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what is soil?

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  • jamie
    Hello Everyone, here’s a very nice quote taken from the Introduction of Krasil’nikov’s ‘Soil Microorganisms and Higher Plants’ that offers another
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 6, 2003
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      Hello Everyone, here’s a very nice quote taken from the Introduction of
      Krasil’nikov’s ‘Soil Microorganisms and Higher Plants’ that offers another
      perspective on soil;

      “The principal property of the soil fertility is determined by biological
      factors, mainly by microorganisms. The development of life in soil endows it
      with the property of fertility. "The notion of soil is inseparable from the
      notion of the development of living organisms in it". Soil is created by
      microorganisms. "Were this life dead or stopped, the former soil would
      become an object of geology" (Vi'lyams, 1950, p 204).
      Kostychev and Vil'yams transferred the science of soil from the chapter of
      geology to the chapter of biology.”

      Don’t forget that this seminal work on soil is available from Steve Solomon’
      s www.soilandhealth.org <http://www.soilandhealth.org/> library.

      Elaine Ingham’s www.soilfoodweb.com <http://www.soilfoodweb.com/> expresses
      this essential connectivity of soil, life and fertility very well. Without a
      doubt anyone who can maintain a fully integrated and diverse soil life will
      be able to achieve disease and pest free plants. For anyone who has Fukuoka’
      s Natural Way of Farming, Chapter 4 has some detailed recommendations for
      vegetable planting dependent upon weed succession and long term rotations
      for many vegetable and cereal species. This practical advice is based upon
      establishing and maintaining this soil microbial life, so that
      successionally and rotationally soil receives the plant exudates and
      residues necessary to maintain the diverse microorganism life required of
      healthy soil. Monocultures and reduced rotations encourage only certain
      microorganisms, biodiversity and long rotations allow the full spectrum of
      microorganisms to become established.

      Jamie
      Souscayrous





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