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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball

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  • Nandan Palaparambil
    Dear Rajuji, Probably you are getting good germination, since the fertility of your farm is better? My land s fertility is not that good. Right now my main
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 8, 2013
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      Dear Rajuji,

      Probably you are getting good germination, since the fertility of your farm is better? My land's fertility is not that good.

      Right now my main problem with any cultivation is non-uniform germination. If directly put the sesame seeds without seedball, fear ants will take most of them.

      Usually after putting the seedballs, I cut and mulch the grass. But now I have a feeling, mulching with green grass may generate heat and affect the germination. Fukuoka san used to mulch always with dried straw.

      Regards,
      Nandan

      --- On Wed, 1/9/13, Raju Titus <rajuktitus@...> wrote:

      From: Raju Titus <rajuktitus@...>
      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2013, 9:18 AM








       









      Dear Nandanji,

      We sow small seeds in N.F. by direct seeding. Generally we sow Sesame

      in summer after winter wheat crop with Mung.

      Thanks

      Raju



      On 1/7/13, Nandan p_k_nandanan@...> wrote:

      > Hi All,

      >

      > I am planning to try Sesame in this season without tilling the land. The

      > usual cultivation practice is to lighlty till the land after the rice

      > cultivation and powderise the soil (not making the muddy style). The sesame

      > seeds are broadcasted and again tilled once.

      >

      > I wanted to make seed balls using sesame seeds, which is quite small.

      > Rolling one seedball at a time is time consuming and it may have multiple

      > seeds in it.

      >

      > Any one has tried seed ball with sesame or similar small seeds?

      >

      >

      > Regards,

      > Nandan

      >

      >



      --

      *Raju Titus.Natural farm.Hoshangabad. M.P. 461001.*

      rajuktitus@.... +919179738049.

      http://picasaweb.google.com/rajuktitus

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/fukuoka_farming/

      http://rishikheti.blogspot.com/




















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Nandan Palaparambil
      I tried the method given in the following link given by Milan Broz for clover seeds and it is working out. It took just 20 minutes to make these seed balls
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 9, 2013
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        I tried the method given in the following link given by 'Milan Broz' for clover seeds and it is working out. It took just 20 minutes to make these seed balls and hope it will be effective in the field.

        http://www.permies.com/t/17855/fukuoka/Seed-ball-failure

        Thanks to Paul Wheaton for maintaining this discussion forum.


        Here are some photos updated in my blog..
        http://farming-experiments.blogspot.in/2012/10/making-seedballs.html


        Regards,
        Nandan


        --- On Wed, 1/9/13, Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...> wrote:

        From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
        Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2013, 9:48 AM








         









        Dear Rajuji,



        Probably you are getting good germination, since the fertility of your farm is better? My land's fertility is not that good.



        Right now my main problem with any cultivation is non-uniform germination. If directly put the sesame seeds without seedball, fear ants will take most of them.



        Usually after putting the seedballs, I cut and mulch the grass. But now I have a feeling, mulching with green grass may generate heat and affect the germination. Fukuoka san used to mulch always with dried straw.



        Regards,

        Nandan



        --- On Wed, 1/9/13, Raju Titus rajuktitus@...> wrote:



        From: Raju Titus rajuktitus@...>

        Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball

        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com

        Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2013, 9:18 AM



         



        Dear Nandanji,



        We sow small seeds in N.F. by direct seeding. Generally we sow Sesame



        in summer after winter wheat crop with Mung.



        Thanks



        Raju



        On 1/7/13, Nandan p_k_nandanan@...> wrote:



        > Hi All,



        >



        > I am planning to try Sesame in this season without tilling the land. The



        > usual cultivation practice is to lighlty till the land after the rice



        > cultivation and powderise the soil (not making the muddy style). The sesame



        > seeds are broadcasted and again tilled once.



        >



        > I wanted to make seed balls using sesame seeds, which is quite small.



        > Rolling one seedball at a time is time consuming and it may have multiple



        > seeds in it.



        >



        > Any one has tried seed ball with sesame or similar small seeds?



        >



        >



        > Regards,



        > Nandan



        >



        >



        --



        *Raju Titus.Natural farm.Hoshangabad. M.P. 461001.*



        rajuktitus@.... +919179738049.



        http://picasaweb.google.com/rajuktitus



        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/fukuoka_farming/



        http://rishikheti.blogspot.com/



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Raju Titus
        Dear Nandanji, Damage by insects is possible in direct seeding.Fertility is not problem Sesame is leguminous which grows well in poor soil. Your soil is not
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 9, 2013
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          Dear Nandanji,
          Damage by insects is possible in direct seeding.Fertility is not
          problem Sesame is leguminous which grows well in poor soil. Your soil
          is not poor due to zero tillage.
          Sesame require warm condition will germinate easily in pallets in the
          green mulch of grass. It is better to have experiment in small peace
          of land. Leguminous crop rotation with Rice is better for Nitrogen
          fixing. Sesame supply Nitrogen and Rice consume Nitrogen. This is the
          basic of N.F. Fukuoka was getting better yield of Rice and Wheat due
          to White clover as ground cover. You can + Pigeon pea and Mung with
          Sesame after Rice crop.
          Thanks
          Raju

