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Welcome Nakata-san!

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  • norie
    Hello Hide-san (Nakata-san)! Nice to see you on the list. I find that the best way to learn a language is to immerse yourself in a subject of great interest
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 7, 2003
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      Hello Hide-san (Nakata-san)!

      Nice to see you on the list. I find that the best way to learn a language
      is to immerse yourself in a subject of great interest to you - and so for
      you, this is a perfect opportunity here on this list full of helpful and
      kind people!!

      Gloria, thanks for sharing your experience about growing from seed vs.
      growing from seedlings. Does anyone have experience with tropical plants
      such as mango or pinapple? I'd love to be able to grow a mango tree from
      seed, but heard that the life of a mango seed is only a few days.

      I recently saw a video of Fukuoka's visit to India. He was telling the
      people that even on dry land, it's possible to maintain moisture in the
      ground with natural farming his way - and roots will grow far, far down to
      reach the water layer, even if it has to go for several meters.

      Gloria, do you find that your land has more moisture than other surrounding
      areas and you don't need to water much? I can imagine this would be one of
      the strongest arguments for natural farming methods to be practiced in
      nutrient/moisture deficient lands.

      Two weekends ago, I had the honor of listening to Fukuoka-san speak in
      Kyoto. Unforutnately, i could not understand his dialect very well (and
      unfortunately, I also was not in good health that day), but was amazed at
      his stamina and passion to speak to us for 3 hours! The next day, he and
      Honma-san held a seedball making workshop. It was very well attended and I
      must say this experience was more meaningful to me than the lecture. I
      think Fukuoka might agree - we need to act - not just study and discuss why.
      Now I have the power to start my own garden...and all I need is a space to
      grow things (which I'm working on:) )

      I have been meaning to respond to other kind replies to my previous mail so
      hope to get to that soon, too.

      Warm well wishes to all,

      Norie Fukuda
      Central Tokyo, Japan (but hopefully not for much longer!)
    • Gloria C. Baikauskas
      ... vs. ... more moisture than other surrounding ... be one of ... in ... Your welcome, Norie. I think that as a result of my natural farming that my land is
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 8, 2003
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        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "norie" <nfukuda@m...> wrote:
        >>
        > Gloria, thanks for sharing your experience about growing from seed
        vs.
        > growing from seedlings. Gloria, do you find that your land has
        more moisture than other surrounding
        > areas and you don't need to water much? I can imagine this would
        be one of
        > the strongest arguments for natural farming methods to be practiced
        in
        > nutrient/moisture deficient lands.
        > Norie Fukuda

        Your welcome, Norie.

        I think that as a result of my natural farming that my land is
        beginning to show that it does have more moisture than surrounding
        land (neighbors). Please don't laugh. I was cleaning the wading
        pool we have for our dogs to use to cool off in the extreme heat of
        our Texas summers. When I filled it again I sat down in it to enjoy
        its coolness myself. Sitting there quite still I began to notice
        that wasps, dragon flies, and other such insects had become used to
        getting their own drinks from that wading pool. They would swoop
        down beside me and land on the water taking some of it with them as
        they flew back out again. I was fascinated by this as it continued.
        Then I realized that when I started all of this there were no insects
        here besides flies and mosquitoes. I have let much of the land lay
        fallow to let the land heal by itself. The weeds growing here have
        changed as each year passes. I know this is because each weed has a
        purpose for growing where it does. As the land heals the needs
        change, so the weeds change. Now I have wildflowers growing in many
        places put there by the birds, and the wind. Large stands of
        sunflowers grow shading all the area beneath them completely. There
        are now frogs and toads where before there was only bare land and no
        life. I became very pleased watching the insects drink realizing how
        it all came about. I was laying in the bottom of that pool with my
        eyes at about ground level...or maybe a few inches above it. I didn't
        see only weeds around me, nor the areas of grass I planted in the
        very beginning (only a thin strip for walking when there was only mud
        from the dead soil where nothing then did grow). The strips of grass
        have grown larger on their own.

        No....I don't water the grass. I don't water trees transplanted
        after two years. I should change that. I used to water my trees for
        two years. I have been not watering two pecan trees since planting
        them to see what would happen. I had read that if one watered a tree
        very well when it was planted, it could then be left to its own. The
        idea is that the trees will reach for the ground water instead of
        relying on the water they receive from above. The trees are not
        looking really healthy, but they have not died either. The trees
        from seeds I never water.

        I do go on perhaps too much. I hope I answered your questions.
        Gloria
      • ??? ????
        Norie san Thank you for your good advise ,and I think so. After I listned Fukuoka san talking in Kyoto I went to rise field in Nara pref. near by Kyoto. In
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 8, 2003
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          Norie san
          Thank you for your good advise ,and I think so.
          After I listned Fukuoka san talking in Kyoto I went to rise field in Nara
          pref. near by Kyoto.
          In which place I heared nothing. There was a silent world. That was really
          the Silent Summer.
          You know the reason why the field was silent ,don't you?
          I recognized that the Fukuoka farming is just needed in Japan.
          Nakata


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