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  • Cesca Beamish
    hello, just discovered fukuoka gardening website so here I am. certified organic smallholding growing veg in 28 beds of 5 x 66 . all mulched with topped
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 27, 2004
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      hello,
      just discovered fukuoka gardening website so here I am.
      certified organic smallholding growing veg in 28 beds of 5' x 66'. all
      mulched with topped weeds, plants or straw and a few runner ducks wandering
      around
      my organic inspector said ooh have you read the one straw revolution and I'd
      never heard of it - sorry!

      tell me more.........
      what are you growing/doing/planning and where why and how

      thanks
      Cesca
      in leicester, uk (zone 9)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John Warner
      Welcome Cesca! The list is on a kind of inactive mode right now but this sort of thing appears to be cyclic, as the seasons. It gets very active from time to
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 27, 2004
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        Welcome Cesca!

        The list is on a kind of inactive mode right now but this sort of thing appears to be cyclic, as the seasons. It gets very active from time to time. Summer will come.

        I was very glad to see that you might be a market gardener [otherwise there would be little point in being certified organic] since that is what I do myself. And we seem to have a similar methodology at least as far as the garden layout is concerned. I have the equivalent of about 19 five foot wide beds 150 feet long so there is a similarity in size as well.

        Like yours, mine are permanent beds, permanently mulched. If you visited my garden one of the most striking things you might notice is the great distance between the beds. In most cases the level area between is wider than the 5' top of the bed and in addition, the sloping sides of the higher beds [now up to 16" above the middles, take up another 3 to 5 feet.

        Another thing you would notice is a large amount of plastic. PVC hoops cover some sections of the beds for the purpose of tying in the flowers and supporting shade cloth during our hot, sunny summers--average highs 99F for nearly a month and no rain, ever. I also use the hoops to deliniate the beds and mark the sections that are irrigated indepently with driptape.

        This season, I'm experimenting with strips of black plastic and old carpet laid across the beds with a narrow open strip between for planting. This is alternative for RoundUp and RoundUp is the alternative for tillage and hence the tractor. I have little tolerance for weeds and, in my experience, there is no amount of organic mulch that will keep the weeds at bay for long. So I'm kind of layer up the beds each year with a fresh layer of improved soil from the meddles [where soil improvement crops are grown in the winter] a layer of fresh organic mulch and then the plastic strips.

        I practice what I call "whole systems agriculture" which has no particular rules as we find in "organic" and "biodynamic" "systems", and the rest of them too, which I consider more as mechanical systems than organic systems because of the rules assoicated with them that ignore context--that is the social, economic matrix in which the garden and gardener are imbeded. It's a tough world for the gardener, working by hand in a global economy. I work for the same wages as a Colombian laborer growing flowers in an ideal enviornment with a tractor and the latest greehouse technology, plus shipping and handling.

        Market gardeners on the list are few. Most of the participants enjoy detailed, theoretical and contoversial discussions, and after a flury, seem to burn out. The many hours I need to spend in my garden keep me from being much of a participator.

        My interest in natural farming leans on minimizing labor inputs and letting the garden system lots of the work. Bioligical integration takes care of most all pest control and I've had some years where volunteers have saved by backside. The garden system is smarter than I am and my job as gardener is to serve the garden system as the hand and nervous system serve the whole human being.

        And I think the day is not too far away when all food will be grown on one kind of "natural farm" or another whether the farmers like it or not or know anything about it or not. It will not be a matter of chice but a consequence of oil depletion. Not much happens on a modern farm without oil and tough times are on the way. Just put "peak oil" on a search and see what comes up.

        Welcome to the list, Cesca. I hope to hear more from you.

        John Warner
        No-Tractor Agriculture near Fresno, California





        Original Message -----
        From: Cesca Beamish
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2004 1:07 PM
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] is there anybody there?


        hello,
        just discovered fukuoka gardening website so here I am.
        certified organic smallholding growing veg in 28 beds of 5' x 66'. all
        mulched with topped weeds, plants or straw and a few runner ducks wandering
        around
        my organic inspector said ooh have you read the one straw revolution and I'd
        never heard of it - sorry!

        tell me more.........
        what are you growing/doing/planning and where why and how

        thanks
        Cesca
        in leicester, uk (zone 9)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Yahoo! Groups Links

        a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/fukuoka_farming/

        b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John Warner
        ... From: John Warner To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2004 4:59 PM Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] is there anybody there?
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 27, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: John Warner
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2004 4:59 PM
          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] is there anybody there?


          Welcome Cesca!

          The list is on a kind of inactive mode right now but this sort of thing appears to be cyclic, as the seasons. It gets very active from time to time. Summer will come.

          I was very glad to see that you might be a market gardener [otherwise there would be little point in being certified organic] since that is what I do myself. And we seem to have a similar methodology at least as far as the garden layout is concerned. I have the equivalent of about 19 five foot wide beds 150 feet long so there is a similarity in size as well.

