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to Daryll, and Lori

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  • roberto pokachinni
    To Daryll, and Lori, Hello and welcome. I am not an expert Fukuoker, but I can answer some of your questions to the best of my ability. The basic idea behind
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 14, 2002
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      To Daryll, and Lori, Hello and welcome. I am not an
      expert Fukuoker, but I can answer some of your
      questions to the best of my ability. The basic idea
      behind fukuoka's seedballs is that you wrap your seeds
      (anywhere from 1-40 of them) in a half inch ball of
      clay, and fertile homous. this clay ball is
      essentially a dormancy shell, and will keep most
      animals from eating the seeds, as the animals are not
      used to the seeds being encased in clay. Of course
      this is not fool proof. Fukuoka's methods must be
      adjusted to your needs. If you have no soil, then you
      must build soil somehow. You might be able to do this
      with plants that like to grow in virtually no soil to
      start with, and let them grow, and die, to form soil.
      Sometimes the fukuoka method will not produce food the
      first year, but in successive years, with improving
      soil, you will. So to answer your question, is there
      any need for ground preparation?-It depends on your
      soil, and how quickly you want to harvest food, or
      grow landscape plants on it. the same goes for
      watering-it all depends on what your watering
      situation is, and what you want to grow. The fukuoka
      ideal is to grow plants on your land that will only
      need the water that falls on your land. The rainfall
      will germinate the seeds, breaking the dormancy of the
      clay ball, and begin it's life, and as in nature, only
      the strong survive. Weeds? You may want to
      destabilize the stronger growers on your property, so
      that your veggies have a fighting chance, that was the
      advice given to me, but as I have not yet gotten onto
      my project, I can only speak from what I have read.
      it is best to use perenial seeds as they will have
      more luck, once established, in keeping your weeds
      away. For more complete ideas see www.seedballs.com,
      or check out some of the posts in this group. Good
      luck. -------roberto

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    • roberto pokachinni
      To Daryll, and Lori, Hello and welcome. I am not an expert Fukuoker, but I can answer some of your questions to the best of my ability. The basic idea behind
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 14, 2002
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        To Daryll, and Lori, Hello and welcome. I am not an
        expert Fukuoker, but I can answer some of your
        questions to the best of my ability. The basic idea
        behind fukuoka's seedballs is that you wrap your seeds
        (anywhere from 1-40 of them) in a half inch ball of
        clay, and fertile homous. this clay ball is
        essentially a dormancy shell, and will keep most
        animals from eating the seeds, as the animals are not
        used to the seeds being encased in clay. Of course
        this is not fool proof. Fukuoka's methods must be
        adjusted to your needs. If you have no soil, then you
        must build soil somehow. You might be able to do this
        with plants that like to grow in virtually no soil to
        start with, and let them grow, and die, to form soil.
        Sometimes the fukuoka method will not produce food the
        first year, but in successive years, with improving
        soil, you will. So to answer your question, is there
        any need for ground preparation?-It depends on your
        soil, and how quickly you want to harvest food, or
        grow landscape plants on it. the same goes for
        watering-it all depends on what your watering
        situation is, and what you want to grow. The fukuoka
        ideal is to grow plants on your land that will only
        need the water that falls on your land. The rainfall
        will germinate the seeds, breaking the dormancy of the
        clay ball, and begin it's life, and as in nature, only
        the strong survive. Weeds? You may want to
        destabilize the stronger growers on your property, so
        that your veggies have a fighting chance, that was the
        advice given to me, but as I have not yet gotten onto
        my project, I can only speak from what I have read.
        it is best to use perenial seeds as they will have
        more luck, once established, in keeping your weeds
        away. For more complete ideas see www.seedballs.com,
        or check out some of the posts in this group. Good
        luck. -------roberto

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      • Rod
        hello i am new to this mailing list but i am afraid some of the postings are somewhat missing the point of fukuoka s teachings. Daryll and Lori and other
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 16, 2002
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          hello
          i am new to this mailing list but i am afraid some of
          the postings are somewhat missing the point of
          fukuoka's teachings. Daryll and Lori and other novice
          growers, please do not get obsessed with methods
          including seed balls. The seedballs website is nice
          but fukuoka's teaching goes well beyond most of what
          is displayed here. The only way you or others will
          understand fukuoka's ideas of natural farming are to
          read his books, Road Back to Nature, One Straw
          revolution and The Natural Way of Farming. These are
          not out of print as mentioned by some. Where i am in
          england these are available by mail order from
          Permenent Publications and Eco-logic books (use
          internet search engine to find websites and how to
          buy) i think they could mail abroad too.


