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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Weeds are good!

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  • Lucia Ruedenberg Wright
    talking about weeds - we spent this past weekend picking blueberries on our land and since it hasn t been farmed for quite a few years by the previous owners,
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 5, 2003
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      talking about weeds - we spent this past weekend picking blueberries on
      our land and since it hasn't been farmed for quite a few years by the
      previous owners, we had to trample through high grasses and alot of weeds
      to get to them! The bushes tend to be surrounded by another bush with
      sweet smelling blossoms that attract bees that I have not yet identified,
      but appears to be a companion plant and yet it makes getting to the
      blueberries so difficult that we had to trample them down and makes me
      want to uproot them. I have to do some research. I was wondering if anyone
      here has experience with blueberries. we're located in northeast
      pennsylvania.

      Lucia

      On 4 Aug 2003, Art Petrzelka wrote:

      > I was reading this book about how certain "deep-diving" weeds enhance
      > the growth of other plants by providing channels through heavy ground
      > for other roots, wick up moisture from deeper earth, and pull mineral
      > nutrients up into the feeding zone of other plants.
      > Weeds: Guardians of the Soil, by Joseph A. Cocannouer
      >
      > http://www.journeytoforever.org/farm_library/weeds/WeedsToC.html
      >
      > If you haven't looked at Journey to Forever, it's a great Web site for
      > non-traditional farmers. And to think that I was feeling bad because I
      > couldn't keep up with the weeds. My Brandywine tomatoes have leaves as
      > big as my hand!
      >

      --
      -lucia
      http://lrw.net
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------
      "No, my friend, the way to have good and safe government, is not to trust
      it all to one, but to divide it among the many, distributing to every one
      exactly the functions he is competent to. It is by dividing and
      subdividing these republics from the national one down through all its
      subordinations, until it ends in the administration of every man's farm by
      himself; by placing under every one what his own eye may superintend, that
      all will be done for the best".
      -- Thomas Jefferson, to Joseph Cabell, 1816
      _________________________________________________________________________

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    • Mark Thomas Nickum
      Surprisingly, the University of Florida (where I am currently) has done more than a little bit of research on blueberries. I don t have a website to send you
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 5, 2003
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        Surprisingly, the University of Florida (where I am currently) has done
        more than a little bit of research on blueberries. I don't have a website
        to send you to off hand, but the extension service makes short
        publications called "EDIS" publications. Try looking up edis, University
        of Florida, and Blueberries up on google and see what you get. And/or UF
        extension service.


        On Tue, 5 Aug 2003, Lucia Ruedenberg Wright wrote:

        > talking about weeds - we spent this past weekend picking blueberries on
        > our land and since it hasn't been farmed for quite a few years by the
        > previous owners, we had to trample through high grasses and alot of weeds
        > to get to them! The bushes tend to be surrounded by another bush with
        > sweet smelling blossoms that attract bees that I have not yet identified,
        > but appears to be a companion plant and yet it makes getting to the
        > blueberries so difficult that we had to trample them down and makes me
        > want to uproot them. I have to do some research. I was wondering if anyone
        > here has experience with blueberries. we're located in northeast
        > pennsylvania.
        >
        > Lucia
        >
        > On 4 Aug 2003, Art Petrzelka wrote:
        >
        > > I was reading this book about how certain "deep-diving" weeds enhance
        > > the growth of other plants by providing channels through heavy ground
        > > for other roots, wick up moisture from deeper earth, and pull mineral
        > > nutrients up into the feeding zone of other plants.
        > > Weeds: Guardians of the Soil, by Joseph A. Cocannouer
        > >
        > > http://www.journeytoforever.org/farm_library/weeds/WeedsToC.html
        > >
        > > If you haven't looked at Journey to Forever, it's a great Web site for
        > > non-traditional farmers. And to think that I was feeling bad because I
        > > couldn't keep up with the weeds. My Brandywine tomatoes have leaves as
        > > big as my hand!
        > >
        >
        > --
        > -lucia
        > http://lrw.net
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > "No, my friend, the way to have good and safe government, is not to trust
        > it all to one, but to divide it among the many, distributing to every one
        > exactly the functions he is competent to. It is by dividing and
        > subdividing these republics from the national one down through all its
        > subordinations, until it ends in the administration of every man's farm by
        > himself; by placing under every one what his own eye may superintend, that
        > all will be done for the best".
        > -- Thomas Jefferson, to Joseph Cabell, 1816
        > _________________________________________________________________________
        >
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        > /\ - against microsoft attachments
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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        >
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      • debi
        ... I don t know about your area, but around here, blueberries and various forms of indigo grow, literally, into each other. Hard to get to the berries,
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 6, 2003
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          ---

