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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Willow rooting and plant loving

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  • Art Petrzelka
    ... We have a lot of black and silver willow here along the creek bottoms, especially if cattle don t graze them down. What species of willow do you favor? For
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 4, 2003
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      On Tuesday 01 July 2003 00:53, Jon Wood wrote:
      > Mr. Monie: I've used willow water most of my life. In place of the
      > white powder rooting compound (which used to be made from willows, by

      We have a lot of black and silver willow here along the creek bottoms,
      especially if cattle don't graze them down.

      What species of willow do you favor? For that matter, where are you located?
      --
      Art Petrzelka
      Amana, Iowa
    • Jon Wood
      ... What species of willow do you favor? For that matter, where are you located? -- Art Petrzelka Amana, Iowa ************** the closest thing I found at
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 5, 2003
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        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Art Petrzelka <art@c...> >
        What species of willow do you favor? For that matter, where are you
        located?
        --
        Art Petrzelka
        Amana, Iowa
        **************
        the closest thing I found at www.altavista.com on the "river willow"
        was:
        http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/trees/pages/blackwillow.html

        I'm in USA Kentucky: zone 6B
        Jon
      • Art Petrzelka
        ... Very helpful. In fact, I now know that I asked a loaded question! :-) I ll have to try a few rootings with the bark and see how it goes. I ll run my own
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 5, 2003
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          On Saturday 05 July 2003 03:55, Jon Wood wrote:
          > the closest thing I found at www.altavista.com on the "river willow"
          > was:
          > http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/trees/pages/blackwillow.html

          Very helpful. In fact, I now know that I asked a loaded question! :-)

          I'll have to try a few rootings with the bark and see how it goes. I'll run my
          own experiments on which unclassified variety is best!

          Comments on the Web page:
          The comment on the multiplicity of unclassified species helped explain why I
          couldn't decide whether a specific tree was black or silver willow, and why a
          business nearby prefers willow from a certain section of the Iowa River for
          making furniture and baskets.

          In reference to erosion control, it does hold the soil, but it ends up routing
          the stream around it, so that the stream starts winding and making oxbows. It
          appears to me to keep the depth down at the expense of the total area
          covered. But you do get more species in the marsh that is created by the
          willows.

          They are truly spongy trees, soft but strong, in opposition to a boxelder,
          which is brittle and weak. The height of futility is trying to burn a dead
          willow log. It just will not sustain combustion.
          --
          Art Petrzelka
          Amana, Iowa
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