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Raoul Robinson Available on ShareBooks

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  • Robert Monie
    Hi Everybody, At http://www.sharebooks.ca/RaoulRobinson.htm you can read several e-copies of his books (there are more than two), including: Amateur Potato
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2003
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      Hi Everybody,

      At http://www.sharebooks.ca/RaoulRobinson.htm you can read several e-copies of his books (there are more than two), including:

      Amateur Potato Breeder's Manual

      Amateur Plant Breeder's Handbook

      Farming and Us

      Return to Resistance

      Self-Organizing Agro-Ecosystems

      That last title is positiuvely Fukokian; Let's go to it!

      Thanks again, Dominique, for the lead.

      Bob Monie--one foot on the Mississippi Delta, the other in cybespace







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    • Larry Haftl
      ... e-copies ... Bob, you never cease to amaze me. What a jackpot! Thanks for the link. It is definitely a keeper. Larry Haftl larry@larryhaftl.com
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2003
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        >At http://www.sharebooks.ca/RaoulRobinson.htm you can read several
        e-copies
        >of his books (there are more than two), including:

        Bob, you never cease to amaze me. What a jackpot! Thanks for the
        link. It is definitely a keeper.

        Larry Haftl
        larry@...
        http://LarryHaftl.com
        http://FukuokaFarmingOL.net
      • glObe
        Hey everyone, I have four days vacation coming up and I am thinking of making a visit to the Fukuoka farm, but I don t know where exactly it is. Couldn t find
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 1, 2003
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          Hey everyone,
          I have four days vacation coming up and I am thinking of making a visit to the Fukuoka farm, but I don't know where exactly it is. Couldn't find anything on the Net about it either. If any of you know the address of the farm, or have contact info, please let me know.
          william



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        • jamie
          Hello William, in case you haven t yet made a trawl through the group s archives you might not have come across this forwarded message (message 1019) from Kyle
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 1, 2003
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            Hello William, in case you haven't yet made a trawl through the group's
            archives you might not have come across this forwarded message (message
            1019) from Kyle about his journey to Japan and his meetings with those
            involved with Fukuoka farming. I have cut and pasted a relevant passage from
            it (and the whole post beneath that) about Fukuoka's farm now. I think the
            point is that there is nothing to see any longer and that his family would
            not appreciate a visit.

            Jamie
            Souscayrous

            August 4 Jinno-san accompanied me to Fukuoka-sanfs family farm. Fukuokafs
            farm is about 1 or 2 kilometers from the ocean. Fukuoka-sanfs son asked
            that we not enter Fukuoka-sanfs Shizen-Nouen or Tetsugaku-Doujo hut.
            Tetsugaku means gphilosophyh and Doujo means gplace for following the
            wayh. Five years ago Fukuoka-san quit farming. He now lives with either
            his son in Iyo-City or with Yajima-san or Honma-san in Tokyo. Yajima-san
            sometimes translates for Fukuoka. The Shizen-Nouen has become overgrown
            with weeds and the buildings have become dilapidated. Since I couldnft
            enter, I couldnft see how the wild vegetables are competing with the weeds.
            Jinno-san assured me that there is nothing to see. Honma-san later
            reminded me that when Fukuoka began farming, the Shizen-Nouen was barren
            clay. The orchards are farmed by Fukuokafs son. I saw the rice paddies
            that Fukuoka farmed using his direct seeding rice-barely succession. They
            are now tilled conventionally. Jinno-san drove me back to Wada-sanfs
            Natsuki-Shizen-Nouen.




            The following is a record of my visits to farms practicing organic no-till
            and my meeting with Masanobu Fukuoka-san, his student Yuuko Honma-san, and
            translator Tsunemichi Kurosawa-san. (san is placed after a personfs family
            name in Japanese. Apart from habit, I thought that it might be helpful to
            distinguish family names.)

            All of the farms tend to follow Yoshikazu Kawaguchi-sanfs method.
            Kawaguchi-sanfs first book, gBeyond Natural Farmingh, was published in
            1993. He has several books in print. Like Fukuoka-san, Kawaguchi-sanfs
            methods rest upon a philosophical/spiritual basis. In addition to farming,
            he also teaches Chinese medicine. But like Fukuoka-san, he often speaks on
            topics ranging from religion to economics. Ifm told that translators have
            looked at his books, but none feel comfortable dealing with the range of
            topics he covers. Kawaguchi-san currently leads the no-till movement in
            Japan.

