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Re: [fukuoka_farming] slopes and books

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  • Wldwstent@aol.com
    I for one will not BUY hay that has headed out. The protein content drops from 12-14% in grass hay that has not headed to a mere eight per cent TOPS for hay
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 3, 2003
      I for one will not BUY hay that has headed out. The protein content drops
      from 12-14% in grass hay that has not headed to a mere eight per cent TOPS
      for hay that has BEGUN to bloom. Once grass has bloomed it is STRAW. THAT IS
      THE DEFINITION OF STRAW my dear. The heads shatter, the seeds scatter. Not
      only is the protein content of the "hay" lost but most of the grain involved
      is also lost in the cutting and curing of said "hay."


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tiakd14477 <sentree@hotmail.com>
      Just a confusion in definition of terms. I live in a prairie province where everybody grows grain and hay, and this is how they refer to their crops. Around
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 3, 2003
        Just a confusion in definition of terms. I live in a prairie
        province where everybody grows grain and hay, and this is how they
        refer to their crops.
        Around here (the grain province of Canada), nothing is straw until
        the seeds have fallen off. When grain plants "head out", they are
        FORMING heads, not shattering seeds. If they were to cut all the
        straw here when it was "heading out", they would lose all their
        grain crops because the grain hasn't properly matured when it is
        heading out. IF they cut it when it is heading out, it is called
        green feed, because the heads are still in the dough/soft stage, and
        stay on the stalks. When the heads are "ripe" they are ready to be
        combined for grain.
        Once grass has "headed out", it does not shatter. Nobody cuts their
        grass for seed after it has headed out, or they will get no seeds.
        It is not considered straw unless the heads mature, then bloom and
        pollinate, then go to seed, and THEN shatter (which from heading to
        shattering can be a period of 2-4 weeks around here). Here, they
        usually cut timothy just as it is heading (or just as the heads are
        forming), but before blooming. If they cut alfalfa "before it
        heads", they means they have cut it before any heads ie. before it
        has heads to bloom.
        You obviously mean something different than I meant. Around
        here "heading out" and "has bloomed" do not mean the same thing.
        IT doesn't mean the farmers here are cutting hay at the correct
        time, as they are cutting for maximum yields, not health of the
        field or top protien content.
        Emilia said to cut it before the heads even formed, not before
        blooming, which is after heads have formed and are now opening. If
        the alfalfa headed out here, you would have a 2-4 week period before
        it bloomed and then went to seed ie. became straw.

        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Wldwstent@a... wrote:
        > I for one will not BUY hay that has headed out. The protein
        content drops
        > from 12-14% in grass hay that has not headed to a mere eight per
        cent TOPS
        > for hay that has BEGUN to bloom. Once grass has bloomed it is
        STRAW. THAT IS
        > THE DEFINITION OF STRAW my dear. The heads shatter, the seeds
        scatter. Not
        > only is the protein content of the "hay" lost but most of the
        grain involved
        > is also lost in the cutting and curing of said "hay."
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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