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Natural Farmers in Oz and final responses to previous posts

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  • animaphile
    One again thank you Michiyo for this message 3911, i appreciate the clear straight communication and the effort you have gone to to make it so. The Internet is
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 5, 2004
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      One again thank you Michiyo for this message 3911, i appreciate the
      clear straight communication and the effort you have gone to to make
      it so. The Internet is helpful to & allowing of poor communication
      and interpretation, it does not include facial expressions, body
      expressions, hand gestures for emphasising our words, our hormones,
      our unique, all of us, beautiful physical appearances, it comes
      between each of our vibes or spirits as a medium of electrons which
      may possibly partially transmit our spirits to each according to
      some physicists theories of non-locality in sub-atomic partical
      interactions. But this apparently is only partial, and i think this
      is for me a conclusive description of the value and limits of the
      internet - It is partial and dis-embodied, it takes extra-human
      communication effort to rise above these shortcomings, finally *i*
      (just my opinion of course) think Bob did this in his reply message
      3912 to Michiyo's, I can cope with and even enjoy, whoopy-doo! so
      what, reading Bob's message 3912.

      Moving on, as i now can after releasing my above posts meanings from
      occupying my mind, below is some outstanding stories selected from
      early Oz European 'explorers' rather pre-judiced and distinctly
      harmful colonising 'exploration' (re-explore actually), for you all
      the human worlds appreciation of Oz and its release from racism and
      lies about Australia's history. It is compilation of written
      research i have recently done on Natural Farming of cereals by
      various Indigenous people's of this Oz continent. (sustainable so
      called aboriginal farmers doing everything cereal farmers do but not
      plowing which is often stupidly harmful, especially in Oz's ancient
      soils, no-till European-Oz farmers of course have belatedly learnt
      no plowing) It makes me joyous to the point of tears sometimes to
      extract the natural history from these re-explorers partial
      commentaries and amazes me how much magnificence Europeans-
      Australians and non-indigenous Australians have ignored &
      marginalised in our recounting indigenous peoples and lands history
      and how much land has been destroyed and how much indigenous peoples
      have been suppressed in the past by 'whitefullas'. Thanks to them
      all for still being here in Oz and still strong and recovering from
      us whitefulla's suppressions. I don't know who i be without
      my 'blackfulla' Oz friends. Also see www.sydneydreaming.com.au, i
      attended again this last december, it wonderfully mind-blowing.
      Thanks mates, Jason Stewart

      *********************************

      Cooly or Tindil Shizen Nouhou/food-ecosystem management/natural
      farming (Western NSW Oz Indij people(s) and Cloncurry River Nth QLD,
      respectively, names for Euro-science's Panicum decompositum
      Australian Native Millet.)


      From Tim Low (1988) "Wild Food Plants of Australia" Angus and
      Robertson Publishers 1988, NSW, Australia.

      pages 28 - 29
      `Small seeds are a less obvious food, because hundreds are needed to
      make a meal. They weren't important foods for Aborigines in coastal
      areas, except perhaps for wild rice (Oruyza [sic] meridionalis),
      native flax (Linum marginale) and wattle seeds. But in the outback,
      where grains grow in vast fields, sophisticated seed-grinding
      cultures arose. Grass seeds were harvested in the outback at least
      15,000 years ago. The explorer A. C. Gregory described a more recent
      harvest along Coopers Creek:

      "Fields of 1,000 acres are there met with growing this cereal. The
      natives cut it down by means of stone knives, cutting down the stalk
      halfway, beat out the seed, leaving the straw which is often met
      with in large heaps; they winnow by tossing seed and husk into the
      air, the wind carrying away the husks. The grinding into meal is
      done by means of two stones, a large irregular slab and a small
      cannon-ball-like one."

      Australian millet (Panicum decompositum) was the most important
      native grain, but many other grasses were also used, including
      species of Brachiara, Dactyloctenium, Eragrostis, Panicum,
      Paspalidium, and in the tropics, wild rice (Oryza).

      Like the grasses, the tiny seeds of pigweed and spores of nardoo
      were ground on stones and baked as cakes. Seed-grinding was
      practised throughout much of arid Australia, but did not extend far
      into forested areas. The limits are indicated by the finds of old
      grinding stones [archaeology]. Many kinds of wattle seeds were also
      ground to flour, or eaten green like steamed peas. Kurrajong seeds
      were often eaten whole. ...`


      From J.W. Maiden (1889) "The Useful Native Plants of Australia"
      Facsimile edition published 1975 by Compendium Pty Ltd, Melb.,
      Australia.

      page iii
      'Joseph Henry Maiden
      Joseph Henry Maiden, botanist, was born in London in 1859 and
      educated at London University. On account of his health, he was
      ordered on a sea voyage and came to Australia in 1880.
      Greatly interested in native plants, he began a lifelong study of
      systematic botany and forestry in Australia, corresponding and
      working with von Mueller and others in the field.
      Among the various positions that he held were those of Curator of
      the Technological Museum of New South Wales (1881-1896), and
      Government Botanist and Director of the Botanic Gardens, Sydney
      (1896-1924). ...'

