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  • Gloria C. Baikauskas
    ... Welcome to our group! I could not read your name as it was in characters that did not spell anything in English. I am Gloria. I live in Texas in an area
    Message 1 of 25 , Aug 6, 2003
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      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "¥Ê¥«¥¿¡¡¥Ò¥Ç¥«¥º"
      <hidesun7@m...> wrote:
      > How do you do?
      > For the first time ,I'm writing this mail.
      > I have read 3 mails 2-3days before.
      > I'm a japanese man,born at 1949,living in Yokohama city.
      > I'm interested in the planting in desert and natural farming.
      > My 1st purpose is understanding evryone's opinion or question,
      > 2nd is the progress in English --- writing without dictionary.

      Welcome to our group! I could not read your name as it was in
      characters that did not spell anything in English. I am Gloria. I
      live in Texas in an area that is usually dry and often very hot.
      What I have found so far to be true is the need for trees to base all
      plantings around, and among. This year I dug some swales also to see
      if they might help keep the ground water available to my garden in
      that area. So far it does seem to be the case.

      The trees planted as potted plants seem to take years to grow large
      enough, but the ones grown from seed grow amazingly fast as Fukuoka
      san said they would. I have a two year old hackberry tree near my
      house in its second year from seed that is as tall as my house. I am
      not sure if this is just a very fast growing tree...or the fact that
      it grew from seed. I am grateful to have it grow so quickly,
      though.

      Gloria, Texas
    • debi
      ... Just for the record: Gloria speaks from practical knowledge. What she says, you can believe, because she talks from what she has done, what she knows
      Message 2 of 25 , Aug 6, 2003
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        ---

        Just for the record: Gloria speaks from practical knowledge. What she
        says, you can believe, because she talks from what she has done, what
        she knows first-hand. I know every time I listen to her ,and integrate
        her suggestions into my practice, it has been a good move on my part.

        She also has good manners, as shown by her taking the time to welcome
        you. We all do, but Gloria was good enough to actually specify the
        welcome, and the "Hello". <G>

        Listen to the Lady. She's not afraid to ask practical questions, and
        is happy to share practical answers.

        deb


        In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Gloria C. Baikauskas"
        <gcb49@f...> wrote:

        >
        > The trees planted as potted plants seem to take years to grow large
        > enough, but the ones grown from seed grow amazingly fast as Fukuoka
        > san said they would. I have a two year old hackberry tree near my
        > house in its second year from seed that is as tall as my house. I am
        > not sure if this is just a very fast growing tree...or the fact that
        > it grew from seed. I am grateful to have it grow so quickly,
        > though.
        >
        > Gloria, Texas
      • poppyandeve
        Hi My name is Mark, I live in the UK. I enabled a book called the Harmonious Wheatsmith some years ago which dealt with Marc Bonfil s work - somewhat analagous
        Message 3 of 25 , Nov 1, 2005
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          Hi

          My name is Mark, I live in the UK. I enabled a book called the Harmonious Wheatsmith
          some years ago which dealt with Marc Bonfil's work - somewhat analagous to Fukuoka's
          approach.

          is the this the right place to discuss such work?

          (I should go back through the archives and see but there is so much there that I hesitate to
          begin. My apologies if this is all old hat!)
        • Andres Rattur
          Hello Mark! I haven t heard anything about Harmonious Wheatsmith, but I think that if it s connected somehow with nature-friendly farming or making things
          Message 4 of 25 , Nov 1, 2005
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            Hello Mark!

            I haven't heard anything about Harmonious Wheatsmith, but I think that if
            it's connected somehow with nature-friendly farming or making things better
            in World, then it's welcome! Can you describe this book little more.

