Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

more Best of the 'West' - Science journal ref's to Fukuoka-San

Expand Messages
  • animaphile
    EVEN more core western Science giving some legimitacy to Fukuoka Masanobu! Beauty mate to all, Animaphile Jason ( Web of Science Records Notes: ISI FUKUOKA M*
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 3, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      EVEN more core western Science giving some legimitacy to Fukuoka
      Masanobu!
      Beauty mate to all,
      Animaphile
      Jason

      (
      Web of Science Records
      Notes: ISI FUKUOKA M* search
      ============================================================
      Copyright © 2003 Institute for Scientific Information
      )

      AU PRAKASH, MS
      TI ECOLOGICAL LITERACY FOR MORAL VIRTUE - ORR ON [MORAL] EDUCATION
      FOR POSTMODERN SUSTAINABILITY
      SO JOURNAL OF MORAL EDUCATION
      SN 0305-7240
      AB David Orr's postmodern philosophical investigations begin with
      the recognition that our modern culture is not ecologically
      sustainable; and therefore threatens all life on earth in the
      long term, even as it continues to destroy sustainable cultures
      in the short term. Hopeful of redirecting our civic culture or
      morality, as well as our technologies towards postmodern
      sustainability, Orr proposes an education for ecological
      literacy. This paper examines Orr's account of ecological
      literacy. Following his attempts to take us beyond modern
      literacy, it analyses Orr's conception of moral virtue. It
      concludes with some reflections on Orr's deconstruction of
      professional academic boundaries, including those that continue
      to separate ecological literacy from moral education.
      BP 3
      EP 18
      PG 16
      JI J. Moral Educ.
      PY 1995
      VL 24
      IS 1


      AU Cannon, G
      TI Nutrition: the new world disorder
      SO ASIA PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION
      SN 0964-7058
      AB Scale up 'we are what we eat' and nutrition is revealed as an
      aspect of world governance. The quality and nature of food
      systems has always tended to determine not only the health and
      welfare but also the fate of nations. The independence of
      nations depends on their development of their own human and
      natural resources, including food systems, which, if resilient,
      are indigenous, traditional, or evolved over time to climate,
      terrain and culture. Rapid adoption of untested or foreign food
      systems is hazardous not only to health, but also to security
      and sovereignty. Immediate gain may cause permanent loss.
      Dietary guidelines that recommend strange foods are liable to
      disrupt previous established food cultures. Since the 1960s the
      'green revolution' has increased crop yield, and has also
      accelerated the exodus of hundreds of millions of farmers and
      their families from the land into lives of misery in, mega-
      cities. This is a root cause of increased global inequity,
      instability and violence. 'Free trade' of food, in which value
      is determined by price, is imposed by dominant governments in
      alliance with industry when they believe they can thereby
      control the markets. The World Trade Organization and other
      agencies coordinate the work of transnational corporations that
      are the modem equivalents of the East India companies.
      Scientists should consider the wider dimensions of their work,
      nutrition scientists not least, because of the key place of
      food systems in all societies.
      BP S498
      EP S509
      PG 12
      JI Asia Pac. J. Clin. Nutr.
      PY 2002
      VL 11
      SU S


      AU Zimdahl, RL
      TI Ethics in weed science
      SO WEED SCIENCE
      SN 0043-1745
      AB Weed science, like most sciences, has distanced itself from
      social and ethical discourse in theory and practice. This
      symposium illustrates my point. The 38th meeting of our society
      is the first time there has been a formal discussion of die
      ethical aspects of our work. Weed science, we often believe, is
      value free, as science ought to be. But neither basic nor
      applied weed science is value free; they are value laden.
      Operative values include meeting basic human needs through
      improved Food production, promoting the common good through
      abundant food, improving people's lives through efficient
      production of safe food, achieving agricultural sustainability,
      and increasing efficient food and fiber production and farmer
      profit. Truth pursued via the scientific method is valued and
      respected, as is belief in the goodness of scientific and
      technological progress. Most of these values rest on an ethical
      foundation known as utilitarianism. Most weed scientists and
      their colleagues in agricultural sciences are utilitarian in
      that they believe their work should be useful to humans and
      should promote the greatest good for the greatest number of
      people. What weed scientists believe and stand for and the
      validity of the ethical foundation of their utilitarian
      convictions ought to be central subjects of the weed
      scientist's research and teaching. Ethical reflection does not
      necessarily imply criticism or a need for reform, but it does
      demand intellectual clarity and an ability to affirm who we
      are, what we do, and what we value. Weed scientists should
      engage in an exchange about the ideas that are the end result
      of their experiences and discuss the experiences that give
      shape, substance, and depth to those ideas. In the absence of
      internal ethical reflection and value clarification, external
      distortions-including public criticism-will define the moral
      universe weed scientists must work in. Without embarrassment,
      weed scientists have to learn to ask about the ethical
      foundation of their science.
      BP 636
      EP 639
      PG 4
      JI Weed Sci.
      PY 1998
      PD NOV-DEC
      VL 46
      IS 6