            I have visited Kawaguchi-sanfs farm and have recently begun attending
            Kawaguchi-sanfs monthly Akame Shizen-Nou Juku (Akame Natural Farming
            School). Akame Shizen-Nou Juku is located on the side of a mountain between
            Nara and Mie Prefectures. School is held on the second Sunday and the
            preceding Saturday of each month. Students may borrow a small rice paddy
            and vegetable field for their own use. The overt purpose of Akame
            Shizen-Nou Juku is to teach, free of charge, Kawaguchi-sanfs method of
            organic, no-till farming to anyone who wants to learn. One of the
            underlying purposes is to enabling (city) people the skills to move back to
            the land and become food self-sufficient.

            Kawaguchi-sanfs method targets vegetable and cereal farmers. For
            vegetables, raised beds are used. The level of weed removal and soil
            invasion depends upon the intended vegetable and present weeds. Vegetables
            that have either a difficult time competing or seeds that donft readily
            germinate, i.e. carrots, require the removal of weeds, including their
            roots, using simple hand tools. Kawaguchi-san uses three tools only, a
            sickle, a hoe, and a shovel. Plants that compete well and germinate easily
            can be sown among the weeds. For example, red turnip seeds are sow among
            the weeds. After sowing, weeds are cut and left as a mulch. After planting
            seeds or seedlings, weeds that were removed are used as mulch. Afterwards,
            weeds are cut as needed, not pulled, and applied directly as mulch.
            Kawaguchi-san emphasizes the importance of weeds. Their functions are too
            numerous to list.

            Kawaguchi-san arranges vegetable fields amidst his rice paddies. The
            vegetable fields are not flooded, but benefit from the high water table.
            They also provide biodiversity, breaking stretches of rice. Vegetables that
            prefer a dryer environment, i.e. tomatoes, burdock root, etc. are not
            planted in these fields.

            Some initial observations:
            1. Kawaguchi-san utilizes layering. Spreading vegetables are grown
            alongside standing crops. For example, cucumbers are grown as a cover
            between rows of green and red peppers.
            2. Root, legume, leaf, and fruit vegetables are rotated so that the same
            type of vegetable is not cultivated one after another in the same area.
            3. The same cabbage plant is harvested three times. After a head of cabbage
            is harvested, the rootstock sends out many shoots. All of the shoots except
            one are removed, allowing the one remaining shoot to develop into another
            head.
            4. In central Japan, fall/winter vegetables are stuck between a rock and a
            hard place. If they are planted too early, they are devoured by insects.
            If they are planted too late, itfs too cold for them to mature.
            Kawaguchi-sanfs solution is to plant them early in a growth of summer weeds
            amongst the fading summer vegetables. The summer vegetables and weeds keep
            them cool and protect them from insects. For example, Daikon seeds are
            planted amongst the nearly finished watermelon.

            For rice cultivation, Kawaguchi-san transplants single seedlings at
            intervals of 40x35cm. Paddies are flooded heavily after transplanting and
            when the rice begins to head-out. During the intervening two months, the
            paddies are dry except for rain. After transplanting, the paddies are
            flooded to weaken weeds. A dry paddy controls rice growth. When the rice
            grains begin the form, the paddy is again flooded.

            Since there is no one to control the water level in rice paddies at Akame
            Shizen-Nou Juku between monthly classes, water is constantly run through the
            paddies.

            2002 Summer

            July 28 I traveled by ferry to Matsuyama-city in Ehime-Prefecture on the
            island of Shikoku.

            July 29 I traveled by train to Uchiko-Town. Wada-san met me at the station.
            I volunteered at Wada-sanfs farm, Natsuki-Shizen-Nouen. Three years
            ago, after reading Fukuokafs gOne-Straw Revolutionh, Mitsuhiro and Masami
            quit their jobs in Matsuyama and moved to Uchiko to begin farming. After
            moving to Uchiko their daughter Azuki-chan was born. Wada-san grows
            vegetables and cereals, and has five chickens. Chicken manure is mixed with
            rice hulls and applied as fertilizer.

