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Re: [fukuoka_farming] our brother is backwith us!

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  • Larry Haftl
    Hi Beatrice, Finally got rid of the thousands of viagra, debt elimination, porn offerings, and get-rich schemes emails, so now I m going through the 900+
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 7 3:28 AM
      Hi Beatrice,

      Finally got rid of the thousands of viagra, debt elimination, porn
      offerings, and get-rich schemes emails, so now I'm going through the 900+
      FukuokaFarming messages. Saving all the links you people have been
      mentioning to add to the website and making some notes on some of the
      threads for later comment.

      Loved the stuff on the mango seed, and while fire can be an effective tool
      in vegetation management I would hesitate to recommend it to anyone who has
      not done it before. There have been a lot of homes lost over the years to
      escaped controlled burns. I've used it and may use it this fall, but then
      I've been trained to do it and have some experience with it. I also admit to
      having a LOT of fun doing it as well.

      Getting the rest of Emilia's and Alex Weir's stuff up on the website is a
      high priority. Would love to add profiles of some of the new people on the
      list to the projects section. And if anyone has any other neat ideas I'm
      totally open to seeing what can be done to increase the value of the
      information on the website.

      Again, I apologize for not seeing the addressing problem sooner. I'd like to
      blame it all on the great drugs I got for the back stuff, but that would not
      be fair to my doctor. I should have been periodically checking the site to
      make sure it was available.

      One thought that kept coming to me while I watched the weeds take over my
      yard is that I don't belive Fukuoka's methods will work unless you first
      break the growing cycle of what is already growing there. Planting a cover
      crop to smother weeds does not seem to work unless you somehow nuke the
      weeds hard enough to give the cover crop seeds a fighting chance. The three
      methods for doing this that come to mind are cultivation, fire, and a deep,
      smothering mulch of some sort. And a problem with the deep mulch is that it
      will suppress what's there, but forms a great place for all the airborne
      weed seeds to find a home. So you end up with weeds the next season anyway.
      Personally I'm thinking of fire next month, but then I'm still not thinking
      all that clearly yet (but getting back to the computer sure seems to be
      helping).

      Larry Haftl
      larry@...
      http://LarryHaftl.com
      http://FukuokaFarmingOL.net
    • Gloria C. Baikauskas
      Ah! Larry! Isn t being greeted with such warmth truly heartwarming? *g* We are all glad you are back with us. On the weeds thing.......Larry......do yourself
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 7 11:56 AM
        Ah! Larry! Isn't being greeted with such warmth truly heartwarming?
        *g* We are all glad you are back with us.

        On the weeds thing.......Larry......do yourself a favor and see what
        weeds are growing first..before you try to erradicate them with any
        method. It has been something I have worked with this year a bit. I
        have found that weeds may not be the enemy. It is known that the
        weeds will bring up nutrients beyond the intended plants' reach for
        one thing. I had weeds I left around my strawberries and grapes, for
        instance. They were thriving. My dh pulled them one day to be ever
        so helpful. The plants stopped thriving. I allowed new weeds to
        take their place...and the strawberries and grapes began to thrive
        once again.

        I do realize that some weeds are allelopathic....and can cause other
        problems as well. I suspect that we often shoot ourselves in the
        foot when we pull them...or in any way remove them from our gardens.

        Thinking about Nature's gardens.....Nature doesn't pull weeds, but
        allows them to live in tandem with the other plants. I seriously
        doubt Nature considers any plants weeds.

        I don't know the names of all the weeds I left growing. Going to
        work on identifying them soon. I need to find someone to teach me.
        Trying to learn them all from books and online is proving confusing.
        I do think this may be an important element in successfully growing
        Fukuoka's way.....or any other.
        Gloria
      • Larry Haftl
        Hi Gloria, ... Yes it is, and it sure beats the heck out of getting stoned to death for letting the website become temporarily inaccessible. Actually, I ve
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 7 3:09 PM
          Hi Gloria,

          > Ah! Larry! Isn't being greeted with such warmth truly heartwarming?

          Yes it is, and it sure beats the heck out of getting stoned to death for
          letting the website become temporarily inaccessible.

          Actually, I've made peace with the weeds. All of them. I was just wishing
          there were more edible things out there as well - tomatoes, melons, squash,
          etc.

          I've decided on what I'll do in areas where I want to suppress the weeds in
          order to grow the less aggressive vegetables. I'm just going to cut the
          grass/weeds short in that area and then cover the entire area with a thick
          layer of straw. Wet the straw to start it on its way to decomposing, do a
          little localized turning through the winter as the more ambitious plants
          push through the straw (lift the straw mulch so the plants are pulled back
          through it, and then lay the mulch layer back on top of those weeds to cover
          them and make them expend more energy trying to poke through the mulch
          layer.) Come spring I'll just plant right into the area, probably with a
          combination of transplants (my greenhouse will no longer be a chicken coop
          by then) and some direct seeding. Not even going to dig paths between the
          "beds", just mark them somehow to keep from walking on the planting areas.

          I've got two prime areas I'm thinking about doing this to. One is the area
          where I wanted to put the raised beds this year. Completely overrun with a
          wide variety of plants, none of them tender vegetables. The other area is
          where the chicken tractor has been moving over. Great crop of white clover
          with most of the other weeds except dandelions completely knocked down.
          Seriously chicken manured. Probably prime area for putting in a traditional
          vegetable garden next spring. Maybe I'll move the chicken tractors to the
          area that was supposed to be raised beds and use the birds to weed/fertilize
          it through the winter and next year, then rotate the areas each year.

          This is getting very interesting. No tilling, no heavy back-breaking labor,
          no added inputs other than chicken feed (which gives us a lot of eggs,
          chickens fresh and in the freezer, and new chicks in the spring to keep the
          cycle going.) Biggest danger is those very dangerous sacks of chicken feed
          (it was one of those )(^*#!%*^% that caused me to tear the back muscles in
          the first place).

          Larry Haftl
          larry@...
          http://LarryHaftl.com
          http://FukuokaFarmingOL.net
        • Gloria C. Baikauskas
          Sounds like a mighty good plan to me, Larry. Gloria
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 7 8:43 PM
            Sounds like a mighty good plan to me, Larry.
            Gloria
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