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Re: [fukuoka_farming] bacteria and mycorrhiza

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  • Steve Walpole
    Ladies and gentleman, I d just like to say that I have had a wonderful time on this site listening and sharing idea s over the last 6mths or so. Its time for
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 16, 2003
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      Ladies and gentleman,

      I'd just like to say that I have had a wonderful time on this site listening and sharing idea's over the last 6mths or so.

      Its time for me to continue concretising all the theory and practical advice that everyone has shared.

      So farewell, I wish you peace on your journey of farming.

      Sayonara,

      Steve.
      The school of momentary farming !
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: jamie
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, March 14, 2003 9:32 AM
      Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] bacteria and mycorrhiza


      Hello Sergio, I probably didn't make myself clear, it wasn't that I'm
      unaware of how to make compost, just how compost can help in NF.

      While I'd agree that the processes of decomposition inside a compost pile
      are natural my concern is with gathering all the material, chopping it,
      adding lime, soil or manure and moistening it and then return, perhaps more
      than once, to turn it in order to keep the composting process optimal.

      Surely it is simpler to scatter any organic matter on your soil directly and
      allow the soil life, sun, air and rain to break it down where it's needed.
      Other benefits of this direct approach is that the layer will act as a mulch
      protecting the soil from extremes of temperature, water loss, weed
      germination surface compaction etc. But not only that, because it is not
      densely packed, the mulch layer will disintegrate without losing as much of
      its energy value in the thermophyllic reactions ( ie escaping as heat) found
      inside compost heaps (from Lemieux's work at Laval University) and because
      heat favours bacterial reactions, the mulch alternative favours a more
      balanced soil life.

      I'm not against composting per se, I compost all our household organic
      scraps that would simply be lost to the dustbin otherwise (although such
      scraps can as easily be thrown under the mulch layer directly on the bed a
      la Ruth Stout).

      But the history of organic farming is the history of the search for the
      perfect compost, but NF is not organic farming, but as Fukuoka admits:

      "Farmers have been working for centuries to try to increase the production
      of compost.
      The Ministry of Agriculture used to give incentive pay to encourage compost
      production, and
      competitive compost exhibitions were held as annual events. Farmers came to
      believe in
      compost as though it were the protective deity of the soil. Now again there
      is a movement to
      make more compost, "better" compost, with earthworms and "compost-starter."
      There is no
      reason to expect an easy acceptance of my suggestion that prepared compost
      is
      unnecessary, that all you have to do is scatter fresh unshredded straw
      across the field."

      Jamie
      Souscayrous






      -----Original Message-----
      From: Sergio Montinola [mailto:sjmosprey2001@...]
      Sent: Thursday, March 13, 2003 9:12 PM
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] bacteria and mycorrhiza

      DEAR JAMIE,

      COMPOS TING IS ANOTHER SYSTEM OF ALLOWING ORGANIC
      MATTER TO ROT IN TIME. THE FUKUOKA SYSTEM IS TO LEAVE
      EVERYTHING ON THE GROUND TO ROT AND DECOMPOSE. THIS
      MAY TAKE TIME ALTHOUGH YOU "DO NOTHING" BUT TO WAIT
      FOR TIME AND THE NATURAL WAY IT WILL ROT AND
      DECOMPOSE.

      COMPOSING IS SIMPLY HELPING NATURE TO DO ITS JOB
      FASTER. BY CHOPPING THE ORGANIC MATERIALS INTO SMALLER
      AND FINER PARTICLES YOU AC CELERATE THE TIME NEEDED TO
      DECOMPOSE AND ROT TO TURN IT INTO FERTILE SOIL.

      LAYERS OF CHOP MATERIAL WITH LIME, SOIL AND ANIMAL
      MANURE WILL ACCELERATE THE DECOMPOSING BECAUSE OF THE
      BENEFICIAL MICROBES FROM THE SOIL AND THE ANIMAL
      MANURE.

      THERE ARE MANY BOOKS ON COMPOSING AND WILL GIVE YOU A
      LOT OF INFORMATION ON COMPOSING WHICH IS THE BASIC
      SYSTEM OF MAKING FERTILE SOIL.

      FUKUOKA IS "A DO NOTHING" SYSTEM. IT WORKS TOO BUT
      WILL TAKE MORE TIME AND PATIENCE.

      REGARDS,
      SERGIO



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