            July 31 Wada-san drove me to Nakatani-sanfs Shizen-Nouen (farm). The
            Nakatani family moved from Osaka to Uchiko-Town, Ehime-Prefecture over 10
            years ago after reading Masanobu Fukuokafs gOne-Straw Revolutionh to
            begin farming. They didnft know anyone in Ehime, but knew that was where
            Fukuoka-san was farming. Mr. and Mrs. Nakatani have three sons. Ryusuke
            and Tempei, the two younger sons, are in their 20fs and farm
            Nakatani-sanfs Shizen-Nouen. When planting summer vegetables, they tend to
            press down winter weeds instead of cutting them. They find that pressed
            winter weeds control summer weeds better than cut winter weeds. When
            planting winter vegetables, they press down winter weeds. Sometimes they
            mulch heavily on top of pressed weeds without first pulling or cutting them.
            The Nakatanifs are integrating smaller deciduous trees into their
            vegetable fields.

            August 1 Nakatani-san drove me back to Wada-sanfs Natsuki-Shizen-Nouen.

            August 3 Wada-san drove me to Tetsuyuki Jinno-sanfs home. Jinno-san has a
            small garden and rice paddy. He also assists Fukuoka-san and Homma-san with
            the collection of seeds and the production of seedballs for distribution in
            the worldfs deserts in order to halt and reverse desertification.

            Jinno-san grows rice with the Ehime Shizen-Nou Juku (Ehime school of natural
            farming) lead by Horiuchi-san. The Ehime Shizen-Nou Juku uses the following
            method:
            Preparing Rice Seedlings
            1. Designate a small area in the rice paddy to prepare rice seedlings for
            transplant. For an average size rice paddy, 1 or 2 square meters will do.
            2. Two to three months before sowing rice, scatter organic fertilizer over
            the area. The Ehime Shizen-Nou Jukufs fertilizer consists of two
            ingredients: 1. The bran that is removed from brown rice when it is
            polished. 2. Cooking oil production waste.
            3. Weed the area.
            4. Remove a thin layer of soil.
            5. Dig a thin channel around the area.
            6. Place 25cm-high siding in the thin channel around the area. Plastic is
            now commonly used in Japan, though wood was probably traditionally used.
            The purpose of the siding is to protect the seedlings and hold rainwater.
            7. Sow rice seeds. For an average size rice paddy, a large handful of rice
            seeds will do.
            8. Lightly cover seeds with soil previously removed.
            9. Scatter a heavy cover of cut straw over the rice seedlings.
            10. Cover with a net to protect seedlings from birds.
            11. Check seeds periodically. When the seeds sprout, remove some of the
            straw cover.
            Transplanting.
            12. When the rice seedlings are 15 to 20cm tall, transplant into a dry
            paddy. The Ehime Shizen-Nou Juku presses a hole in soil. Individual
            seedlings are transplanted as opposed to conventional rice cultivation that
            transplants plugs of up to four seedlings at a time.
            Weeding
            13. After transplanting the paddy is flooded to weaken weeds.
            14. Humans weed the paddy once between planting and harvest. By controlling
            water, Horiuchi-san has learned how to direct Jumbo Tanishi to feed upon the
            weeds. Jumbo Tanishi are snails maybe 3cm in diameter.
            15. When the rice begins to head out, the paddy is continuously flooded.
            Harvesting
            16. Rice is harvested by hand and hung.
            17. All straw is cut and returned to the paddy.