      AU TANE, H
      TI LIVING IN HARMONY WITH NATURE
      SO NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURE
      SN 0028-8241
      BP 53
      EP 56
      PG 4
      PY 1980
      VL 141
      IS 2


      AU Hill, SB
      TI Redesigning agroecosystems for environmental sustainability: A
      deep systems approach
      SO SYSTEMS RESEARCH AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
      SN 1092-7026
      AB Modern agriculture is unsustainable, largely because our
      overemphasis on production, and on its achievement through
      inappropriate physical, chemical and biological manipulation,
      has resulted in the neglect of maintenance functions within
      agroecosystems. This blind spot is one of a number that are
      indicators of our undeveloped and distressed psychosocial
      state. Only by including such factors in our systems analyses
      will it be possible to establish a truly sustainable
      agriculture and food system. (C) 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      BP 391
      EP 402
      PG 12
      JI Syst. Res. Behav. Sci.
      PY 1998
      PD SEP-OCT
      VL 15
      IS 5




      AU Andow, DA
      Hidaka, K
      TI Yield loss in conventional and natural rice farming systems
      SO AGRICULTURE ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRONMENT
      SN 0167-8809
      AB Compared to modern, conventional agriculture, alternative
      agricultural production systems may rely on biologically
      different mechanisms (syndromes) to attain similar production
      goals. Yield loss to rice in conventional and natural farming
      rice paddies in Japan was evaluated by simulated injury (leaf-
      clipping) and monitoring plants damaged by insect herbivores.
      Rice grown under natural farming practices was more tolerant of
      simulated injury and injury from Oulema oryzae than rice grown
      under conventional practices. Natural farming rice retained
      proportionately more tillers and had a higher proportion of
      mature seeds than conventionally grown rice. In conventional
      paddies, the simulated injury may have made the rice plants
      more susceptible to plant pathogens than their non-injured
      counterparts, resulting in higher disease attack and
      proportionately greater yield loss. These results suggest that,
      pests may affect yield loss independently in natural farming,
      but in conventional paddies, multiple pest injury may interact
      synergistically, compounding yield loss. (C) 1998 Elsevier
      Science B.V. All rights reserved.
      BP 151
      EP 158
      PG 8
      JI Agric. Ecosyst. Environ.
      PY 1998
      PD OCT
      VL 70
      IS 2-3





      AU ANDOW, DA
      HIDAKA, K
      TI EXPERIMENTAL NATURAL-HISTORY OF SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE -
      SYNDROMES OF PRODUCTION
      SO AGRICULTURE ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRONMENT
      SN 0167-8809
      BP 447
      EP 462
      PG 16
      JI Agric. Ecosyst. Environ.
      PY 1989
      PD NOV
      VL 27
      IS 1-4


      AU COBB, CW
      TI FOOD AND THE CHRISTIAN FAITH
      SO RELIGION IN LIFE
      SN 0034-3986
      BP 65
      EP 71
      PG 7
      PY 1980
      VL 49
      IS 1



      AU CONVISER, R
      TI TOWARD AGRICULTURES OF CONTEXT
      SO ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
      SN 0163-4275
      BP 71
      EP 85
      PG 15
      JI Environ. Ethics
      PY 1984
      VL 6
      IS 1


      AU DABNEY, SM
      BREITENBECK, GA
      GRIFFIN, JL
      HOFF, BJ
      TI SUBTERRANEAN CLOVER COVER CROP USED TO INCREASE RICE YIELD
      SO AGRONOMY JOURNAL
      SN 0002-1962
      BP 483
      EP 487
      PG 5
      JI Agron. J.
      PY 1989
      PD MAY-JUN
      VL 81
      IS 3


      PT Journal
      AU DEVALL, B
      SESSIONS, G
      TI THE DEVELOPMENT OF NATURAL-RESOURCES AND THE INTEGRITY OF
      NATURE
      SO ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
      SN 0163-4275
      BP 293
      EP 322
      PG 30
      JI Environ. Ethics
      PY 1984
      VL 6
      IS 4


