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Re: Gloria's haven

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  • Gloria C. Baikauskas
    ... a pecan ... harvest them ... Avenue, I ... around with ... Norie.....I so enjoyed hearing your story. It made me realize that whether it is a plant, or
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 8, 2003
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      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "norie" <nfukuda@m...> wrote:
      > It's so inspiring to hear stories of your garden. I'd love to grow
      a pecan
      > tree....how big is yours? When I lived in New Orleans, we'd
      harvest them
      > from the median strips between the streets (along Elysian Feilds
      Avenue, I
      > think)...Big hearty pecan trees were everywhere and people went
      around with
      > their bags collecting those tasty nuts.....YUM!
      > Norie Fukuda
      > Tokyo Japan

      Norie.....I so enjoyed hearing your story. It made me realize that
      whether it is a plant, or amphibian, reptile, etc, that all things
      seem to grow best without our help no matter how well intended.
      Perhaps your landlord will enjoy your vines after all.

      My pecan trees (2) are 8 feet tall I think. I did not plant them
      from seed. We planted them as a further memorial to my father-in-law
      after his death nearly 2 years ago. (We had already planted a lilac
      bush in his memory.) I do intend to try planting 2 more pecan trees
      from seed this fall to see the difference between the growth rates.
      They will not bear fruits for quite some time yet.

      I also have a peach tree, 2 European style pear trees, an Asian pear
      tree, and a plum tree. Curiously this year none of my fruit trees
      flowered, or bore fruit. I have no explanation for this at all. I
      also have a Mexican plum tree which is grown more as an ornamental
      tree than as a fruit tree. This year it also did not flower. I
      would like to add some apple trees, but it may be some time before I
      do that. Someone I know is going to send me some hickory nuts to try
      to grow this fall also.

      Gloria, Texas, US
    • Art Petrzelka
      ... It s a bumper crop this year for a lot of fruit. Since well over half of our food preservation is picked from uncultivated spots, we watch the wild
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 9, 2003
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        On Fri, 2003-08-08 at 04:49, norie wrote:
        > I'd love to hear what type of fruits are being harvested this summer from
        > anyone on this list.

        It's a bumper crop this year for a lot of fruit. Since well over half of
        our food preservation is picked from "uncultivated" spots, we watch the
        wild patches closely.

        The black raspberries growing wild in our ravine were loaded this year.
        My wife picked all that we got this year. I didn't get to pick any, I
        hurt my leg when I forgot about the open spot in the floor of the corn
        crib. It was hard to balance on our sidehills with a gimp leg.

        The blackberries are ready now and are doing good, but the patch is not
        as thick as it used to be.

        The native black cherry trees are ripening. Their fruit is very small,
        but grows in racemes, like a spray of fruit. They are very dark, very
        sweet and mostly seed. I have never been able to pick them before
        because black cherry is a hardwood that grows to 60-80 feet tall. But
        since I quit pasturing a 40 acre patch in my farm, it is growing up in
        cherry.

        Gooseberry - I missed for the same reason as the raspberries. I got a
        few late ones in the woods, though. They have a nice, smooth taste when
        fully ripe.

        Elderberry - another good yielding year. Some are ripening already,
        others are still forming heads. I'm watching my favorites this year so I
        can propagate some. I tried planting seeds a couple of times, and
        learned that digging root suckersw or doing softwood cuttings is much
        easier.

        Wild grapes - thick as usual.

        Wild plum - It will be a very good year for wild plums. Last year, I
        didn't get a gallon. This year, I can get bushels. The wild plum is
        sweet, but astringent. It makes you pucker a bit.

        Honey pears - One tree left over from someone else's farmstead orchard.
        They are small and very sweet.

        Apples - many volunteers all over my hills. We are making apple pectin
        this year with some of the least tasty apples while they are still
        green. I have a volunteer Whitney crabapple, a very nice August eating
        apple, and a winter apple that tastes of wine or cider when ripe, right
        around first frost.

        Concord grape propagates itself all over. I'd like to get some growing
        on trellis.

        Hickory nuts - shagbark and shellbark look like they are forming well.
        The shellbark are much bigger. Tastier than a pecan, but harder to get
        out of the shell.

        Black walnuts are spotty. Some trees don't seem to have much. Last year,
        I filled up my pickup, and could have filled a semi if I could have
        picked them up fast enough.

        Mushrooms. I actually got some morels this spring. Usually, everybody
        else beats me to the mushroooms on my land. I like the fall mushrooms
        better, especially the button mushrooms and oyster mushrooms.