            August 4 Jinno-san accompanied me to Fukuoka-sanfs family farm. Fukuokafs
            farm is about 1 or 2 kilometers from the ocean. Fukuoka-sanfs son asked
            that we not enter Fukuoka-sanfs Shizen-Nouen or Tetsugaku-Doujo hut.
            Tetsugaku means gphilosophyh and Doujo means gplace for following the
            wayh. Five years ago Fukuoka-san quit farming. He now lives with either
            his son in Iyo-City or with Yajima-san or Honma-san in Tokyo. Yajima-san
            sometimes translates for Fukuoka. The Shizen-Nouen has become overgrown
            with weeds and the buildings have become dilapidated. Since I couldnft
            enter, I couldnft see how the wild vegetables are competing with the weeds.
            Jinno-san assured me that there is nothing to see. Honma-san later
            reminded me that when Fukuoka began farming, the Shizen-Nouen was barren
            clay. The orchards are farmed by Fukuokafs son. I saw the rice paddies
            that Fukuoka farmed using his direct seeding rice-barely succession. They
            are now tilled conventionally. Jinno-san drove me back to Wada-sanfs
            Natsuki-Shizen-Nouen.

            August 6 I traveled to Kappa Doujo, a Soto Zen temple near Takamatsu-City in
            Kagawa-Prefecture.

            August 7 I returned home to Hashimoto-City in Wakayama-Prefecture.

            August 11 I traveled to Fuji Eco Park Village near mount Fuji. Fuji Eco
            Park is a sustainable living demonstration site. An English map of Fuji Eco
            Park is posted at www.fujieco.co.jp.

            August 13 I traveled to the Permaculture Center Japan. The Permaculture
            Center Japan holds classes and maintains several small gardens and rice
            paddies.

            August 15 I attended the Kuniumi Festival/Macrobiotic Gathering in
            Kanagawa-prefecture. Fukuoka-san lectured and I spoke with his student
            Homma-san. I had several questions about Fukuoka-sanfs direct seeding
            rice-barely succession. Hashimoto-san and I intend to try Fukuoka-sanfs
            method this fall. After the festival I returned to the Permaculture Center
            Japan.

            August 18 I traveled with Fukuoka-san, Homma-san, and Kurosawa-san to the
            Green Form in Tochigi-Prefecture. Kurosawa-san helped translate
            Fukuoka-sanfs gOne-Straw Revolutionh. At the Green Form, Homma-san
            conducted a small seedball workshop while Fukuoka-san spoke to eager ears.
            The Green Form was held in what must be one of Japanfs largest
            environmental disasters. I was told that one hundred years ago, a copper
            refinery and mine released poisonous gas destroying the forests and
            poisoning the river. The mountains are still barren as far as the eye can
            see. I met Kanji Mizutani-san who works for a forestry and forest products
            research institute. His is using seedballs to reforest the mountains.

            During the train ride I asked Fukuoka-san how his methods might be applied
            to the USAfs upper-Midwest. Fukuoka-san responded with a 20-minute lecture
            on Christian and Buddhist ethics. I explained the difficulties of acquiring
            Fukuoka-sanfs books in the USA. I asked if it might be possible to share
            his works via the internet. The word used was kirai, meaning ghateh.
            Apparently Fukuoka-san hates the internet. Neither he nor Homma-san use the
            internet. Since all of the handouts Ifve received from them are copies of
            hand written documents, I suspect that they do not use a word processor
            either. Yajima-san reports that Fukuoka-san does not mind his books being
            printed in India. I mentioned that I visited his family farm while he was
            in Tokyo. He explained that natural farming is no longer being practiced.
            His family believes that by using machines higher yields can be obtained.
            He didnft say if the family farm is still organic. Yajima-san reports that
            the orchards are still maintained organically. Fukuoka-san asked me if
            Americans support president Bush and what I think of the US president. He
            also asked me what I thought was true happiness. Is the accumulation of
            material goods genuine happiness, he asked? He also asked what I thought
            about the US space program and if it has any meaning.

            If I remember correctly, Fukuoka-san and Homma-san will be traveling to
            India on September 10. They wanted to go to Pakistan but are not able to.

            August 19 I traveled to Satou-sanfs Yamanami Noujou (farm) in
            Kawamata-Town, Fukushima-Prefecture. There are several organic no-till
            farms near Kawamata. Kiyokazu Shidara-san of the Permaculture Center Japan
            considers Yamanami Noujou to be the most successful permaculture design and
            no-till farm in Japan. Alternative designs include: A grapevine greenhouse
            built on the south side of the home; a gray-water goldfish pond; methane
            from the composting toilet is captured and used to fuel the kitchenfs gas
            range; wood is used as fuel for cooking, heating, and heating bath water;
            bath water is used to wash clothes by hand; a water system is run around the
            central wood burning stove to supply the kitchen hot water in winter; as in
            traditional Japanese homes, a charcoal pit is located in the center of the
            living room.

