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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Land rejuvenating

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  • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
    ... it depends of the type of plants planted some plants could not come thru a mulch too thick or too coarse ,i use some fine material like left over from
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 31, 2004
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      > When you plant something are you putting straw, or some other plant
      > material on top of the soil where you planted? If so.....how thick a
      > layer are we talking about?
      >
      it depends of the type of plants planted some plants could not come thru a
      mulch too thick or too coarse ,i use some fine material like left over from
      seed cleaning or shreded leaves and use just enough for the soil to not look
      bare .seeing bare soil just hurt me i don't like to see the soil drying out
      because of the sun or splashing away with the rain falling .
      jean-claude
    • Adam Carter
      Hi Ernie, One thing that you should look into is the edibility of any of the weeds that currently grow in your land. I ve been really surprised about how many
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 2, 2004
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        Hi Ernie,

        One thing that you should look into is the edibility of any of the
        weeds that currently grow in your land. I've been really surprised
        about how many weeds we have growing here that are edible and now make
        up a fair part of our diet. A great book containing common edible weeds
        is 'In Touch with the Earth - Useful Weeds at our Doorstep' by Pat
        Collins. Pat lives in the Hunter Valley but I have found her book
        extremely useful down here in Tasmania. The book is available from
        Green Patch Seeds http://www.greenpatchseeds.com.au/herbsremedies.html
        I have taken a number of my weeds to the local Herbarium (part of the
        University) for positive identification (although they refused to
        comment on edibility - I needed the book for that but the internet is
        useful too once you know what you've got).

        Gloria mentioned daikon radish. Should you go down this path, I have
        found Green Patch to be the most economical place to buy daikon seeds
        from in quantity at $120 for 1kg (another company quoted me $900 for
        1kg!). I'll be sowing my daikon in another month or so.

        Cheers,

        Adam
        Tasmania
      • Sergio Montinola
        Dear Adam, I received and read your email on edible weeds . Very interesting and valuable to all natural farmers. I would kike to get hold of the book too. I
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 3, 2004
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          Dear Adam,

          I received and read your email on "edible weeds".

          Very interesting and valuable to all natural farmers.
          I would kike to get hold of the book too.

          I am in the Philippines. we have all kinds of weeds.
          Daikon seeds is not that expensive over here. Maybe we
          can help those that need it too.

          We use our weeds as herbal and medicinal plants most
          of the time.

          Regards,

          Sergio J. Montinola




          --- Adam Carter <accarter@...> wrote:
          > Hi Ernie,
          >
          > One thing that you should look into is the edibility
          > of any of the
          > weeds that currently grow in your land. I've been
          > really surprised
          > about how many weeds we have growing here that are
          > edible and now make
          > up a fair part of our diet. A great book containing
          > common edible weeds
          > is 'In Touch with the Earth - Useful Weeds at our
          > Doorstep' by Pat
          > Collins. Pat lives in the Hunter Valley but I have
          > found her book
          > extremely useful down here in Tasmania. The book is
          > available from
          > Green Patch Seeds
          > http://www.greenpatchseeds.com.au/herbsremedies.html
          >
          > I have taken a number of my weeds to the local
          > Herbarium (part of the
          > University) for positive identification (although
          > they refused to
          > comment on edibility - I needed the book for that
          > but the internet is
          > useful too once you know what you've got).
          >
          > Gloria mentioned daikon radish. Should you go down
          > this path, I have
          > found Green Patch to be the most economical place to
          > buy daikon seeds
          > from in quantity at $120 for 1kg (another company
          > quoted me $900 for
          > 1kg!). I'll be sowing my daikon in another month or
          > so.
          >
          > Cheers,
          >
          > Adam
          > Tasmania
          >
          >


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        • Sergio Montinola
          Dear Adam, I received and read your email on edible weeds . Very interesting and valuable to all natural farmers. I would kike to get hold of the book too. I
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 3, 2004
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            Dear Adam,

            I received and read your email on "edible weeds".

            Very interesting and valuable to all natural farmers.
            I would kike to get hold of the book too.