      AU EDWARDS, CA
      GROVE, TL
      HARWOOD, RR
      COLFER, CJP
      TI THE ROLE OF AGROECOLOGY AND INTEGRATED FARMING SYSTEMS IN
      AGRICULTURAL SUSTAINABILITY
      SO AGRICULTURE ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRONMENT
      SN 0167-8809
      AB Maintenance of biological diversity and nutrient cycling
      mechanisms are global principles that are common to all
      agroecosystems and therefore essential in the design of
      sustainable agricultural systems. Regional or site-specific
      factors include climate, soils and socio-economic preferences
      and conditions. These regional factors differ greatly among
      agroecosystems and may assume major importance in some.
      Research and development on global commonalities has
      potentially the most universal impact across all
      agroecosystems. Interdisciplinarity, participation of farmers
      and a whole farm level approach are fundamental to such
      research and development.
      BP 99
      EP 121
      PG 23
      JI Agric. Ecosyst. Environ.
      PY 1993
      PD SEP
      VL 46
      IS 1-4


      AU Gutman, BN
      TI Ethical eating: Applying the kosher food regulatory regime to
      organic food
      SO YALE LAW JOURNAL
      SN 0044-0094
      BP 2351
      EP 2384
      PG 34
      JI Yale Law J.
      PY 1999
      PD JUN
      VL 108
      IS 8


      AU Hidaka, K
      TI Community structure and regulatory mechanism of pest
      populations in rice paddies cultivated under intensive,
      traditionally organic and lower input organic farming in Japan
      SO BIOLOGICAL AGRICULTURE & HORTICULTURE
      SN 0144-8765
      AB Three different rice production systems in the Chugoku district
      of southwestern Japan were compared to characterize differences
      in the arthropod community structures and insect pest
      regulatory mechanisms. In older traditionally organic rice
      paddy fields, Nilaparvata lugens was uncommon and was
      controlled by the sedentary nematode parasite, Agamermis unka.
      In contrast, in intensively farmed rice paddies, N. lugens was
      very abundant and A. unka was absent. There were no differences
      between the intensive paddies and younger traditional paddies.
      In addition, differences of abundance in spider and collembola
      populations were not clear in these paddies. In lower-input
      organic farming systems with no-tillage and winter legume
      mulch, Sogatella furcifera was much less abundant, and the most
      important predators, sedentary lycosids, were much more
      abundant than in the traditionally managed paddy. Densities of
      N. lugens were similar, but A. unka was not present in the
      lower-input organic systems. These sedentary natural enemies
      were more abundant in paddy fields farmed with less soil
      surface disturbance.
      BP 35
      EP 49
      PG 15
      JI Biol. Agric. Hortic.
      PY 1997
      VL 15
      IS 1-4



      PT Journal
      AU HILL, SB
      MACRAE, RJ
      TI ORGANIC FARMING IN CANADA
      SO AGRICULTURE ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRONMENT
      SN 0167-8809
      AB Although interest in organic farming in Canada has been
      growing, many obstacles to its development remain. The supply
      of produce is low and distribution systems are undeveloped.
      Consumer demand, however, appears to be strong, particularly in
      urban areas. The Federal Government and some provincial
      governments are beginning to examine how their policies and
      programs impede the transition to sustainable agriculture. Some
      programs dealing with transition, market development and
      certification have been developed to help facilitate the
      evolution of the organic sector. Also, some training programs
      in organic farming are now available, and research and
      development projects have started recently in several
      universities. A much more comprehensive package of
      institutional supports, however, will be required for these
      systems to develop in an orderly fashion and to realize their
      full potential.
      BP 71
      EP 84
      PG 14
      JI Agric. Ecosyst. Environ.
      PY 1992
      PD MAR 31
      VL 39
      IS 1-2


      AU KEFFER, S
      KING, S
      KRAFT, S
      TI PROCESS METAPHYSICS AND MINIMALISM - IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC-
      POLICY
      SO ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
      SN 0163-4275
      AB Using process philosophy, especially its view of nature and its
      ethic, we develop a process-based environmental ethic embodying
      minimalism and beneficience. From this perspective, we
      criticize the philosophy currently underlying public policy and
      examine some alternative approaches based on phenomenology and
      ethnomethodology. We conclude that process philosophy, minus
      its value hierarchy, is a powerful tool capable of supporting
      both radical and moderate changes in environmental policy.
      BP 23
      EP 47
      PG 25
      JI Environ. Ethics
      PY 1991
      PD SPR
      VL 13
      IS 1


