different days quietly becoming almost a part of
          it...Nature...around me. I began to see more of what was happening
          there each day. I saw for the first time that my plan for garden
          beds was not as good as Nature's plan. The placing of things we
          humans configure is not always with the best of everything in mind
          that plants and their codependents need. We forget that the plants
          need friends like birds, and dragon flies, as well as bees, predatory
          beneficial insects, and such.....but Nature doesn't.

          You find yourself noticing where the water flows not just from a
          rain....but from any watering that you do yourself. It begins to
          tell you more and more as you watch it unfold. You see the when some
          plants need some protection from the heat of the day....begin to
          sense more. You begin to notice the interaction between weeds and
          what you may have planted. Plants we put in a place aren't so
          discriminatory as humans are towards 'weeds.' Emilia used to tell me
          to leave some weeds....because they help.

          I know I am going on and on....and I don't know if you think I am
          crazy....or bizarre. I just know that that is one 'gift' Emilia gave
          me. It doesn't tell you what to plant with what...followed by what
          in the first year....and the second....and so forth. Yet it was a
          big part of what she tried so hard to get me to see. Without it you
          will just go through the motions.

          Emilia could tell you where to place a water
          source....pond,etc.....and when to plant this and that. She knew so
          much more than maybe any of us through a lifetime of learning it
          herself. She was an amazing....and sometimes feisty....woman. Get
          to know her from her posts to this group. They are invaluable.

          Gloria, Texas
        • Leunam
          Thanks both of you, I m looking at the search engine, several thousands messages are waiting ;) Manuel ... From: Gloria C. Baikauskas
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 21, 2004
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            Thanks both of you, I'm looking at the search engine, several thousands
            messages are waiting ;)

            Manuel

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Gloria C. Baikauskas" <gcb49@...>
          • lucia@lrw.net
            I m trying to locate seeds for lincoln peas, which I ve heard grow well in the climate I m gardening in, NE US. does anyone here know of a source? I ve heard
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 26, 2004
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              I'm trying to locate seeds for lincoln peas, which I've heard grow well in
              the climate I'm gardening in, NE US.

              does anyone here know of a source? I've heard they are an heirloom variety
              but have not had any luck with any of the heirloom catalogs. the only
              place I've found is in Canada and by the time they arrive, it'll be too
              late to plant them here. I guess I started on this a bit late.

              otherwise - does anyone recommend another pea that grows well in the
              climate of the northeast US ?

              thanks - Lucia
            • MANDCRUSSELL@AOL.COM
              http://gurneys.com/product.asp?pn=14816 [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 27, 2004
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                http://gurneys.com/product.asp?pn=14816


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • MANDCRUSSELL@AOL.COM
                Lincoln peas from Guerney [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 27, 2004
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                  Lincoln peas from Guerney


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • pollywog
                  ... especially after getting established, can handle some rather icky temps and weather. I grow an indoor garden every year in my windows- no lights, and this
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 27, 2004
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                    ---Lucia, even if you get them "late", it will be worth it. Peas,
                    especially after getting established, can handle some rather icky
                    temps and weather.

                    I grow an indoor garden every year in my windows- no lights, and this
                    last year my indoor garden had to face hard freeze temps when the
                    furnace died for a few days. Peas died, (it got to less than 20*F for
                    a couple of days, fer Petes Sake!), but we still got good out of them.

                    Often, peas are such fast growers, one can still get a decent harvest
                    even when planted late in the growing season: at the least, you should
                    be able to get a few seeds for next year's use. I doubt it would be
                    that desperate, though. If you want, you can grow a portion in the
                    garden area, grow a couple of plants over the winter, and have seed
                    for the "appropriate" window of next year's planting time. Just
                    portion seed out for each area of use, or plant a few in a dedicated
                    nursery plot, for propagation material to be used later.

                    If you are late in season, peas clone (cutting, digging up) easily, if
                    carefully. You can grow yourself a mess over the winter, save what
                    seeds you can for next year, whatever. There's a great flex factor
                    there. Peas are just too easy. If it's a tendril pea, easier yet. All
                    peas will layer, tendril peas do so too easy for words.

                    My vote is, get them Lincolns now, no matter "season" timing, and
                    utilize those puppies. Heirlooms are lost because of timidity, way too
                    often.

                    And, bear in mind those of us who adore our heirlooms, and may be
                    willing to swap, even rare for rare. I might offer a trade later for
                    one of my Hillbilly Tomato clones, but don't bank on it. <G> Don't
                    worry, have other plants/seeds to offer, and may need to send them out
                    real fast, if the bosses decide to pull out those chemicals the
                    Matriarch is wanting to use. They own the land, they have final say. Ugh.

                    Hillbilly is being sent all over, though: Montana, Deleware, and
                    outside the continental U.S confines. I want this type, (and this
                    particular plant), to be heirloom in every sense- love my Hillbilly,
                    and he deserves to live for centuries! Boy has one helluva history,
                    and is one fellow deserving of long life and many years of
                    productivity. Any fine heirloom deserves the same, and keeping them in
                    one geographic/climactic area, reduces their chances for longevity.