            I am in the Philippines. we have all kinds of weeds.
            Daikon seeds is not that expensive over here. Maybe we
            can help those that need it too.

            We use our weeds as herbal and medicinal plants most
            of the time.

            Regards,

            Sergio J. Montinola




            --- Adam Carter <accarter@...> wrote:
            > Hi Ernie,
            >
            > One thing that you should look into is the edibility
            > of any of the
            > weeds that currently grow in your land. I've been
            > really surprised
            > about how many weeds we have growing here that are
            > edible and now make
            > up a fair part of our diet. A great book containing
            > common edible weeds
            > is 'In Touch with the Earth - Useful Weeds at our
            > Doorstep' by Pat
            > Collins. Pat lives in the Hunter Valley but I have
            > found her book
            > extremely useful down here in Tasmania. The book is
            > available from
            > Green Patch Seeds
            > http://www.greenpatchseeds.com.au/herbsremedies.html
            >
            > I have taken a number of my weeds to the local
            > Herbarium (part of the
            > University) for positive identification (although
            > they refused to
            > comment on edibility - I needed the book for that
            > but the internet is
            > useful too once you know what you've got).
            >
            > Gloria mentioned daikon radish. Should you go down
            > this path, I have
            > found Green Patch to be the most economical place to
            > buy daikon seeds
            > from in quantity at $120 for 1kg (another company
            > quoted me $900 for
            > 1kg!). I'll be sowing my daikon in another month or
            > so.
            >
            > Cheers,
            >
            > Adam
            > Tasmania
            >
            >


            __________________________________
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            Yahoo! SiteBuilder - Free web site building tool. Try it!
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          • Adam Carter
            Hi Sergio, Assuming that you know what weeds you have (and don t need the book to help with identification) then the best book to obtain is Cornucopia II - A
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 3, 2004
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              Hi Sergio,

              Assuming that you know what weeds you have (and don't need the book to
              help with identification) then the best book to obtain is "Cornucopia
              II - A source book of Edible Plants" by Stephen Facciola. This book is
              encyclopedic and includes of 3000 species and 7000 varieties of food
              plants and their uses by presenting habitat and growing requirements,
              the part of the plant used and traditional uses. The only thing it
              doesn't do is help with identification. This book is available from
              Green Harvest Seeds and you could send them an email at
              inquiries@... to get a quote on sending the book to the
              Philippines. Unfortunately the book is not cheap at AUD $95. A quick
              search on the internet comes up with a prices of USD $40 so you could
              explore obtaining it elsewhere.

              The other book that I mentioned, In Touch with the Earth - Useful Weeds
              at our Doorstep' by Pat Collins, is a lot cheaper at AUD $19.95 but it
              does focus on weeds common in temperate Australia and I would be
              concerned that it may not be of much use to you in the Philippines. The
              email address for ordering this book is
              enquiries@...

              Then again, unlike most of us in the 'West', your knowledge of uses for
              local 'weeds' is probably very strong already.

              Regards,

              Adam.

              On 04/02/2004, at 9:02 AM, Sergio Montinola wrote:

