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Anerobic Compost

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  • John Warner
    In the spirit of Mr. Fukuoka s no-work gardening and farming I never make compost. I have always considered doing things that happen of themselves anyway a
    Message 1 of 1 , May 15 12:00 PM
      In the spirit of Mr. Fukuoka's no-work gardening and farming I never
      make compost. I have always considered doing things that happen of
      themselves anyway a waste of time--like trying to make water run
      downhill. Yet I get some anerobic decomposition just the same and
      consider it valuable.

      I sheet mulch perhaps as much as 100 tons of leaves, grassclippings
      and related wastes a year brought by two full-time maintenance
      gardeners. They dump it in front of the house and if I'm not on the
      ball and get it moved within a day or two, the grassclippings in
      particular will turn to slime. Mulch put in the low interbeds also
      gets stinky and slimy in the winter especially where the hardpan is
      high. But in the end, when it dries out, it makes a rather good
      material. It can be difficult to handle though. Not only is it
      stinky, it's trecherous underfoot. I once landed right on my duff in
      a material not much unlide fresh cowpuck. Another problem with it is
      that it coalesces into putrid, dense sheets that are hard to break
      apart.
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