                    Snag those peas! Save seeds well, or grow and save! Grow a portion,
                    save the rest! Flex! Flex!! "Recipe Adherent Progroms" are for those
                    with no soul and no imagination! <G>

                    Now, have said all that, but believe Lincolns may be not as rare as
                    you were told. Check the Shumway Catalog for this year, plenty
                    available. They are a rather popular heirloom, even before Shumway
                    started offering them again; although there are other, hybrid as well
                    as OP (as opposed to heirloom) types. No matter. If you have access, I
                    say snag 'em. {:) deb

                    In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, lucia@l... wrote:
                    > I'm trying to locate seeds for lincoln peas, which I've heard grow
                    well in
                    > the climate I'm gardening in, NE US.
                    >
                    > does anyone here know of a source? I've heard they are an heirloom
                    variety
                    > but have not had any luck with any of the heirloom catalogs. the only
                    > place I've found is in Canada and by the time they arrive, it'll be too
                    > late to plant them here.
                  • lucia@lrw.net
                    hi deb - thanks for your feedback! I called Gurney s they were out of stock. But Shumway s had some, plus some cranberries I m going to try out. we have alot
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 27, 2004
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                      hi deb - thanks for your feedback! I called Gurney's they were out of
                      stock. But Shumway's had some, plus some cranberries I'm going to try out.
                      we have alot of swampy land and blueberries dp well. so I figure the
                      cranberries will do well there too, and I love them blended raw with
                      soaked dates. mmmmm.

                      I'm rather new at this and everyone here has been so helpful.

                      I like your advise about ordering even if they come late. you're right and
                      I would have done that if shumway's didn't have any.

                      Lucia

                      <

                      On Tue, 27 Apr 2004, pollywog wrote:

                      > ---Lucia, even if you get them "late", it will be worth it. Peas,
                      > especially after getting established, can handle some rather icky
                      > temps and weather.
                      >
                      > I grow an indoor garden every year in my windows- no lights, and this
                      > last year my indoor garden had to face hard freeze temps when the
                      > furnace died for a few days. Peas died, (it got to less than 20*F for
                      > a couple of days, fer Petes Sake!), but we still got good out of them.
                      >
                      > Often, peas are such fast growers, one can still get a decent harvest
                      > even when planted late in the growing season: at the least, you should
                      > be able to get a few seeds for next year's use. I doubt it would be
                      > that desperate, though. If you want, you can grow a portion in the
                      > garden area, grow a couple of plants over the winter, and have seed
                      > for the "appropriate" window of next year's planting time. Just
                      > portion seed out for each area of use, or plant a few in a dedicated
                      > nursery plot, for propagation material to be used later.
                      >
                      > If you are late in season, peas clone (cutting, digging up) easily, if
                      > carefully. You can grow yourself a mess over the winter, save what
                      > seeds you can for next year, whatever. There's a great flex factor
                      > there. Peas are just too easy. If it's a tendril pea, easier yet. All
                      > peas will layer, tendril peas do so too easy for words.
                      >
                      > My vote is, get them Lincolns now, no matter "season" timing, and
                      > utilize those puppies. Heirlooms are lost because of timidity, way too
                      > often.
                      >
                      > And, bear in mind those of us who adore our heirlooms, and may be
                      > willing to swap, even rare for rare. I might offer a trade later for
                      > one of my Hillbilly Tomato clones, but don't bank on it. <G> Don't
                      > worry, have other plants/seeds to offer, and may need to send them out
                      > real fast, if the bosses decide to pull out those chemicals the
                      > Matriarch is wanting to use. They own the land, they have final say. Ugh.
                      >
                      > Hillbilly is being sent all over, though: Montana, Deleware, and
                      > outside the continental U.S confines. I want this type, (and this
                      > particular plant), to be heirloom in every sense- love my Hillbilly,
                      > and he deserves to live for centuries! Boy has one helluva history,
                      > and is one fellow deserving of long life and many years of
                      > productivity. Any fine heirloom deserves the same, and keeping them in
                      > one geographic/climactic area, reduces their chances for longevity.
                      >
                      > Snag those peas! Save seeds well, or grow and save! Grow a portion,
                      > save the rest! Flex! Flex!! "Recipe Adherent Progroms" are for those
                      > with no soul and no imagination! <G>
                      >
                      > Now, have said all that, but believe Lincolns may be not as rare as
                      > you were told. Check the Shumway Catalog for this year, plenty
                      > available. They are a rather popular heirloom, even before Shumway
                      > started offering them again; although there are other, hybrid as well
                      > as OP (as opposed to heirloom) types. No matter. If you have access, I
                      > say snag 'em. {:) deb
                      >
                      > In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, lucia@l... wrote:
                      > > I'm trying to locate seeds for lincoln peas, which I've heard grow
                      > well in
                      > > the climate I'm gardening in, NE US.
                      > >
                      > > does anyone here know of a source? I've heard they are an heirloom
                      > variety
                      > > but have not had any luck with any of the heirloom catalogs. the only
                      > > place I've found is in Canada and by the time they arrive, it'll be too
                      > > late to plant them here.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
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