              > Dear Adam,
              >
              > I received and read your email on "edible weeds".
              >
              > Very interesting and valuable to all natural farmers.
              > I would kike to get hold of the book too.
              >
              > I am in the Philippines. we have all kinds of weeds.
              > Daikon seeds is not that expensive over here. Maybe we
              > can help those that need it too.
              >
              > We use our weeds as herbal and medicinal plants most
              > of the time.
              >
              > Regards,
              >
              > Sergio J. Montinola
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --- Adam Carter <accarter@...> wrote:
              >> Hi Ernie,
              >>
              >> One thing that you should look into is the edibility
              >> of any of the
              >> weeds that currently grow in your land. I've been
              >> really surprised
              >> about how many weeds we have growing here that are
              >> edible and now make
              >> up a fair part of our diet. A great book containing
              >> common edible weeds
              >> is 'In Touch with the Earth - Useful Weeds at our
              >> Doorstep' by Pat
              >> Collins. Pat lives in the Hunter Valley but I have
              >> found her book
              >> extremely useful down here in Tasmania. The book is
              >> available from
              >> Green Patch Seeds
              >> http://www.greenpatchseeds.com.au/herbsremedies.html
              >>
              >> I have taken a number of my weeds to the local
              >> Herbarium (part of the
              >> University) for positive identification (although
              >> they refused to
              >> comment on edibility - I needed the book for that
              >> but the internet is
              >> useful too once you know what you've got).
              >>
              >> Gloria mentioned daikon radish. Should you go down
              >> this path, I have
              >> found Green Patch to be the most economical place to
              >> buy daikon seeds
              >> from in quantity at $120 for 1kg (another company
              >> quoted me $900 for
              >> 1kg!). I'll be sowing my daikon in another month or
              >> so.
              >>
              >> Cheers,
              >>
              >> Adam
              >> Tasmania
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
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            • animaphile
              G day Ernie, It s great to read of your good intentions sympathetic with Fukuoka s goals, as an additional person to me in Victoria, Oz, and also some people
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 4, 2004
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                G'day Ernie,
                It's great to read of your good intentions sympathetic with
                Fukuoka's goals, as an additional person to me in Victoria, Oz, and
                also some people previosly on this group such as Elizabeth Denk and
                so on.

                On this map of the bioregions of Victoria -see
                (
                http://www.dpi.vic.gov.au/web/root/Domino/vro/maps.nsf/pages/\
                vic_bioregions?Opendocument
                )
                I'm am in the East Gippsland Lowlands region of Victoria's (Oz)
                bioregions and am also on the border, more or less, of (the State)
                New South Wales. Here is country that the Maap (indigenous) people
                come from. I have lived and worked in Melbourne for many years and
                worked in nature restoration (also called ecological restoration,
                bush regeneration) and in flora and fauna surveying and with
                indigenous peoples all over victoria, including flora & fauna
                surveys in Western Victoria in the Grampians, in Mallee country and
                mallee heathlands, some goldfields work, etc., which are somewhere
                around your area. I hope i may be able to help you with your place,
                with many helpful contact people i can put you in touch with in your
                area - at present i'm in East Gippsland about 600-1000 kms east -
                with much information sources, and with hopefully for you some
                answers or ideas directly from me.

                Firstly which bioregion on the above map would you be in? i could
                picture better in my mind what your place is like in detail if i
                know this, also do you know which type(s) of mallee gum you have,
                golden wattle - the Oz floral emblem - is well known, you can roast
                and eat the seeds of golden wattle and most Victorian wattle trees,
                they are great tasting food, rich in protein and energy in their
                oils, there is much literature and some people and groups i can
                point you to on how to prepare and eat foods such as victorian
                native wattles and many more foods.

                The books mentioned on edible weeds above are good advice, i can add
                my support from experience of eating such species as sow thistles
                etc. Also, for you and Adam and anyone else from Oz, Tim Low also
                wrote a book called "Wild herbs of Australia and New Zealand"
                there's now a 1991 revised edition, (ISBN 0207170010, published in
                1991 by Angus and Robertson, colour and b&w, soft cover, 160 pages
                Price $A19.95 plus $A10 postage within Australia or $A30 overseas
                airmail). Tim Low is the author also of one some better bush food
                books in Oz by 'whitefullahs'.
                see ( http://www.weedinfo.com.au/bk_main2f.html )

                There are also many understory plants aswell as shrubs and trees -
                edible, medicinal, for tool making, nitrogen fixing such as the
                great nitrogen fixers the wattles like your golden wattle.
                Do you have a creek or stream on your place? - this changes what
                types of plants that can grow, naturally, and may give more food
                varieties.

                Mining obviously does alot of damage to soil, but if there are
                broken up rocks or mullock heaps from the mining over the last 100
                years, that would erode the rocks more and weather out their
                phophorus and maybe nitrogen to likely provide at least a little
                more plant soil nutrient than plain rocks before hand. Even mining
                has its minor, i stress minor upsides, even though obviously the
                soil structure is better without it.