          On 1/9/13, Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...> wrote:
          > I tried the method given in the following link given by 'Milan Broz' for
          > clover seeds and it is working out. It took just 20 minutes to make these
          > seed balls and hope it will be effective in the field.
          >
          > http://www.permies.com/t/17855/fukuoka/Seed-ball-failure
          >
          > Thanks to Paul Wheaton for maintaining this discussion forum.
          >
          >
          > Here are some photos updated in my blog..
          > http://farming-experiments.blogspot.in/2012/10/making-seedballs.html
          >
          >
          > Regards,
          > Nandan
          >
          >
          > --- On Wed, 1/9/13, Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
          > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball
          > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2013, 9:48 AM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Dear Rajuji,
          >
          >
          >
          > Probably you are getting good germination, since the fertility of your farm
          > is better? My land's fertility is not that good.
          >
          >
          >
          > Right now my main problem with any cultivation is non-uniform germination.
          > If directly put the sesame seeds without seedball, fear ants will take most
          > of them.
          >
          >
          >
          > Usually after putting the seedballs, I cut and mulch the grass. But now I
          > have a feeling, mulching with green grass may generate heat and affect the
          > germination. Fukuoka san used to mulch always with dried straw.
          >
          >
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > Nandan
          >
          >
          >
          > --- On Wed, 1/9/13, Raju Titus rajuktitus@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > From: Raju Titus rajuktitus@...>
          >
          > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball
          >
          > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2013, 9:18 AM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Dear Nandanji,
          >
          >
          >
          > We sow small seeds in N.F. by direct seeding. Generally we sow Sesame
          >
          >
          >
          > in summer after winter wheat crop with Mung.
          >
          >
          >
          > Thanks
          >
          >
          >
          > Raju
          >
          >
          >
          > On 1/7/13, Nandan p_k_nandanan@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >> Hi All,
          >
          >
          >
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >> I am planning to try Sesame in this season without tilling the land. The
          >
          >
          >
          >> usual cultivation practice is to lighlty till the land after the rice
          >
          >
          >
          >> cultivation and powderise the soil (not making the muddy style). The
          >> sesame
          >
          >
          >
          >> seeds are broadcasted and again tilled once.
          >
          >
          >
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >> I wanted to make seed balls using sesame seeds, which is quite small.
          >
          >
          >
          >> Rolling one seedball at a time is time consuming and it may have multiple
          >
          >
          >
          >> seeds in it.
          >
          >
          >
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >> Any one has tried seed ball with sesame or similar small seeds?
          >
          >
          >
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >> Regards,
          >
          >
          >
          >> Nandan
          >
          >
          >
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          >
          >
          >
          > *Raju Titus.Natural farm.Hoshangabad. M.P. 461001.*
          >
          >
          >
          > rajuktitus@.... +919179738049.
          >
          >
          >
          > http://picasaweb.google.com/rajuktitus
          >
          >
          >
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/fukuoka_farming/
          >
          >
          >
          > http://rishikheti.blogspot.com/
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >


          --
          *Raju Titus.Natural farm.Hoshangabad. M.P. 461001.*
          rajuktitus@.... +919179738049.
          http://picasaweb.google.com/rajuktitus
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/fukuoka_farming/
          http://rishikheti.blogspot.com/
        • tugrul_kinikoglu
          We have been experimenting with seedballs in the past few years with very limited success. There may have been application mistakes on our part but I think a
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 12, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            We have been experimenting with seedballs in the past few years with very limited success. There may have been application mistakes on our part but I think a book I am currently reading provides some explanation as to why seedballs were not successful in our environment.

            In Dave Jacke's Edible Forest Gardens book, "Basic Plant Strategies: Ruderals, Competitors, and Stress Tolerators" section in chapter 4, page 126 explains that plants use 3 basic niche strategies (model developed by British ecologist J.P. Grime).

            Ruderal species depend upon disturbance for habitat and cannot tolerate competition. The majority of our food plants and common weeds use this early-succession strategy.

            It seems that in the early few years, focus should be on establishing a legume ground cover which would eliminate/reduce the competition without plowing. And as Fukuoka himself did, even the ground cover should be suppressed for a period of time while the crop is beginning its life.

            Otherwise, scattering the seedballs into a field that is already being dominated by other species will surely lead to failure. This type of setting would be close to our earlier experiments.

            The challenge is to first establish a ground cover in an already dominated field. It would be interesting to see if anybody had more success with seed balls that have only seeds of legume ground cover.