            Kazuo Satou-san farmed conventionally using chemicals for over ten years,
            changed to organic farming for over ten years, and now has been practicing
            no-till for over ten years. The Satou family sells their produce in
            conjunction with three of their previous students.

            While at Yamanami Noujou I read the book gLessons from Natureh by Simpei
            Murakami-san. The book was originally written in English. Although it
            practically describes Murakami-sanfs experience of farming in tropical
            Bangladesh, its gFukuokaianh philosophy is universal. Murakami-san lives
            in a small community near Yamanami Noujou. Satou-san and I visited the
            community, but Murakami was in Mie-Prefecture at the time.

            Takahiro Todoroki-san of Kawamata, grows rice without tilling or machines.
            Hefs finding that spacing two seeds at intervals identical to those he
            transplants produces almost identical results, eliminating the need to
            transplant.

            On August 23 I traveled to Jake Reinerfs Earth Embassy near Mt. Fuji.
            Please see www.earthembassy.org for more information.

            On August 25 I returned home to Hashimoto-City.

            I overheard, but understood little of, a
            conversation between Kurosawa-san, Homma-san, and Fukuoka-san. Kurosawa-san
            and Homma-san both expressed their concern regarding the difficulty of
            acquiring Fukuoka's books in America. I didn't understand his short reply,
            but it wasn't one of great concern. As I mentioned before, according to
            Yajima-san, Fukuoka is content with the English versions of his books being
            printed in India.

            As far as I know, the following books of Fukuoka have been published in
            Japanese, three or four of which are translated. I haven't been able to
            locate Alfred Firnbaum or his translation, though I hear that it exists.

            1. Shizen Nou Hou: Wara Ippon no Kakume = The One-Straw Revolution
            2. MU I: Kami no Kakume - Alfred Firnbaum translated the title as The God
            Revolution.
            3. MU II: Mu no Tetsugaku = A philosophy of Nothingness
            4. MU III: Shizen Nou Hou = The way of natural farming: The theory and
            practice of green philosophy
            5. Shizen ni kaeru = The Road back to nature: Regaining a paradise lost
            6. Shizen ni ikiru - Living naturally / natural living
            This is a record of multiple interviews with Fukuoka
            7. I forgot the exact Japanese title. It translates something like, The
            people, nature, god revolution. Like the later "Traveling with seedballs",
            its full of pictures.
            8. Nendo dango no tabi = Traveling with seedballs. Mainly photographs.

            I bought the video gFor Living on the Planet Earthh from Honma-san. I
            expect that she will be selling copies at Fukuoka's classes in India. It is
            primarily a record of Fukuokafs October 1997 visit to India to attend an
            international seminar to commemorate Mahatma Gandhi. During his 19-day
            stay, he lectured and observed many farms and gardens. Honma-san lead a
            seedball workshop. The English version is 61 minutes and was dubbed in
            1998. The director is Kouji IMAIZUMI-san. The producer is Salbong (NPO).
            The address of Salbong is

            Salbong Kouji IMAIZUMI-san
            4-8-5 Motoasakusa Taitoku Tokyo 111-0041
            JAPAN

            If you are interested in a copy of the video, I suggest writing to the
            address above. The video is 3800 yen and airmail postage is 670 yen. This
            doesnft include packaging.

            Information in Englsih regarding Yoshizaku Kawaguchi's books can be found on
            the internet. Search Google with the key words Yoshizaku Kawaguchi natural
            farming.

            I hope this helps,
            Kyle

            -----Original Message-----
            From: glObe [mailto:methodologyx@...]
            Sent: dimanche 2 février 2003 05:17
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Fukuoka Farm


            Hey everyone,
            I have four days vacation coming up and I am thinking of making a visit to
            the Fukuoka farm, but I don't know where exactly it is. Couldn't find
            anything on the Net about it either. If any of you know the address of the
            farm, or have contact info, please let me know.
            william



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