            With best whishes,
            Andres Rattur,
            Norway, Averöy!
          • poppyandeve
            ... It details the method for growing wheat (and other European grains) in a permanent clover crop. The varieties suitable have a long T-sum and so can be
            Message 5 of 25 , Nov 1, 2005
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              --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Andres Rattur" <Andre66@h...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello Mark!
              >
              > I haven't heard anything about Harmonious Wheatsmith, but I think that if
              > it's connected somehow with nature-friendly farming or making things better
              > in World, then it's welcome! Can you describe this book little more.
              >
              > With best whishes,
              > Andres Rattur,
              > Norway, Averöy!
              >

              It details the method for growing wheat (and other 'European' grains) in a permanent
              clover crop. The varieties suitable have a long T-sum and so can be planted in mid
              summer to stand 14+ months in the field. up to winter they are tillering and in the new
              growing season they tiller more before giving the grain. The form is of bushes at one
              metre centres. The new crop is planted in amongst the growing bushes and the straw from
              the harvest is left to lie in the fields.

              This is all based on the work of Marc Bonfils, a French national.

              You can get the book from http://www.moodie.biz, or booksellers.
            • vaeltaja@reppu.net
              This method sounds good because of many tillers; you don t need to have many sprouting plants, because each survivor has time to tiller and space to make many
              Message 6 of 25 , Nov 2, 2005
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                This method sounds good because of many tillers; you don't need to have many sprouting plants, because each survivor has time to tiller and space to make many ears.
                Do you know how much up north (or south) it has been used? I ask because for what I have learned, plants tiller much less when days are long. And here (60 degrees N) days are about 20 hours in summer, in sowing time. Risk is that you get only 10 or so tillers.
                How is the sowing done? I did some experiment this autumn, scattering rye and spelt seeds among grass-clover ley. Sprouts did come up, they had enough moisture even though they were not even pressed on the ground. It is possible though that in the summer there would not be enough moisture. I will be waiting next spring to see how the plants survive with clovers and grasses.
                Here is one link on Bonfils' method: http://www.eap.mcgill.ca/CPW_9.htm

                Karri


                > It details the method for growing wheat (and other 'European'
                > grains) in a
                > permanent
                > clover crop. The varieties suitable have a long T-sum and so can be
                > planted
                > in mid
                > summer to stand 14+ months in the field. up to winter they are tillering
                > and in the new
                > growing season they tiller more before giving the grain. The form is of
                > bushes at one
                > metre centres. The new crop is planted in amongst the growing bushes and
                > the straw from
                > the harvest is left to lie in the fields.
                >
                > This is all based on the work of Marc Bonfils, a French national.
                >
                > You can get the book from http://www.moodie.biz, or booksellers.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • poppyandeve
                ... sprouting plants, because each survivor has time to tiller and space to make many ears. ... have learned, plants tiller much less when days are long. And
                Message 7 of 25 , Nov 3, 2005
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                  --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, vaeltaja@r... wrote:
                  >
                  > This method sounds good because of many tillers; you don't need to have many
                  sprouting plants, because each survivor has time to tiller and space to make many ears.
                  > Do you know how much up north (or south) it has been used? I ask because for what I
                  have learned, plants tiller much less when days are long. And here (60 degrees N) days are
                  about 20 hours in summer, in sowing time. Risk is that you get only 10 or so tillers.
                  > How is the sowing done? I did some experiment this autumn, scattering rye and spelt
                  seeds among grass-clover ley. Sprouts did come up, they had enough moisture even
                  though they were not even pressed on the ground. It is possible though that in the
                  summer there would not be enough moisture. I will be waiting next spring to see how the
                  plants survive with clovers and grasses.
                  > Here is one link on Bonfils' method: http://www.eap.mcgill.ca/CPW_9.htm
                  >
                  > Karri

                  HI Karri

                  We have one experiment at around 55?N - the N York moors of England. Marc Bonfils did
                  his work in le Beauce france and worked in the Sahel although I do not know if he did the
                  same wheat work. I suggest that you find a local grain which has not been crossed with a
                  low T sum grain or spring wheat (most modern varieties are crosses with Noah). Is there a
                  seed bank in your area? You may then find a good tillering variety.