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        • souscayrous
          Hello Rod, I ve ordered and received The One Straw Revolution and The Natural Way of Farming from Permanent Publications here in France, I suspect they d
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 16, 2002
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            Hello Rod, I've ordered and received 'The One Straw Revolution' and 'The
            Natural Way of Farming' from Permanent Publications here in France, I
            suspect they'd be happy to mail to America as well (where I think the
            majority of the members of this list live), though the publisher in India
            can probably accommodate that also:

            English Distributor:

            Permanent Publications
            Hyden House ltd
            The Sustainability Centre
            East Meon
            Hampshire
            GU32 1HR
            United Kingdom
            www.permaculture.co.uk

            Indian Publisher;

            Bookventure
            38 Thanikachalam Road
            T. Nagar
            Madras - 600 017
            India

            There is some doubt as to the copyright status of these editions, however,
            as you rightly say there is no better understanding of Fukuoka than through
            his books and this is currently the only source other than grossly inflated
            prices of secondhand books. There is also the fact that Fukuoka has
            explicitly rejected the republication of these earlier works so that his
            latest teaching (understanding, guidance...) will take precedence: though I
            am not aware of a published source of this work, nor of its exact substance
            (anybody have any further knowledge on the book or its contents?).

            I think it would be useful to us all if you could explain what you see as
            Fukuoka's 'teaching', especially what you are doing to adapt to an English
            climate, he does after all only specifically address farming in a Japanese
            climate (my knowledge of Japan does not extend to the variability of the
            climate within Japan and perhaps Fukuoka is addressing himself to an even
            smaller section of the archipelago). This list is really trying to focus
            upon what can be done in each of our bioregions to apply what we understand
            Fukuoka to be saying. Forms of interpretation, types of climate, soil
            conditions due to previous agricultural practices etc create wildly
            different solutions to how to begin! Seedballs are fundamental to
            revegetation and reforestation of degraded lands, although their use as
            vehicles for vegetable production is not so certain (see the archives for
            information, especially those of Emilia who has had many years of experience
            in developing Fukuokas ideas). Yet, the unadorned power of natural
            regeneration displayed by seedballs is a fundamental lesson on the way to
            Natural Farming. I am fascinated by what Larry is doing and what will take
            place in his garden in Oregon over the next three years and Jim's site is
            perhaps the most accessible introduction to Fukuoka there is;
            www.seedballs.org.

            In response to some of the posts in 'Why Fukuoka', it is interesting that
            others, like myself, have come to Fukuoka through Permaculture. I do not
            mean I have gone beyond permaculture as I still participate in the pc list,
            but I am more comfortable intellectually with Fukuoka, perhaps because of
            the technique (method) orientation of pc mentioned by Rod. For Adam and
            Roberto, Fukuoka seems a more visceral answer, one that I feel I understand
            personally through an earlier infatuation with the 'noble savage' argument
            of Jean-Jacques Rousseau that informs, though implicitly, many of the modern
            primitivist (if that isn't an oxymoron!) movements. I wonder if Robert in
            OKC also catches the spiritual nature of some of our attachments to Fukuoka?

            To Jim and Masanobu who advocate less thought: yes, less sterile academic
            thought unweighted by an attachment (at no point do I mean simply the legal
            possession of land) to land (urban, surbaban or rural); sometimes known as
            scientific thought, but surely, not less thought per se? There are
            philosophies that understand that thinking is the most profound form of
            thanks. My understanding of the land I work only comes through working,
            then observing and then reflecting: a hermeneutic circle. Read
            postmodernism, in the preceding sentence; ultimately, it is
            modern/postmodern philosophy that brought me to Fukuoka.


            Souscayrous


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Rod [mailto:rod@...]
            Sent: Saturday, February 16, 2002 6:59 PM
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [fukuoka_farming] to Daryll, and Lori etc.

            hello
            i am new to this mailing list but i am afraid some of
            the postings are somewhat missing the point of
            fukuoka's teachings. Daryll and Lori and other novice
            growers, please do not get obsessed with methods
            including seed balls. The seedballs website is nice
            but fukuoka's teaching goes well beyond most of what
            is displayed here. The only way you or others will
            understand fukuoka's ideas of natural farming are to
            read his books, Road Back to Nature, One Straw
            revolution and The Natural Way of Farming. These are
            not out of print as mentioned by some. Where i am in
            england these are available by mail order from
            Permenent Publications and Eco-logic books (use
            internet search engine to find websites and how to
            buy) i think they could mail abroad too.


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            Yahoo! Sports - Coverage of the 2002 Olympic Games
            http://sports.yahoo.com

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