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Re: Australian newcomer

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  • Gloria C. Baikauskas
    Great to have you with us, Flo! It would seem you have been reading the messages. If you will check in the files, you will find more information, including
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 5, 2003
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      Great to have you with us, Flo! It would seem you have been reading
      the messages. If you will check in the files, you will find more
      information, including excerpts from some of Fukuoka's books.

      Another great place for things to read online is
      http://www.soilandhealth.org

      Do you have much land there? Or do you live in town?
      Gloria, Texas, US
    • penny_wia
      We are on 2.4 acres, but might be moving soon to 9 acres, so it is a bit difficult knowing anything I do in the garden, I might not be around to follow-up. I
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 6, 2003
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        We are on 2.4 acres, but might be moving soon to 9 acres, so it is a
        bit difficult knowing anything I do in the garden, I might not be
        around to follow-up. I don't have a green thumb. When I try and
        grow vegetables conventionally (but without chemicals), they don't
        seem to do too well. I have just read a book about the bio-intensive
        method, and so am trying that now, but I just heard about the Fukuoka
        method and would like to look into it more, because it seems less
        destructive to plants. Also, I have been learning about the
        possibility of taking an Ahisma non-destructive approach to farming,
        which would require eating only fruit as that is non-destructive to
        plants (I think the plants want us to eat their fruit). Actually, it
        is my partner's goal to be able to grow enough high-protein, high-
        other-necessary-nutrients fruit to be able to be fruitarian.
        It is Spring here in Australia, and very dry at the moment in
        Townsville.

        Flo

        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Gloria C. Baikauskas"
        <gcb49@f...> wrote:
        > Great to have you with us, Flo! It would seem you have been
        reading
        > the messages. If you will check in the files, you will find more
        > information, including excerpts from some of Fukuoka's books.
        >
        > Another great place for things to read online is
        > http://www.soilandhealth.org
        >
        > Do you have much land there? Or do you live in town?
        > Gloria, Texas, US
      • Gloria C. Baikauskas
        ... wrote: I don t have a green thumb. When I try and ... When you say conventionally.......do you mean not organically? I was not sure what you meant there.
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 6, 2003
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          --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "penny_wia" <flowia@r...>
          wrote:
          I don't have a green thumb. When I try and
          > grow vegetables conventionally (but without chemicals), they don't
          > seem to do too well.

          When you say conventionally.......do you mean not organically? I was
          not sure what you meant there. Even Fukuoka used chicken manure in
          his gardens in the beginning at least.

          I started here with basically dead soil. It is still coming to life,
          so-to-speak. I am not rushing it. It means that sometimes things
          don't grow well for me.......and I have always had a green thumb. I
          do have chickens, but when I fertilize I most often use rabbit
          manure. One reason for that is that often rabbits are fed things
          like alfalfa....which also helps plants. Rabbit manure doesn't have
          to be aged.......can be used directly on the soil.

          Saying all of that....you might consider that interplanting will give
          you the proper nutrient mix in the soil for your plants.
          And .....weeds will do a wonderful job of both adding nutrients to
          the soil......and bringing them up from further down in the soil
          where the plants' roots cannot reach them to a place where they can.

          One of the things about 'natural' gardening/farming is paying
          attention to how Nature grows things. You won't find many plants
          telling the weeds to take a hike. I think we get too carried away
          with making things neat and tidy.....trying to make them too pleasing
          to the eye.

          It is hard to put one's heart into a project knowing one will be
          moving on to another place. Just think that whatever beneficial
          things you do for your present property may be just the building
          blocks needed there for future residents to garden/farm.
          Gloria
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