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Ideas for my 80 acres.

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  • Hugh Jordan
    Hi I recently purchased 80 off the grid acres in South-Central BC. It has a large creek running through the western half. There are 3 benches west of the
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 26, 2003
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      Hi

      I recently purchased 80 off the grid acres in South-Central BC. It has a large creek running through the western half. There are 3 benches west of the creek. East of the creek is a large meadow. The eastern boundary has some high land that slopes down to a small swamp. The southern boundary is a 40 metre high rocky ridge. The soil is glacial silt, with few rocks. There is substantial grazing land. The land close to the creek and swamp has quite a lot of willow and poplar shrubs. Water rights to the creek is severely limited. The altitude is about 1050 metres, so there can be frost any month of the year. It is 60 km from a good farmer's market.

      My thoughts are to replace the poplar/willow shrubs with fruit bearing, cold climate shrubs such as elderberries, currants and saskatoons. There should be enough moisture to avoid having to irrigate. I will be using pigs in portable electric fencing to prepare the soil. Pastured chickens are part of my plan, some layers and some silkies (they are used in Chinese medicine, so there may be a niche). Some grass fed cattle are in the plan and possibly some goats.

      I am very interested in working to maintain the animal gene pool in the face of the industrial farm model. I am thinking of Tamworth pigs and Galloway cattle. I am thinking of reseeding the large meadow with a concentration of legumes, mostly clovers, as alfalfa apparently doesn't do well according to the local farmers.

      I would appreciate any thoughts and suggestions.

      Hugh
      Innisfree Farm

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
      I recently purchased 80 off the grid acres in South-Central BC. It has a large creek running through the western half. There are 3 benches west of the creek.
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 26, 2003
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        I recently purchased 80 off the grid acres in South-Central BC. It has a large creek running through the western half. There are 3 benches west of the creek. East of the creek is a large meadow. The eastern boundary has some high land that slopes down to a small swamp. The southern boundary is a 40 metre high rocky ridge. The soil is glacial silt, with few rocks. There is substantial grazing land. The land close to the creek and swamp has quite a lot of willow and poplar shrubs. Water rights to the creek is severely limited. The altitude is about 1050 metres, so there can be frost any month of the year. It is 60 km from a good farmer's market.

        My thoughts are to replace the poplar/willow shrubs with fruit bearing, cold climate shrubs such as elderberries, currants and saskatoons. There should be enough moisture to avoid having to irrigate. I will be using pigs in portable electric fencing to prepare the soil. Pastured chickens are part of my plan, some layers and some silkies (they are used in Chinese medicine, so there may be a niche). Some grass fed cattle are in the plan and possibly some goats.

        I am very interested in working to maintain the animal gene pool in the face of the industrial farm model. I am thinking of Tamworth pigs and Galloway cattle. I am thinking of reseeding the large meadow with a concentration of legumes, mostly clovers, as alfalfa apparently doesn't do well according to the local farmers.

        I would appreciate any thoughts and suggestions.

        hello hugh
        i am jean-claude living on saltspring island Bc
        i am very glad to hear about your project .raising animals with their natural originel diet is an attraction to me . here it is difficult because i don't have the acreage to do that with big mamals (Only 5 acres )., i have 3 ewes with lambs , one goat left and 15 pigeons for now. want to extend to ducks pheasants peacoks and chickens ... i don't know Galloway cattle but highland cattle is a very interesting breed ( a neighbour have them and i get a purelly grass fed one each year )..
        i am also into welcoming and favorising wild animals on my land and find a great way to produce high quality meats for our own consumption ( deers , quails , robins are the most abondant).( we are adjacent to a park and a big wild property ) your land with swamps could become even more attractive to geeses and ducks ..
        masanobu didn't touch this aspect of natural farming apart from his chicken and ducks experience so there is lot to do in that regard that could revolutionise the artificial separation between domestic and wilds animals , that could redefine our relationship to our food sources .
        In france i used to raise free range horses in the mountains so i can appreciate the difference for an animal to be able to move freelly .
        i will be very carefull with pigs as they can be quickly very destructive to the environment . in the wild they need big surfaces with rich food supply ( acorns chesnuts and alike ). move them very frequently before they desertify one spot . plant right now for them in the future a forest rich in nuts and fruits .
        you seem to want to disturb the swamp aera ( not a good idea in my opinion leave the shrubs there and add more of what you want )it is important for the health of the water to have those filtering trees around the creek to protect it from the unavoidable spoiling by animals .

        at this altitude ( see holzer in austria as a good exemple of what can be done in high elevation ) raspberries should do well . keep us informed of what is happenning .



        jean-claude







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • pandmpark
        ... has a large creek running through the western half. Hi Hugh, We also recently bought land (18 acres) in Southern BC, near Creston. It looks like you ve
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 29, 2003
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          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Hugh Jordan" <hjordan@t...>
          wrote:
          > Hi
          >
          > I recently purchased 80 off the grid acres in South-Central BC. It
          has a large creek running through the western half. >

          Hi Hugh,

          We also recently bought land (18 acres) in Southern BC, near Creston.

          It looks like you've got the beginnings of a good plan. For much of
          the Southern Interior, Saskatoon berry bushes appear to be a natural
          part of the transition/recovery from cleared to reforested land...so
          they thrive naturally. Besides, they're delicious.

          Last spring on the Permaculture Design course in Winlaw, we visited
          a farm where they were growing chickens using a "churt" (chicken
          yurt). It is a mesh-covered pen, that is moveable. They moved it
          twice a day, allowing the chickens access to fresh grass, bugs, etc.
          and supplemented with grain. I'm planning to try it next spring.

          I have a friend with a small herd of Belted Galloways near Enderby.
          I don't know a lot about them, but I can get more info (source etc)
          if you need it.

          All the best with your farm.

          Paul
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