        --

        Art Petrzelka

        Amana, Iowa, USA
      • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
        Hickory nuts - shagbark and shellbark look like they are forming well. The shellbark are much bigger. Tastier than a pecan, but harder to get out of the shell.
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 14, 2003
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          Hickory nuts - shagbark and shellbark look like they are forming well.
          The shellbark are much bigger. Tastier than a pecan, but harder to get
          out of the shell.

          Black walnuts are spotty. Some trees don't seem to have much. Last year,
          I filled up my pickup, and could have filled a semi if I could have
          picked them up fast enough.


          to Art
          i will be interested to exchange the nuts that you are harvesting for filberts or english walnuts that i harvest here ,.
          to all
          i would like this kind of exchange to happens more between peoples interested in quality foods.
          it can help to bypass the food industry that as we know is going to produce more and more crap foods while the real ones are going to be abandonned . it will also enhance the spectrum of foods available to one diet.( in the mean time while our farms become productive... and nuts takes a long time )..
          anyone into it ? i can let people know about what i am proposing ( mostly dried natural meats , nuts mentionned above and dry fruits )

          jean-claude





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
          ... we had salmon berries, thimble berries , trailing blackberries , red huckleberries , different kind of semi wild plums and cherries ( sown by birds ), now
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 14, 2003
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            > I'd love to hear what type of fruits are being harvested this summer from
            > anyone on this list.

            we had salmon berries, thimble berries , trailing blackberries , red huckleberries , different kind of semi wild plums and cherries ( sown by birds ), now it is turn for blacberries ( 2 kinds broad leaves and "deeply cut" leaves )
            soon pears apples, purple plums , filberts and walnuts .
            jean-claude


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Robin, Maya, or Napi
            This is a lovely thought, an exchange of organic foods with others on this list. It was discussed a while back, maybe here, maybe on another list, & then
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 14, 2003
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              This is a lovely thought, an exchange of organic foods with others on this
              list. It was discussed a while back, maybe here, maybe on another list, & then
              fizzled over the laws having to do with mailing foodstuffs or plant matter
              across borders. Not sure that it was impossible, but needed more research for
              each country.

              Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry wrote:

              >
              > Hickory nuts - shagbark and shellbark look like they are forming well.
              > The shellbark are much bigger. Tastier than a pecan, but harder to get
              > out of the shell.
              >
              > Black walnuts are spotty. Some trees don't seem to have much. Last year,
              > I filled up my pickup, and could have filled a semi if I could have
              > picked them up fast enough.
              >
              >
              > to Art
              > i will be interested to exchange the nuts that you are harvesting for
              > filberts or english walnuts that i harvest here ,.
              > to all
              > i would like this kind of exchange to happens more between peoples
              > interested in quality foods.
              > it can help to bypass the food industry that as we know is going to produce
              > more and more crap foods while the real ones are going to be abandonned . it
              > will also enhance the spectrum of foods available to one diet.( in the mean
              > time while our farms become productive... and nuts takes a long time )..
              > anyone into it ? i can let people know about what i am proposing ( mostly
              > dried natural meats , nuts mentionned above and dry fruits )
              >
              > jean-claude
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ingrid Bauer/Jean-Claude Catry
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 14, 2003
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                <This is a lovely thought, an exchange of organic foods with others on this
                list. It was discussed a while back, maybe here, maybe on another list, & then
                fizzled over the laws having to do with mailing foodstuffs or plant matter
                across borders. Not sure that it was impossible, but needed more research for
                each country.>

                i have been doing it for years and didn't enconter much trouble .( just one parcel staying way too long at the customs in sept 91 but delivered anyway .
                jean-claude



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • corfuku
                ... harvesting for filberts or english walnuts that i harvest here ,. ... peoples interested in quality foods. ... to produce more and more crap foods while
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 16, 2003
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                  > to Art
                  > i will be interested to exchange the nuts that you are
                  harvesting for filberts or english walnuts that i harvest here ,.
                  > to all
                  > i would like this kind of exchange to happens more between
                  peoples interested in quality foods.
                  > it can help to bypass the food industry that as we know is going
                  to produce more and more crap foods while the real ones are going to
                  be abandonned . it will also enhance the spectrum of foods available
                  to one diet.( in the mean time while our farms become
                  productive... and nuts takes a long time )..
                  > anyone into it ? i can let people know about what i am proposing
                  ( mostly dried natural meats , nuts mentionned above and dry
                  fruits )
                  >
                  > jean-claude
                  >


                  i have been off the internet for a while.... i like this idea; can
                  anyone tell me when the discussion on food exchanges had been
                  brought up earlier?
                  thanks
                  pavle
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