      [beware reader of the worse than todays Australian colonial
      mentality in reading this, it is evident in the language of
      referring to 'aboriginal' peoples subtly as object, foreign beings,
      ie. as 'the other', and this incredible ignoring blind-spot towards
      their farming perhaps colonisers-self-serving willful pretense of
      ignorance or self-serving-denial-by-disbelief or disbelief-by-self-
      sense-of-superiority in not understanding what "the natives" purpose
      was in cutting vast landscapes of grains.]

      page 51
      `Human Foods
      160. Panicum decompositum, R.Br. (Syn. P. laevinode, Lindl.; P.
      proliferum, F.v.M.;P.amabile, Balansa), N.O, Gramineae, B.Fl., vii.,
      489.

      "Native Millet," "Umbrella Grass." The seed used to be
      called "Cooly" by Western New South Wales aboriginals, and "Tindil"
      by the aboriginals of the Cloncurry River (North Queensland).

      The grains pounded yield excellent food, although the grains are
      rather small. This plant is not endemic to Australia. All the
      colonies [sic - states of Oz today] except Tasmania.`

      pages 96 - 98
      `Forage Plants
      103. Panicum colonum, Linn. (Syn. Oplismenus colonum, Kunth); B.Fl.,
      vii., 478.
      "Shama Millet" of India; called also, in parts of India, "Wild Rice"
      or "Jungle Rice."
      Has erect stems from two to eight feet high, and very succulent. The
      panicles are used by aboriginals as an article of food. The seeds
      are pounded between stones, mixed with water, and formed into a kind
      of bread. It is not endemic in Australia.
      Composition of Shama (husked)-
      In 100 parts. In 1 lb.
      Water ... 12.0 ... 1 oz. 403 grs.
      Albuminoids 9.6 ... 1 '' 234 ''
      Starch ... 74.3 ... 11'' 388 ''
      Oil ... .6 ... 42 ''
      Fibre ... 1.5 ... 105 ''
      Ash ... 2.0 ... 140 ''
      Food-grains of India. (Church).
      North Queensland.[distribution in Oz]
      ...
      105. Panicum decompositum, R.Br., (Syn. P. proliferum, F.v.M.; P.
      amabile, Balansa; P. laevinode, Lindl.); B.Fl., vii, 489.
      "Australian Millet," "Umbrella Grass," "Tindil" of the aboriginals
      of the Cloncurry River, North Queensland.

      One of the most valuable of the Darling Downs (Queensland) grasses.
      Under cultivation it has yielded in one season over three tons of
      hay per acre. It is a semi-aquatic species, tall, coarse, and
      succulent, producing an abundance of feed, and greatly relished by
      stock. It seeds in December and January. It is short-lived, but is
      one of the most spacious of Australian nutritious species. The
      aborigines convert the small millet-like grains into cakes.
      Alluding to this grass, Sir Thomas Mitchell ("Three Expeditions")
      pp. 237 and 290, says :- "In the neighbourhood of our camp the grass
      had been pulled to a very great extent, and piled in hay-ricks [old
      word for hay-stack], so that the aspect of the desert was softened
      into the agreeable semblance of a hay-field. The grass had evidently
      been thus laid up by the natives, but for what purpose we could not
      imagine. [huh!?] At first I thought the heaps were only the remains
      of encampments, as the aborigines sometimes sleep on a little dry
      grass, but when we found the ricks [stacks], or hay-cocks, extending
      for miles, we were quite at a loss to understand why they had been
      made. All the grass was of one kind, and not a spike of it was left
      in the soil, over the whole of the ground ... We were still at a
      loss to know for what purpose the heaps of one particular kind of
      grass had been pulled, and so laid up hereabouts. Whether it was
      accumulated by the natives to allure birds [huh!?], or by rats, as
      their holes were seen beneath, we were puzzled to determine. The
      grass was beautifully green beneath the heaps, and full of seeds,
      and our cattle were very fond of this hay."
      This plant is not endemic in Australia.
      All colonies except Tasmania.
      ...
      121. Panicum prolutum, F.v.M., B.Fl., vii., 490.
      ...
      In former years, the seeds of this grass were gathered in large
      quantities by the natives as an article of food, and being ground
      between two stones, was converted into a kind of meal.
      ...
      `

      From A.B. & J.W. Cribb (1987) "Wild Food in Australia" 2nd Ed.
      Fontana/Collins

      page 116
      Seeds
      `Panicum decompositum Australian Millet, Native Millet, Umbrella
      Grass

