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  • Larry Haftl
    Hi again, And to keep the balance between philosophy and practicallity... Actually trying to apply Fukuoka-san s principles is NOT easy. I m all charged up,
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 4, 2003
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      Hi again,

      And to keep the balance between philosophy and practicallity...

      Actually trying to apply Fukuoka-san's principles is NOT easy. I'm all
      charged up, plan firmly in hand, ready to start turning my weed patch into a
      natural garden and all I'm getting is rain again. I'm ready to start maing
      the raised beds but when I go out to the area the ground keeps yelling at me
      NOT YET! I'M TOO WET!

      I finally decided to use grass straw for mulch and the core of some of the
      beds. The decision was made because that is what I have readily available to
      me (farmer down the road who doesn't use herbicides has bales at a
      reasonable price). The recent discussion on mulch alternative was really
      thought-provoking, but I think what it ultimately comes down to is what is
      available that is suitable. In my case it was the grass straw. In Jamie's it
      was the marc (boy I wish I had some of that available here). Others use
      leaves (almost all of my trees are evergreens). I might have been able to
      get something more "exotic" such as hardwood chips or rice hulls or
      whatever, but they would not have been from a local source and would have
      cost a lot more. As it is, the farmer is going to drop some bales off at my
      place as he takes a load up to the local feed store.

      I still have a lot of grasses and weeds in the yard, but the problem has
      diminished greatly when I realized that I didn't have a yard full of weeds,
      I had a yard full of forage for the chickens (and now I've got 58 12-week
      old chickens about to be put to work as organic lawnmowers). I still face a
      lot of grass encroachment on the raised beds area, but I'm hoping that deep
      straw mulch and rotated cover crops will keep the wild grasses and weeds
      from totally dominating that area. I finally decided that I will always have
      some weeds and wild grasses and that is OK. I'll just have to learn how to
      collaborate with them to make us all happy.

      One thing I keep realizing is that "this is now and that is then". By that I
      mean that it is very natural for vegetation to change over time as
      conditions change. If I don't particularly like what I've got right now it
      doesn't worry me too much as I know that what I will have will be different
      from what is there now. This is true whether I do something to an area or
      not, so all I plan to do is to see if I can encourage the changes to result
      in something more edible/beneficial than what is there now. I think the key
      lies in thinking about it all in terms of years rather than seasons, and in
      influencing rather than controlling how and where it is going.

      Something else quite unexpected has also crept into all of this. Seed
      saving. When I started to think of growing things from seed to seed
      (self-sustainability) there was a very subtle shift in the way I thought
      about growing anything. Fits right in with that collaboration versus control
      thing. It's one thing to plant and grow something in order to harvest the
      edible parts, and something quite different to grow something not only for
      edible parts, but also to enable the plant to reproduce for next season or
      year (and the one after that and the one after that). Changes not only how
      you will plant/cultivate but also what you will plant. When I let my mind
      really go on this I got to the point where I'm even willing to plant hybrid
      seeds knowing that the seeds they produce will not bear similar plants next
      time. Adds a very delightful and adventurous element to the mix.

      And almost completely unrelated to all of that... ducks and geese need
      water. It is not healthy or natural for them to live without a pond or lake
      of some sort. And when you raise ducks or geese or chickens for food they
      are not friends or pets. They are food. My chickens will be able to live as
      rich, natural, protected, and stressless a life as I can possibly provide
      for them all the way to my freezer.

      And finally, I apologize for not updating the website very much of late. It
      really has been a very busy time and something had to drop down on the
      priority list. But thanks to the rain and finishing all of the rush
      articles, I'll be trying to catch up this weekend.

      Larry Haftl
      larry@...
      http://LarryHaftl.com
      http://FukuokaFarmingOL.net
    • Catherine Dionisi
      Larry, What is the marc which Jamie is using ? Catherine ... De : Larry Haftl [mailto:larry@larryhaftl.com] Envoyé : samedi 5 avril 2003 09:46 À :
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 5, 2003
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        Larry,

        What is the "marc" which Jamie is using ?

        Catherine

        -----Message d'origine-----
        De : Larry Haftl [mailto:larry@...]
        Envoy� : samedi 5 avril 2003 09:46
        � : fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Objet : [fukuoka_farming] on the ground




        Hi again,

        And to keep the balance between philosophy and practicallity...

