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Re Bunch articles

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  • Larry Haftl
    Hello again ... wrote in 1997 for the Vietnamese-German Technical Cooperation Social Forestry Development Project that, although technical, is entirely
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 23, 2002
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      Hello again

      > Then, there is a very long consultancy paper that Roland Bunch
      wrote in 1997 for the Vietnamese-German Technical Cooperation Social
      Forestry Development Project that, although technical, is entirely
      readable, even entertaining, to anyone with a serious interest in
      the subject.

      Does this sound like the paper you are talking about?
      REPORT ON SOIL CONSERVATION,
      SOIL IMPROVEMENT AND EXTENSION FOR THE
      SONG DA WATERSHED AND CARE PROJECTS
      Consultancy Report Nr. 9
      By: Roland Bunch
      March 1997

      If so, I've got the link (WAY too long to post here) and can add
      it to the collection.


      > "Scientific research has now confirmed that food crops can extract
      nutrients from a liter layer and that they REDESIGN THEIR ENTIRE
      ROOT SYSTEM in order to do so more efficiently" [My capitalization.
      ]
      >
      > Here is an explosion of possibilities. Do generations of plants
      grown as mulch feeders genetically change into mulch-preferring varieties?
      Can (should) plant varieities preferring mulch be deliberately bred?
      This goes back to a question I asked when I first joined this list.
      Can there be such a thing as "Fukuoka" or "natural farming" seeds
      (or nursery plants varieties, for that matter)? Will such seeds (plants)
      invariably work better in natural culture than seeds (plants) grown
      some other way?
      > Any of you plant breeders like to comment on this?

      No way am I a "plant breeder", can't even claim to be very successful
      as a "plant grower" unless you count weeds, but I'll offer two bits.
      .

      Seems that plants, if they survive, can naturalize to a microclimate
      using whatever adaptive mechanism works for them. The same plant
      taken to a different growing environment will either fail to survive
      or adapt using perhaps a different mechanism. In both cases they
      may or may not achieve "optimal" growth. So it would seem to me that
      "Fukuoka" seeds are those adapted to growing without the need for,
      or in spite of, the use of "unnatural" fertilizers and other chemicals.
      "Unnatural" being something not indiginous to the microclimate,
      or if indiginous not made available in quantities that exceed "natural"
      delivery.

      The other bit was a statement by Alan Smith about 25% of a plant's
      energy collection being transferred to the rhizosphere (finally figured
      out exactly what that word means) in order to supply the microbial
      life with the energy it needs to do the work the plant needs to get
      accessible nutrients. I used to think good sci-fi was mind expanding.
      Now it's pedestrian compared to what is actually going on under
      my feet.

      Larry Haftl
      larry@...
      http://LarryHaftl.com
      http://FukuokaFarmingOL.net
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