      This common grass of the interior has a branching inflorescence
      which breaks of at maturity and is widely distributed by wind. It
      was one of the most important native food plants, the seeds being
      ground between stones, made into a paste and baked in the ashes.
      Major Sir Thomas Mitchell in his "Journal of an Expedition into the
      interior of Tropical Australia" made an interesting entry concerning
      this grass, and disclosed his uneasiness at being partly responsible
      for the eventual displacement of the black man. This entry, made as
      he journeyed along the Narran River, read as follows: "The Panicum
      laevinode of Dr. Lindley seemed to predominate, a grass whereof the
      seed ("Cooly") is made by the natives into a kind of paste or bread.
      Dry heaps of this grass that has been pulled expressly for the
      purpose of gathering the seed, lay along our path for many miles. I
      counted nine miles along the river, in which we rode through this
      grass only, reaching our saddle-girths, and the same grass seemed to
      grow back from the river, at least as far as the eye could reach
      through a very open forest. I had never seen such a rich natural
      pasturage in any other part of New South Wales. Still it was what
      supplied the bread of the natives; and these children of the soil
      were doing everything in their power to assist me, whose wheel
      tracks would probably bring white man's cattle into it." [Here i
      suspect is the reason for the what seems the denial of the obvious
      above in the other quote from this same 'explorer' Mitchell - his
      guilt, sometimes admitting it sometimes hidding it by denial of in
      his writing of what he sees, interestingly i don't know but would
      like to find out the dates of these two, above, of Mitchell's
      writings.]
      Distribution: All mainland states
      `
    • Adam Carter
      Hi Jamie, Thanks for the compilation on the aboriginal use of grass seeds. However doesn t this constitute gathering rather than natural farming? To me,
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 6, 2004
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        Hi Jamie,

        Thanks for the compilation on the aboriginal use of grass seeds.
        However doesn't this constitute gathering rather than natural farming?
        To me, gathering is the ideal and natural farming is a substitute that
        we have been reduced to using due to the destructiveness of our
        culture.

        Cheers,

        Adam
        Tasmania
        Australia
      • animaphile
        Actually it is Jason from Maap country S.E. Oz, nevermind. Thanks for the reply, yes i d agree that the history is different to natural farming but the
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 8, 2004
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          Actually it is Jason from Maap country S.E. Oz, nevermind.
          Thanks for the reply, yes i'd agree that the history is different to
          natural farming but the philosophy and practice integrated together
          are the same nowadays in terms of Fukuoka as the example of Natural
          Farming to compare with so called hunter gatherers in Oz. Better
          described equably in modern or scientific-informed english english
          as ecosystem managers or in aboriginal english as people caring for
          country.

          Please read
          http://www.mcauley.acu.edu.au/~yuri/readings/charlesworth.htm
          for an in english fairly fair treatment of Oz Indigenous people's
          philosophy and the past history of establishment and anthropologist
          whitefulla's self-lies and projection in trying to understand Indij
          Oz 'blackfulla's'. it has taken 200 years or so (until recently) for
          whitefulla's officially (exceptions of course are whitefulla's who
          shared their lives with 'blackfulla's) to start to fairly or equably
          understand Indij Oz 'blackfulla's civilisations, many of them and
          their languages, cultures, religions, variety of land management
          practices, foods, highly advanced social systems - more advanced
          than any european social systems, and so on.

          On subject that is important to me in the comparison we are
          discussing is the big lie about agriculture: first this words'
          history and etymology is from tilling the soil (agrarian and farming
          are not words that come from meanings of tilling soil, they mean to
          be out in the field...), culture and cultivated when used in english
          as an exclusive, elitist or prejudiced term is based on the
          pretension that people who till the soil are superior and more
          civilised than people who don't - a very big lie and a super-
          simplification also. (What have english farmers who practice no-till
          farming done toady - have they suddenly within their lifetimes
          become inferior humans and less civilised, i hope this point bemuses
          you the reader, furthermore have their societies as a whole become
          less civilised because of this, it is/was alot of self-serving
          racist or prejudiced and uninformed rot when people for example
          english have said this type of thing). In healing the earth today
          outcomes are equally as important as purposes and the philosophy.

          More later, gotta move
          see ya - jyaa-ne
          Jason Stewart


          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Adam Carter <accarter@i...>
          wrote:
          > Hi Jamie,
          >
          > Thanks for the compilation on the aboriginal use of grass seeds.
          > However doesn't this constitute gathering rather than natural
          farming?
          > To me, gathering is the ideal and natural farming is a substitute
          that
          > we have been reduced to using due to the destructiveness of our
          > culture.
          >
          > Cheers,
          >
          > Adam
          > Tasmania
          > Australia
        • LESLIEANDMARC@aol.com
          Please unsubscribe us for the New Year....Thanks.... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 8, 2004
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            Please unsubscribe us for the New Year....Thanks....


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