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[fukuoka_farming] Re: Barrier cloth

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  • Stephen Inniss
    Thank you for your advice, Gloria. It may be that what you have heard is right. The land just down-slope if the orchard is soggy all winter. I had reasons for
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 28, 2003
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      Thank you for your advice, Gloria. It may be that what you have heard is
      right. The land just down-slope if the orchard is soggy all winter. I
      had reasons for thinking this is natural, but now I'll have to add the
      possibility that the water that can't penetrate the barrier cloth is
      running along the surface during the winter rains.

      So, I'll compromise between doing something and doing nothing. I'll
      spread the effort over several years. Each time I acquire a shrub and
      add it to the orchard's understory I'll take up the barrier cloth in a
      very wide circle around it, and seed the ground with clover (and
      possibly other plants). When I've planted the last shrubs, then I'll
      convert the remaining areas as well. With any luck this will restore the
      soil's ability to breathe and drink without destroying too many of the
      trees' feeder roots all at once. I'll let the group know how well this
      works.

      By the way, all of the areas I dug out the barrier cloth and planted
      with clover are doing well. This is true of the vegetable garden, some
      patches of what are now (and temporarily) lawn, and a patch of ground
      that was formerly covered with plastic and barrier cloth at the edge of
      the woods (there I added not only clover but some transplants of lemon
      balm, feverfew, centaurea, creeping rasberry, and some volunteer holly,
      laurel and hazelnut seedlings). We haven't had significant rain in over
      6 weeks, and in every case the clover and the plants living with it are
      a pleasant green contrast to the withering brown areas beside them. I
      think that the clover is not only thriving of itself but also somehow
      helping the other plants along. My guess would be that it is providing
      better cover, and that it might be drawing up extra subsurface moisture
      (plus possibly "leaking" extra nitrogen). Score one for Fukuoka's
      confidence in clover!

      Stephen

      "Gloria C. Baikauskas" wrote:

      >
      > My thought is that you will need to penetrate that barrier cloth in
      > several places, if you do choose not to remove it, and make large
      > holes in it...basically removing pieces of it....so that water can go
      > through the normal way to the underground drainage as it should.
      > Gloria
      >
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