                  Seed sowing - well you can try the seed balls method of course. We only managed to get a
                  very few seeds of the old varieties and we grew the using BD preparations as a seed soak
                  and then started them as seedlings in pots since the option of losing the seeds was too
                  hard to face. We have used a McConnel shakerator to rip on the contour and seeded into
                  the path of the tynes but that wasn't very successful. It should be stressed that this is all
                  still experimental so please don't hinder your creativity because of past successes or
                  failures.

                  I think one of the strngths of the method is its resistance to drought. The roots go deep
                  deep deep. The farmer int he N York moors have just had some protein testing on two
                  varieties - 14% ! (This is high as Canadian bread wheats in an area where it is a good year
                  to get 10% by normal techniques). The farm is biodynamic.

                  Mark
                • poppyandeve
                  ... Yes, I forgot ot mention that this is one of the source documents for the Harmonious wheatsmith Thanks Eric van Essche - and Karri Mark
                  Message 8 of 25 , Nov 3, 2005
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                    --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, vaeltaja@r... wrote:

                    > Here is one link on Bonfils' method: http://www.eap.mcgill.ca/CPW_9.htm
                    >
                    > Karri


                    Yes, I forgot ot mention that this is one of the source documents for the Harmonious
                    wheatsmith

                    Thanks Eric van Essche - and Karri

                    Mark
                  • Anders Skarlind
                    Hello Karri where are you situated? I consider making a similar experiment here. Just didn t have enough time this autumn. I sofar know noone who successfully
                    Message 9 of 25 , Nov 3, 2005
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                      Hello Karri
                      where are you situated?
                      I consider making a similar experiment here. Just didn't have enough time
                      this autumn.
                      I sofar know noone who successfully applied Fukuoka's methods /or similar
                      methods) far north, but I would like to know.
                      Anders in Sweden 16E 59N

                      At 19:15 2005-11-02, you wrote:
                      >This method sounds good because of many tillers; you don't need to have
                      >many sprouting plants, because each survivor has time to tiller and space
                      >to make many ears.
                      >Do you know how much up north (or south) it has been used? I ask because
                      >for what I have learned, plants tiller much less when days are long. And
                      >here (60 degrees N) days are about 20 hours in summer, in sowing time.
                      >Risk is that you get only 10 or so tillers.
                      >How is the sowing done? I did some experiment this autumn, scattering rye
                      >and spelt seeds among grass-clover ley. Sprouts did come up, they had
                      >enough moisture even though they were not even pressed on the ground. It
                      >is possible though that in the summer there would not be enough
                      >moisture. I will be waiting next spring to see how the plants survive
                      >with clovers and grasses.
                      >Here is one link on Bonfils' method: http://www.eap.mcgill.ca/CPW_9.htm
                      >
                      >Karri
                    • vaeltaja@reppu.net
                      ... I m in Finland, some 50 km from the south coast. ... I don t know either anybody using Fukuoka s methods. But, using more conventional methods, some
                      Message 10 of 25 , Nov 3, 2005
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                        Anders Skarlind kirjoitti 03.11.2005 kello 15:31:
                        > Hello Karri
                        > where are you situated?

                        I'm in Finland, some 50 km from the south coast.

                        > I consider making a similar experiment here. Just didn't have enough
                        > time
                        > this autumn.
                        > I sofar know noone who successfully applied Fukuoka's methods /or
                        > similar
                        > methods) far north, but I would like to know.
                        > Anders in Sweden 16E 59N

                        I don't know either anybody using Fukuoka's methods. But, using more conventional methods, some experiments have been done using direct seeding machines, sowing direct to ley. Two summers ago one organic farmer did sow summer wheat to growing ley, cutting it right before sowing. He did get something to tresh, but clover did grow through pretty badly. I don't know what happened this summer.

                        Karri
                      • Anders Skarlind
                        Karri, I suppose Midsummer rye (Midsommarråg) is a suitable rye variety. It is adapted to sowing around midsummer, being grazed or mowed the first year to not
                        Message 11 of 25 , Nov 3, 2005
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                          Karri,
                          I suppose Midsummer rye (Midsommarråg) is a suitable rye variety. It is
                          adapted to sowing around midsummer, being grazed or mowed the first year to
                          not get too vigorous, and mounts the second year. It fits Eric van Esche's
                          description of a suitable variety I think.

