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Re:no-till

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  • flylo@txcyber.com
    I m interested in this method also. However, my garden plot is actually a small section in a neglected 18 acre field. I realized that by tilling, we would be
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 1, 2002
      I'm interested in this method also. However, my 'garden plot' is
      actually a small section in a neglected 18 acre field. I realized that
      by tilling, we would be bringing up 10+ years of weed seeds plus
      the grass that had established over the years. How do you go no-
      till with all this?
      I understand the method and means after plants have been
      established in the soil (snipping off weeds at the base, allowing
      their roots to feed and brace the soil), feeding the garden through a
      cover of mulch, etc. But where is the starting point? Just plant
      through the growing grass and weeds and figure the soil is healthy
      enough to support all? Mowing it all down to ground level and
      mulching over the resulting areas?
      I wouldn't mind doing some field tests using both tilling and no till
      experimental plots, but need a definite 'how to' starting point.
      Martha, also in Texas
    • burt levy
      --One way to get rid of weeds and seeds on a relatively small area, is to cover the area with thick, clear plastic sheeting. When the temperature gets into the
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 1, 2002
        --One way to get rid of weeds and seeds on a
        relatively small area, is to cover the area with
        thick, clear plastic sheeting. When the temperature
        gets into the 80s, (which I believe probably occurs in
        Texas in early March) you can put down the plastic and
        seal the edges with dirt.The sun goes through the
        plastic and heats up the soil. The plastic holds the
        heat in. It then builds up in the soil and heats up
        the soil for a couple of feet. The soil heats up well
        over 100 degrees. This kills plants, roots, seeds,
        microbes etc. Of course the soil is sterilized. But
        then you can introduce your cover crop and other
        desired plants which will renourish the soil. You will
        then have a head start on the weeds. Keep the plastic
        on for 3 weeks, pull off then plant. This probably
        won't work in cooler climates, but should work in
        Texas ,Calif. etc.flylo@... wrote:
        > I'm interested in this method also. However, my
        > 'garden plot' is
        > actually a small section in a neglected 18 acre
        > field. I realized that
        > by tilling, we would be bringing up 10+ years of
        > weed seeds plus
        > the grass that had established over the years. How
        > do you go no-
        > till with all this?
        > I understand the method and means after plants have
        > been
        > established in the soil (snipping off weeds at the
        > base, allowing
        > their roots to feed and brace the soil), feeding the
        > garden through a
        > cover of mulch, etc. But where is the starting
        > point? Just plant
        > through the growing grass and weeds and figure the
        > soil is healthy
        > enough to support all? Mowing it all down to ground
        > level and
        > mulching over the resulting areas?
        > I wouldn't mind doing some field tests using both
        > tilling and no till
        > experimental plots, but need a definite 'how to'
        > starting point.
        > Martha, also in Texas
        >


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      • GLORIA BAIKAUSKAS
        Spreading corn gluten meal in February will prevent any seeds from germinating weeds that are annuals. Of course new seeds won t grow there for a while
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 1, 2002
          Spreading corn gluten meal in February will prevent any seeds from germinating weeds that are annuals. Of course new seeds won't grow there for a while either, but it will be a while before you plant outdoors anyway. It is a great fertilizer, too.
          Gloria


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ban
          martha It depends how small is your gardened area. I started marking 5 feet wide beds for vegetables. did the sowing or transplanting among the scrub and as
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 4, 2002
            martha
            It depends how small is your gardened area.
            I started marking 5 feet wide beds for vegetables.
            did the sowing or transplanting among the scrub and as the plants grew,
            I cut the scrub gradually back by hand. It was a very smooth
            transition, made possible because I started small.
            francisco

            Remitente: flylo@... But where is the starting point? Just
            plant
            > through the growing grass and weeds and figure the soil is healthy
            > enough to support all? Mowing it all down to ground level and
            > mulching over the resulting areas?
          • Robert Waldrop
            We are converting our lawn to forest garden by laying out plots outlined with firewood. We then put down grass clippings and leaves, then several layers of
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 4, 2002
              We are converting our lawn to forest garden by laying out plots
              outlined with firewood. We then put down grass clippings and leaves,
              then several layers of newspaper, then some more grass clippings and
              leaves and then dirt on top. This is working very well for us.

              Robert Waldrop, Oklahoma City
              http://www.bettertimesinfo.org

              -----Original Message-----
              From: flylo@... <flylo@...>
              >I'm interested in this method also. However, my 'garden plot' is
              >actually a small section in a neglected 18 acre field. I realized
              that
              >by tilling, we would be bringing up 10+ years of weed seeds plus
              >the grass that had established over the years. How do you go no-
              >till with all this?
              >I understand the method and means after plants have been
              >established in the soil (snipping off weeds at the base, allowing
              >their roots to feed and brace the soil), feeding the garden through a
              >cover of mulch, etc. But where is the starting point? Just plant
              >through the growing grass and weeds and figure the soil is healthy
              >enough to support all? Mowing it all down to ground level and
              >mulching over the resulting areas?
              >I wouldn't mind doing some field tests using both tilling and no till
              >experimental plots, but need a definite 'how to' starting point.
              >Martha, also in Texas
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