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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Best of the West - Amish

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  • norie
    Hi Jon and all, My wording wasn t quite right on that post, because I meant to say that the farmer s reverence to nature or (/thus) to God is viewable in
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 6, 2003
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      Hi Jon and all,

      My wording wasn't quite right on that post, because I meant to say that the
      farmer's reverence to nature or (/thus) to God is viewable in Japan, not
      only because of the shrine on the farmland, but by the visible use of the
      hand and minimal use of machines. But the scary thing is that there are
      chemicals - and their use is invisible to the untrained eye.

      >: each family learning a
      > craft to aid the community in which they live.

      This is the aspect I search for in Fukuoka philosophy - a sense of
      obligation to our community and the importance of handing down our
      knowledge - to build a society that would support ideas of sustainability
      and the value of nature as something we should not control, but instead
      accommodate ourselves and our lifestyles to. But maybe I'm trying to push
      the envelope too far....

      I'm aware of Fukuoka's charitable efforts all over the world but wonder if
      we could also direct our attention to our own communities at a smaller
      scale. One thing that left the most vivid image from the Japanese TV
      special on Fukuoka farming in Greece was a 5-year old child returning to the
      place where he had helped sow seeds earlier and finding the sprouted
      seedballs. Children are so close to the earth literally and figuratively
      and so if we could teach our children the power of these seedballs, I think
      we could really change the world.

      Sounds to me like we have a lot to learn from the Amish.

      Blessings and peace,

      Norie
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