          I don't know about your area, but around here, blueberries and various
          forms of indigo grow, literally, into each other. Hard to get to the
          berries, without trampling all over the indigoes. If you go to:
          http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/woodhtml/wCommonIndex.html
          and take a look through both false and true indigoes, or perhaps find
          something else that is close, perhaps we could better find out what is
          there? When you say "bush" that suggests to me a woody or shrubby type
          of growth habit, is that correct?

          There are other bushes I can think of that perhaps may grow close to
          blueberries, who also enjoy the acid soil and thrive in partial shade,
          but the indigoes, at least here, are the ones that seem to be the most
          "familial" -heck, doggone close to"intimate" <G>. The branches of the
          two types intertwine, to be closer to truth. If you could give more
          info, such as leaf type, soil and light, type of soil, color, shape,
          and time of bloom, etc., that might help us track it down. Does the
          shrub have thorns? What color bark does it have? Is it a branching, or
          an "umbrella" type habit? Mutliple stems, like canes, or a central stem?

          In the meantime, anything that supplies bee goodies can't be all bad!
          Feed those Bees! Make them happy critters, and they will love you! <G>
          deb


          In
          fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Lucia Ruedenberg Wright <lucia@l...>
          wrote:
          The bushes tend to be surrounded by another bush with
          > sweet smelling blossoms that attract bees that I have not yet
          identified,
          > but appears to be a companion plant and yet it makes getting to the
          > blueberries so difficult that we had to trample them down and makes me
          > want to uproot them.
          > Lucia
          >
          > On 4 Aug 2003, Art Petrzelka wrote:
          >
          > > I was reading this book about how certain "deep-diving" weeds enhance
          > > the growth of other plants by providing channels through heavy ground
          > > for other roots, wick up moisture from deeper earth, and pull mineral
          > > nutrients up into the feeding zone of other plants.
          > > Weeds: Guardians of the Soil, by Joseph A. Cocannouer
          > >
          > > http://www.journeytoforever.org/farm_library/weeds/WeedsToC.html
          > >
          > > If you haven't looked at Journey to Forever, it's a great Web site for
          > > non-traditional farmers. And to think that I was feeling bad because I
          > > couldn't keep up with the weeds. My Brandywine tomatoes have leaves as
          > > big as my hand!
          > >
          >
          > --
          > -lucia
          > http://lrw.net
          >
          -------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > "No, my friend, the way to have good and safe government, is not to
          trust
          > it all to one, but to divide it among the many, distributing to
          every one
          > exactly the functions he is competent to. It is by dividing and
          > subdividing these republics from the national one down through all its
          > subordinations, until it ends in the administration of every man's
          farm by
          > himself; by placing under every one what his own eye may
          superintend, that
          > all will be done for the best".
          > -- Thomas Jefferson, to Joseph Cabell, 1816
          >
          _________________________________________________________________________
          >
          > () ascii ribbon campaign - against html mail
          > /\ - against microsoft attachments
        • Lucia Ruedenberg Wright
          ... hi Debi - thanks for the url! it s great. I took a look. it is possible that it is an indigo but I don t remember the leaf being so frond-like. it is a
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 6, 2003
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            On Wed, 6 Aug 2003, debi wrote:

            > I don't know about your area, but around here, blueberries and various
            > forms of indigo grow, literally, into each other. Hard to get to the
            > berries, without trampling all over the indigoes. If you go to:
            > http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/woodhtml/wCommonIndex.html
            > and take a look through both false and true indigoes, or perhaps find
            > something else that is close, perhaps we could better find out what is
            > there? When you say "bush" that suggests to me a woody or shrubby type
            > of growth habit, is that correct?

            hi Debi - thanks for the url! it's great. I took a look. it is possible
            that it is an indigo but I don't remember the leaf being so frond-like. it
            is a woody shrubby plant tho and so close I have to trample it down in
            order to get to the berry bush.

            I'll get a picture of it. I'll be away for two weeks.

            -lucia
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