      AU MACRAE, RJ
      HILL, SB
      MEHUYS, GR
      HENNING, J
      TI FARM-SCALE AGRONOMIC AND ECONOMIC CONVERSION FROM CONVENTIONAL
      TO SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE
      SO ADVANCES IN AGRONOMY
      SN 0065-2113
      BP 155
      EP 198
      PG 44
      JI Adv. Agron.
      PY 1990
      VL 43



      AU NADKARNI, MV
      TI CRISIS OF INCREASING COSTS IN AGRICULTURE - IS THERE A WAY OUT
      SO ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL WEEKLY
      SN 0012-9976
      BP A114
      EP A119
      PG 6
      JI Econ. Polit. Week.
      PY 1988
      PD SEP 24
      VL 23
      IS 39



      AU PAGE, SLJ
      BRIDGE, J
      TI PLANT NEMATODES AND SUSTAINABILITY IN TROPICAL AGRICULTURE
      SO EXPERIMENTAL AGRICULTURE
      SN 0014-4797
      AB Although plant nematodes are ubiquitous and pathogenic to a
      wide range of crops, research into these pests in the tropics
      has been concentrated on commodity crops. While modern
      intensive tropical agriculture has become unsustainable and
      often relies on the use of toxic nematicides to control
      damaging populations of plant nematodes, many traditional
      subsistence farmers have been able to suppress nematodes by
      promoting crop diversity and selecting for tolerance and
      resistance. This paper gives examples of sustainable systems
      which suppress nematodes. Other examples of once sustainable
      systems in which nematode problems now occur are discussed and
      reasons for this instability suggested. The need for farmers to
      retain responsibility for the development of sustainable
      systems is stressed. Nematologists and other plant
      protectionists are encouraged to take a wider view of the
      complex issues that affect the sustainability of agriculture in
      the tropics.
      BP 139
      EP 154
      PG 16
      JI Exp. Agric.
      PY 1993
      PD APR
      VL 29
      IS 2



      AU PORRITT, J
      TI EDUCATION FOR LIFE ON EARTH
      SO GEOGRAPHY
      SN 0016-7487
      BP 1
      EP 8
      PG 8
      JI Geography
      PY 1988
      PD JAN
      VL 73
      IS 318
      PN 1


      AU Shimazono, S
      TI Alternative knowledge movements as religion: An alternative
      farming movement in Japan
      SO SOCIAL COMPASS
      SN 0037-7686
      BP 47
      EP 63
      PG 17
      JI Soc. Compass
      PY 1996
      PD MAR
      VL 43
      IS 1


      AU Stinner, DH
      Stinner, BR
      Martsolf, E
      TI Biodiversity as an organizing principle in agroecosystem
      management: Case studies of holistic resource management
      practitioners in the USA
      SO AGRICULTURE ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRONMENT
      SN 0167-8809
      AB Holistic Resource Management (HRM) is a process of goal
      setting, decision making and monitoring which integrates
      social, ecological and economic factors. Biodiversity
      enhancement is a fundamental principle in HRM and students are
      taught that biodiversity is the foundation of sustainable
      profit. In the HRM process, practitioners develop a holistic
      goal which includes: (1) quality of life values, (2) forms of
      production to support those values, and (3) landscape planning,
      which should protect and enhance biodiversity and support
      ecosystem processes of succession, energy flow, hydrological
      and nutrient cycling, We present an overview of the HRM model
      and results of interviews with 25 HRM farmers and ranchers from
      across the USA in which perceptions and experiences with
      respect to the role of biodiversity in the sustainability of
      their operations were explored. An ethnographic approach and
      qualitative research methods were used in the interviews. While
      only 9% of the interviewees reported thinking about
      biodiversity in the context of their operations before being
      exposed to HRM, now all of them think biodiversity is important
      to the sustainability of their farms and ranches. Of the people
      interviewed, 95% perceived increases in biodiversity
      (particularly with respect to plants) and 80% perceived
      increase in profits from their land since HRM began influencing
      their decisions. In addition to perceiving increases in
      biodiversity, all of the interviewees reported observing
      indications of positive changes in some of the ecosystem
      processes on their farms or ranches. In addition, 91% of the
      interviewees reported improvements in their quality of life
      because of changes in their time budgets. Three of the
      interviewees who had quantitative data on changes in numbers of
      plant species and economic indicators are discussed in detail.
      We conclude that holistic management approaches like HRM are
      worthy of further study. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.
      BP 199
      EP 213
      PG 15
      JI Agric. Ecosyst. Environ.
      PY 1997
      PD APR
      VL 62
      IS 2-3