                          Mark, what is T sum?

                          Anders

                          At 10:00 2005-11-03, you wrote:
                          >I suggest that you find a local grain which has not been crossed with a
                          >low T sum grain or spring wheat (most modern varieties are crosses with
                          >Noah). Is there a
                          >seed bank in your area? You may then find a good tillering variety.
                        • rajutitus lal
                          Seed bals can solve youer problem.Mix so many seeds with clay andmake Balls of half inch dia and scatter here and there even befre season.-Raju and Shalini
                          Message 12 of 25 , Nov 4, 2005
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                            Seed bals can solve youer problem.Mix so many seeds with clay andmake Balls of half inch dia and scatter here and there even befre season.-Raju and Shalini

                            Anders Skarlind <Anders.Skalman@...> wrote:Hello Karri
                            where are you situated?
                            I consider making a similar experiment here. Just didn't have enough time
                            this autumn.
                            I sofar know noone who successfully applied Fukuoka's methods /or similar
                            methods) far north, but I would like to know.
                            Anders in Sweden 16E 59N

                            At 19:15 2005-11-02, you wrote:
                            >This method sounds good because of many tillers; you don't need to have
                            >many sprouting plants, because each survivor has time to tiller and space
                            >to make many ears.
                            >Do you know how much up north (or south) it has been used? I ask because
                            >for what I have learned, plants tiller much less when days are long. And
                            >here (60 degrees N) days are about 20 hours in summer, in sowing time.
                            >Risk is that you get only 10 or so tillers.
                            >How is the sowing done? I did some experiment this autumn, scattering rye
                            >and spelt seeds among grass-clover ley. Sprouts did come up, they had
                            >enough moisture even though they were not even pressed on the ground. It
                            >is possible though that in the summer there would not be enough
                            >moisture. I will be waiting next spring to see how the plants survive
                            >with clovers and grasses.
                            >Here is one link on Bonfils' method: http://www.eap.mcgill.ca/CPW_9.htm
                            >
                            >Karri




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                          • vaeltaja@reppu.net
                            I haven t thought the variety thing much. Midsummer rye might be suitable, as Anders said, and there is some variation in our local winter wheat varieties in
                            Message 13 of 25 , Nov 4, 2005
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                              I haven't thought the variety thing much. Midsummer rye might be suitable, as Anders said, and there is some variation in our local winter wheat varieties in that how easily they start heading on the seeding year, but I have to search for information about their tillering capasity.
                              I have been too lazy making seedballs, and since I aim at sowing of 10+ hectares, I have thought it unpractical to make even thousand(s) kgs seedballs. On the other hand, if it is possible to come down to 1/10th or less in seed amount, maybe then...
                              Karri

                              > I suggest that you find a local grain which has not
                              > been
                              > crossed with a
                              > low T sum grain or spring wheat (most modern varieties are crosses with
                              > Noah). Is there a
                              > seed bank in your area? You may then find a good tillering variety.
                              >
                              > Seed sowing - well you can try the seed balls method of course. We only
                            • abi
                              Hey all, my name is abhi, this is my first post to the group so i think i ll just intro myself. I am an Indian student in Toronto, Canada. I have done much
                              Message 14 of 25 , Jul 31, 2006
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                                Hey all,

                                my name is abhi, this is my first post to the group so i think i'll
                                just intro myself.

                                I am an Indian student in Toronto, Canada. I have done much soul
                                searching in terms of self-awareness and harmonious living in recent
                                years and Fukuoka's words on farming truly appeal to me. I have no
                                previous farming experience so I have joined the community garden on
                                campus and have volunteered at many farms surrounding Toronto on top
                                of my personal research.

                                my intent for the future is to move to Boulder, Colorado and begin my
                                practice of natural farming on a small plot and take life as it comes
                                from there.

                                My hope is to gain (and share) as much as possible to the community's
                                knowledge.

                                With love,
                                ~abhi
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