                Would you have a digital photo of your place, perhaps i could
                further perceive your situation and perhaps come up with some
                detailed opportunities that you have in the context of your place,
                it must be quite different to where i am know in Victoria, but quite
                similar to places where my natural farming friends are such as
                Castlemaine, Wartook/Laharum area of the Grampians, etc. I must get
                a photo or two of my place online soon.

                Thanks for the enjoyment of sharing our not so far away,
                geographically and ecosystematically, natural farming propositions.
                Not so far as North America or Europe at least.

                Beauty to all,
                Jason Stewart


                --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "sm303lemk4" <ernie@g...>
                wrote:
                > I've have 40 acres of rather hard land in a low rain fall area of
                Victoria Australia which I have now owned for just over a year. I
                intend to use only a small part of the land for producing enough
                product to supply my needs and leave the rest to nature but in a
                better condition than its in now.
                > Over that time most of the advice given to me on making the land
                more productive has been to deep rip the earth and then bring in
                truck loads of top soil ,river sand ,and manure. This attitude has
                never felt right to me and seems a quick fix solution to a long term
                problem. After looking for alternative ways to improve the land I
                came across "The One Straw Revolution" and a set of ideas that I
                feel more comfortable with and finally this group. I am wondering if
                anyone has used these methods to bring new life to a depleated part
                of the land.
                > A quick rundown on the area. The land I own lies on the edge of a
                quarts reef. Over the last 1 hundred years the area has been mined,
                striped of the vegitation for timber and heaverly grazed with no
                improvements done. The 2 main plants on my land are the Golden
                Wattle and Malley Gum.Grasses and weeds are the main forms of
                seasonal ground gover. The soil is lacking in organic material with
                good runoff ability but poor drainage once you get the water in. To
                dig any holes throughout the year a crow bar is essential or some
                form of mechanical device is needed. Rain fall is 400mm on average.
                I have found that if you dont replace the soil when putting in
                plants then in a matter of days the newly dug up ground has set hard
                again and water penitration is difficult. Sorry for the non
                technical description.
                > Any useful comments or ideas would be most welcome.

                > Ernie.
              • penny_wia
                Thanks for that info, Adam - I shall check out the local library for the book by Pat Collins, as well as Tim Low s book, mentioned in a later post. I spent a
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 18, 2004
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                  Thanks for that info, Adam - I shall check out the local library for
                  the book by Pat Collins, as well as Tim Low's book, mentioned in a
                  later post.
                  I spent a few hours searching the Internet for info about edible
                  weeds in North Queensland a few weeks ago, but came up with nothing,
                  so I will try books next.
                  Flo

                  --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Adam Carter <accarter@i...>
                  wrote:
                  > Hi Ernie,
                  >
                  > One thing that you should look into is the edibility of any of the
                  > weeds that currently grow in your land. I've been really surprised
                  > about how many weeds we have growing here that are edible and now
                  make
                  > up a fair part of our diet. A great book containing common edible
                  weeds
                  > is 'In Touch with the Earth - Useful Weeds at our Doorstep' by Pat
                  > Collins. Pat lives in the Hunter Valley but I have found her book
                  > extremely useful down here in Tasmania. The book is available from
                  > Green Patch Seeds
                  http://www.greenpatchseeds.com.au/herbsremedies.html
                  > I have taken a number of my weeds to the local Herbarium (part of
                  the
                  > University) for positive identification (although they refused to
                  > comment on edibility - I needed the book for that but the internet
                  is
                  > useful too once you know what you've got).
                  >
                  > Gloria mentioned daikon radish. Should you go down this path, I
                  have
                  > found Green Patch to be the most economical place to buy daikon
                  seeds
                  > from in quantity at $120 for 1kg (another company quoted me $900
                  for
                  > 1kg!). I'll be sowing my daikon in another month or so.
                  >
                  > Cheers,
                  >
                  > Adam
                  > Tasmania
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