      AU WAGSTAFF, H
      TI HUSBANDRY METHODS AND FARM SYSTEMS IN INDUSTRIALIZED COUNTRIES
      WHICH USE LOWER LEVELS OF EXTERNAL INPUTS - A REVIEW
      SO AGRICULTURE ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRONMENT
      SN 0167-8809
      BP 1
      EP 27
      PG 27
      JI Agric. Ecosyst. Environ.
      PY 1987
      PD MAY
      VL 19
      IS 1



      AU WHITE, JG
      SCOTT, TW
      TI EFFECTS OF PERENNIAL FORAGE-LEGUME LIVING MULCHES ON NO-TILL
      WINTER-WHEAT AND RYE
      SO FIELD CROPS RESEARCH
      SN 0378-4290
      AB No-till winter cereals sown in narrow rows may compete
      successfully with perennial forage-legume living mulches that
      can fix nitrogen (N), conserve soil, increase dry-matter
      production, and suppress weeds. The effects of small-grain
      species, mulch species, and top-dress N on grain and mulch
      yield and the grain N concentration of winter cereals direct-
      drilled into legume living mulches were examined in a two-year
      field study in New York, U.S.A., on soils of the Lima and
      Kendaia series: fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Glossoboric and Aeric
      Hapludalfs. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) or rye (Secale
      cereale L.) were grown in monoculture or drilled into summer-
      established plots of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), birdsfoot
      trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.), crownvetch (Coronilla varia
      L.), ladino clover (Trifolium repens L. forma lodigense Hort
      ex. Gams), red clover (T. pratense L.), or white clover (T.
      repens L.). Spring top-dress N was applied at 0 or 56 kg N ha-
      1. Cereals were reseeded for a second season. Mulches
      generally interfered more and yielded more with wheat than with
      rye. Birdsfoot trefoil, crownvetch, and white clover had
      little effect on grain-yield the first year; birdsfoot trefoil
      and crownvetch interfered strongly with cereals the second
      year. Red clover did not affect rye grain-yield in the absence
      of top-dress N, but did tend to reduce wheat yield. Top-dress
      N increased cereal grain-yield and decreased mulch yield. In
      general, legume mulches did not appear to enhance cereal N
      nutrition the first year; red and white clovers appeared to
      contribute N to rye the second year. Second-year grain-yields
      were generally lower than first-year yields, due to increased
      interference from living mulches and broadleaf weeds. All
      living mulches except crownvetch suppressed weeds the second
      year. The results indicate that some species of perennial
      forage legumes may be suitable for use as living mulches for
      direct-drilled small grains, especially tall early winter
      cereals.
      BP 135
      EP 148
      PG 14
      JI Field Crop. Res.
      PY 1991
      PD DEC
      VL 28
      IS 1-2
    • jamie
      Thanks Jason for the many, very useful papers you list. Considering the vast amounts of material included (and no doubt the even greater amount that none of us
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 3, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks Jason for the many, very useful papers you list. Considering the vast
        amounts of material included (and no doubt the even greater amount that none
        of us have ever seen or heard reference too) is it not possible that the
        West might actually be part of the solution to the situation it has itself
        created?

        Further, just as with my invention of the story that vegetarianism etc might
        only be the expression of a culture obsessed with diet, so our need to
        situate in non-occidental peoples (their cultural parctices and/or writings
        if they have them) a solution to the problems created in most part in the
        occident, could be considered a story of the loss of confidence in that
        culture. So what, you might rightly retort! Well the longer story of this
        story could be that in our search elsewhere for answers there is also the
        attempted escape from the fear of these problems - that the search elsewhere
        will miss the solution immanent in the problematic practices themselves:

        "But where there is danger, there also grows the strength, the agency of
        salvation" Holderlin.

        Jamie
        Souscayrous
      • Art Petrzelka
        ... Orr s book is recommended in the Contrary Farmer book by Gene Logsdon. -- Art Petrzelka Amana, Iowa
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 3, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          On Thursday 03 July 2003 02:35, animaphile wrote:
          > TI ECOLOGICAL LITERACY FOR MORAL VIRTUE - ORR ON [MORAL] EDUCATION
          > FOR POSTMODERN SUSTAINABILITY
          > SO JOURNAL OF MORAL EDUCATION
          > SN 0305-7240
          > AB David Orr's postmodern philosophical investigations begin with

          Orr's book is recommended in the Contrary Farmer book by Gene Logsdon.
          --
          Art Petrzelka
          Amana, Iowa
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.