            Regards,
            Tugrul

            --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Nandan" wrote:
            >
            > Hi All,
            >
            > I am planning to try Sesame in this season without tilling the land. The usual cultivation practice is to lighlty till the land after the rice cultivation and powderise the soil (not making the muddy style). The sesame seeds are broadcasted and again tilled once.
            >
            > I wanted to make seed balls using sesame seeds, which is quite small. Rolling one seedball at a time is time consuming and it may have multiple seeds in it.
            >
            > Any one has tried seed ball with sesame or similar small seeds?
            >
            >
            > Regards,
            > Nandan
            >
          • Nandan Palaparambil
            Dear Tugrul, Thanks for sharing the thoughts. In my case, I haven t found a cover crop which can co-exist with grains (rice earlier and now sesame) and also
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 14, 2013
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              Dear Tugrul,

              Thanks for sharing the thoughts.

              In my case, I haven't found a cover crop which can co-exist with grains (rice earlier and now sesame) and also water control used by Fukuoka san to weaken the legume can not be done here. Hence the best choice is to use some tall variety of grain which can compete with grass. In this climate the grass competition is less in this season, but in monsoon starting (May-June) there is strong competition.

              Right now with the tall grain variety the weed suppression is relatively OK, but the germination of grains is not uniform, this is some thing what I wanted to solve.



              Regards,
              Nandan

              --- On Sun, 1/13/13, tugrul_kinikoglu <tugrul_kinikoglu@...> wrote:

              From: tugrul_kinikoglu <tugrul_kinikoglu@...>
              Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball
              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sunday, January 13, 2013, 12:39 AM








               









              We have been experimenting with seedballs in the past few years with very limited success. There may have been application mistakes on our part but I think a book I am currently reading provides some explanation as to why seedballs were not successful in our environment.



              In Dave Jacke's Edible Forest Gardens book, "Basic Plant Strategies: Ruderals, Competitors, and Stress Tolerators" section in chapter 4, page 126 explains that plants use 3 basic niche strategies (model developed by British ecologist J.P. Grime).



              Ruderal species depend upon disturbance for habitat and cannot tolerate competition. The majority of our food plants and common weeds use this early-succession strategy.



              It seems that in the early few years, focus should be on establishing a legume ground cover which would eliminate/reduce the competition without plowing. And as Fukuoka himself did, even the ground cover should be suppressed for a period of time while the crop is beginning its life.



              Otherwise, scattering the seedballs into a field that is already being dominated by other species will surely lead to failure. This type of setting would be close to our earlier experiments.



              The challenge is to first establish a ground cover in an already dominated field. It would be interesting to see if anybody had more success with seed balls that have only seeds of legume ground cover.



              Regards,

              Tugrul



              --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Nandan" wrote:

              >

              > Hi All,

              >

              > I am planning to try Sesame in this season without tilling the land. The usual cultivation practice is to lighlty till the land after the rice cultivation and powderise the soil (not making the muddy style). The sesame seeds are broadcasted and again tilled once.

              >

              > I wanted to make seed balls using sesame seeds, which is quite small. Rolling one seedball at a time is time consuming and it may have multiple seeds in it.

              >

              > Any one has tried seed ball with sesame or similar small seeds?

              >

              >

              > Regards,

              > Nandan

              >






















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Anant Joglekar
              To resolve germination problem one can try options like Soaking seeds in warm water / using sprouted seed for sowing.   anant joglekar 9423089706 The ultimate
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 14, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                To resolve germination problem one can try options like Soaking seeds in warm water / using sprouted seed for sowing.

                 
                anant joglekar
                9423089706

                The ultimate goal of natural farming is not simply growing crops but the cultivation and perfection of human beings.  Masanobu Fukuoka



                >________________________________
                > From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
                >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                >Sent: Monday, 14 January 2013 9:48 PM
                >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball
                >
                >

                >Dear Tugrul,
                >
                >Thanks for sharing the thoughts.
                >
                >In my case, I haven't found a cover crop which can co-exist with grains (rice earlier and now sesame) and also water control used by Fukuoka san to weaken the legume can not be done here. Hence the best choice is to use some tall variety of grain which can compete with grass. In this climate the grass competition is less in this season, but in monsoon starting (May-June) there is strong competition.
                >
                >Right now with the tall grain variety the weed suppression is relatively OK, but the germination of grains is not uniform, this is some thing what I wanted to solve.
                >
                >Regards,
                >Nandan
                >
                >--- On Sun, 1/13/13, tugrul_kinikoglu tugrul_kinikoglu@...> wrote:
                >
                >From: tugrul_kinikoglu tugrul_kinikoglu@...>
                >Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball
                >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                >Date: Sunday, January 13, 2013, 12:39 AM
                >