        Actually trying to apply Fukuoka-san's principles is NOT easy. I'm all
        charged up, plan firmly in hand, ready to start turning my weed patch
        into
        a
        natural garden and all I'm getting is rain again. I'm ready to start
        maing
        the raised beds but when I go out to the area the ground keeps yelling
        at
        me
        NOT YET! I'M TOO WET!

        I finally decided to use grass straw for mulch and the core of some of
        the
        beds. The decision was made because that is what I have readily
        available
        to
        me (farmer down the road who doesn't use herbicides has bales at a
        reasonable price). The recent discussion on mulch alternative was really
        thought-provoking, but I think what it ultimately comes down to is what
        is
        available that is suitable. In my case it was the grass straw. In
        Jamie's
        it
        was the marc (boy I wish I had some of that available here). Others use
        leaves (almost all of my trees are evergreens). I might have been able
        to
        get something more "exotic" such as hardwood chips or rice hulls or
        whatever, but they would not have been from a local source and would
        have
        cost a lot more. As it is, the farmer is going to drop some bales off at
        my
        place as he takes a load up to the local feed store.

        I still have a lot of grasses and weeds in the yard, but the problem has
        diminished greatly when I realized that I didn't have a yard full of
        weeds,
        I had a yard full of forage for the chickens (and now I've got 58
        12-week
        old chickens about to be put to work as organic lawnmowers). I still
        face a
        lot of grass encroachment on the raised beds area, but I'm hoping that
        deep
        straw mulch and rotated cover crops will keep the wild grasses and weeds
        from totally dominating that area. I finally decided that I will always
        have
        some weeds and wild grasses and that is OK. I'll just have to learn how
        to
        collaborate with them to make us all happy.

        One thing I keep realizing is that "this is now and that is then". By
        that
        I
        mean that it is very natural for vegetation to change over time as
        conditions change. If I don't particularly like what I've got right now
        it
        doesn't worry me too much as I know that what I will have will be
        different
        from what is there now. This is true whether I do something to an area
        or
        not, so all I plan to do is to see if I can encourage the changes to
        result
        in something more edible/beneficial than what is there now. I think the
        key
        lies in thinking about it all in terms of years rather than seasons, and
        in
        influencing rather than controlling how and where it is going.

        Something else quite unexpected has also crept into all of this. Seed
        saving. When I started to think of growing things from seed to seed
        (self-sustainability) there was a very subtle shift in the way I thought
        about growing anything. Fits right in with that collaboration versus
        control
        thing. It's one thing to plant and grow something in order to harvest
        the
        edible parts, and something quite different to grow something not only
        for
        edible parts, but also to enable the plant to reproduce for next season
        or
        year (and the one after that and the one after that). Changes not only
        how
        you will plant/cultivate but also what you will plant. When I let my
        mind
        really go on this I got to the point where I'm even willing to plant
        hybrid
        seeds knowing that the seeds they produce will not bear similar plants
        next
        time. Adds a very delightful and adventurous element to the mix.

        And almost completely unrelated to all of that... ducks and geese need
        water. It is not healthy or natural for them to live without a pond or
        lake
        of some sort. And when you raise ducks or geese or chickens for food
        they
        are not friends or pets. They are food. My chickens will be able to live
        as
        rich, natural, protected, and stressless a life as I can possibly
        provide
        for them all the way to my freezer.

        And finally, I apologize for not updating the website very much of late.
        It
        really has been a very busy time and something had to drop down on the
        priority list. But thanks to the rain and finishing all of the rush
        articles, I'll be trying to catch up this weekend.

        Larry Haftl
        larry@...
        http://LarryHaftl.com
        http://FukuokaFarmingOL.net




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      • Larry Haftl
        Hi Catherine, ... I believe it s the stuff that is left over from pressing grapes for wine. Larry Haftl larry@larryhaftl.com http://LarryHaftl.com
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 5, 2003
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          Hi Catherine,

          > What is the "marc" which Jamie is using ?

          I believe it's the stuff that is left over from pressing grapes for wine.

          Larry Haftl
          larry@...
          http://LarryHaftl.com
          http://FukuokaFarmingOL.net
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