          Like yours, mine are permanent beds, permanently mulched. If you visited my garden one of the most striking things you might notice is the great distance between the beds. In most cases the level area between is wider than the 5' top of the bed and in addition, the sloping sides of the higher beds [now up to 16" above the middles, take up another 3 to 5 feet.

          Another thing you would notice is a large amount of plastic. PVC hoops cover some sections of the beds for the purpose of tying in the flowers and supporting shade cloth during our hot, sunny summers--average highs 99F for nearly a month and no rain, ever. I also use the hoops to deliniate the beds and mark the sections that are irrigated indepently with driptape.

          This season, I'm experimenting with strips of black plastic and old carpet laid across the beds with a narrow open strip between for planting. This is alternative for RoundUp and RoundUp is the alternative for tillage and hence the tractor. I have little tolerance for weeds and, in my experience, there is no amount of organic mulch that will keep the weeds at bay for long. So I'm kind of layer up the beds each year with a fresh layer of improved soil from the meddles [where soil improvement crops are grown in the winter] a layer of fresh organic mulch and then the plastic strips.

          I practice what I call "whole systems agriculture" which has no particular rules as we find in "organic" and "biodynamic" "systems", and the rest of them too, which I consider more as mechanical systems than organic systems because of the rules assoicated with them that ignore context--that is the social, economic matrix in which the garden and gardener are imbeded. It's a tough world for the gardener, working by hand in a global economy. I work for the same wages as a Colombian laborer growing flowers in an ideal enviornment with a tractor and the latest greehouse technology, plus shipping and handling.

          Market gardeners on the list are few. Most of the participants enjoy detailed, theoretical and contoversial discussions, and after a flury, seem to burn out. The many hours I need to spend in my garden keep me from being much of a participator.

          My interest in natural farming leans on minimizing labor inputs and letting the garden system lots of the work. Bioligical integration takes care of most all pest control and I've had some years where volunteers have saved by backside. The garden system is smarter than I am and my job as gardener is to serve the garden system as the hand and nervous system serve the whole human being.

          And I think the day is not too far away when all food will be grown on one kind of "natural farm" or another whether the farmers like it or not or know anything about it or not. It will not be a matter of chice but a consequence of oil depletion. Not much happens on a modern farm without oil and tough times are on the way. Just put "peak oil" on a search and see what comes up.

          Welcome to the list, Cesca. I hope to hear more from you.

          John Warner
          No-Tractor Agriculture near Fresno, California





          Original Message -----
          From: Cesca Beamish
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2004 1:07 PM
          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] is there anybody there?


          hello,
          just discovered fukuoka gardening website so here I am.
          certified organic smallholding growing veg in 28 beds of 5' x 66'. all
          mulched with topped weeds, plants or straw and a few runner ducks wandering
          around
          my organic inspector said ooh have you read the one straw revolution and I'd
          never heard of it - sorry!

          tell me more.........
          what are you growing/doing/planning and where why and how

          thanks
          Cesca
          in leicester, uk (zone 9)


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Yahoo! Groups Links

          a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/fukuoka_farming/

          b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
          ... notice is the great distance between the beds. In most cases the level area between is wider than the 5 top of the bed and in addition, the sloping sides
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 27, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            ----- If you visited my garden one of the most striking things you might
            notice is the great distance between the beds. In most cases the level area
            between is wider than the 5' top of the bed and in addition, the sloping
            sides of the higher beds [now up to 16" above the middles, take up another 3
            to 5 feet.

            Do you have a purpose for the wide pathways?

            jean-claude
          • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
            ... i am myself interested in integration of many differents plants and animals growing, living ,dying together in such a way that they don t exist for the
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 27, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              > tell me more.........
              > what are you growing/doing/planning and where why and how
              >

              i am myself interested in integration of many differents plants and animals
              growing, living ,dying together in such a way that they don't exist for the
              sole purpose of being harvested . harvesting them being one of the reason
              for their existence but their main function is to be foods for each over .
              that way i am just one of the element and are neither master or slave of the
              whole .
              This way of doing is obviouslly not geared toward commercial farming but
              subsistance farming . I believe that it is the farming of the future and
              hope for the desintegration of the present sytem with only one food
              producer for X consummers .

              In nature this kind of arrangement will not hold water very long either you
              are a producer -consummer or you don't exist at all . The kings wanted it
              differentlyand now we got millions of kings living in urban castles
              exploiting at the maximum the few farmers and the ressources.

              i have been integrating the exogene plants , inside a mixed fir and alder
              forest with 4 or 5 rock bluffs . the rock bluff being the only, for now ,
              sunny spots they have been the recipient of my mostly vegetables garden beds
              ( but still with figs or bushes as companion ) . import of organic matter
              and watering have been necessarry on those spots .

              jean-claude
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