                >
                >We have been experimenting with seedballs in the past few years with very limited success. There may have been application mistakes on our part but I think a book I am currently reading provides some explanation as to why seedballs were not successful in our environment.
                >
                >In Dave Jacke's Edible Forest Gardens book, "Basic Plant Strategies: Ruderals, Competitors, and Stress Tolerators" section in chapter 4, page 126 explains that plants use 3 basic niche strategies (model developed by British ecologist J.P. Grime).
                >
                >Ruderal species depend upon disturbance for habitat and cannot tolerate competition. The majority of our food plants and common weeds use this early-succession strategy.
                >
                >It seems that in the early few years, focus should be on establishing a legume ground cover which would eliminate/reduce the competition without plowing. And as Fukuoka himself did, even the ground cover should be suppressed for a period of time while the crop is beginning its life.
                >
                >Otherwise, scattering the seedballs into a field that is already being dominated by other species will surely lead to failure. This type of setting would be close to our earlier experiments.
                >
                >The challenge is to first establish a ground cover in an already dominated field. It would be interesting to see if anybody had more success with seed balls that have only seeds of legume ground cover.
                >
                >Regards,
                >
                >Tugrul
                >
                >--- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Nandan" wrote:
                >
                >>
                >
                >> Hi All,
                >
                >>
                >
                >> I am planning to try Sesame in this season without tilling the land. The usual cultivation practice is to lighlty till the land after the rice cultivation and powderise the soil (not making the muddy style). The sesame seeds are broadcasted and again tilled once.
                >
                >>
                >
                >> I wanted to make seed balls using sesame seeds, which is quite small. Rolling one seedball at a time is time consuming and it may have multiple seeds in it.
                >
                >>
                >
                >> Any one has tried seed ball with sesame or similar small seeds?
                >
                >>
                >
                >>
                >
                >> Regards,
                >
                >> Nandan
                >
                >>
                >
                >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Nandan Palaparambil
                Anant, This is not an option right now for me, since there is unpredictability of water availability, that is another reason why I like seed balls. Seed balls
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 14, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Anant,

                  This is not an option right now for me, since there is unpredictability of water availability, that is another reason why I like seed balls. Seed balls just wait for the sufficient moisture and then germinate. For sesame I was told, no watering is required later.


                  Regards,
                  Nandan

                  --- On Tue, 1/15/13, Anant Joglekar <apjoglekar@...> wrote:

                  From: Anant Joglekar <apjoglekar@...>
                  Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball
                  To: "fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com" <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
                  Date: Tuesday, January 15, 2013, 5:28 AM








                   









                  To resolve germination problem one can try options like Soaking seeds in warm water / using sprouted seed for sowing.



                   

                  anant joglekar

                  9423089706



                  The ultimate goal of natural farming is not simply growing crops but the cultivation and perfection of human beings.  Masanobu Fukuoka



                  >________________________________

                  > From: Nandan Palaparambil p_k_nandanan@...>

                  >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com

                  >Sent: Monday, 14 January 2013 9:48 PM

                  >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball

                  >

                  >



                  >Dear Tugrul,

                  >

                  >Thanks for sharing the thoughts.

                  >

                  >In my case, I haven't found a cover crop which can co-exist with grains (rice earlier and now sesame) and also water control used by Fukuoka san to weaken the legume can not be done here. Hence the best choice is to use some tall variety of grain which can compete with grass. In this climate the grass competition is less in this season, but in monsoon starting (May-June) there is strong competition.

                  >

                  >Right now with the tall grain variety the weed suppression is relatively OK, but the germination of grains is not uniform, this is some thing what I wanted to solve.

                  >

                  >Regards,

                  >Nandan

                  >

                  >--- On Sun, 1/13/13, tugrul_kinikoglu tugrul_kinikoglu@...> wrote:

                  >

                  >From: tugrul_kinikoglu tugrul_kinikoglu@...>

                  >Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Sesame (small seeds) in seed ball

                  >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com

                  >Date: Sunday, January 13, 2013, 12:39 AM

                  >



                  >

                  >We have been experimenting with seedballs in the past few years with very limited success. There may have been application mistakes on our part but I think a book I am currently reading provides some explanation as to why seedballs were not successful in our environment.

                  >

                  >In Dave Jacke's Edible Forest Gardens book, "Basic Plant Strategies: Ruderals, Competitors, and Stress Tolerators" section in chapter 4, page 126 explains that plants use 3 basic niche strategies (model developed by British ecologist J.P. Grime).

                  >

                  >Ruderal species depend upon disturbance for habitat and cannot tolerate competition. The majority of our food plants and common weeds use this early-succession strategy.

                  >

                  >It seems that in the early few years, focus should be on establishing a legume ground cover which would eliminate/reduce the competition without plowing. And as Fukuoka himself did, even the ground cover should be suppressed for a period of time while the crop is beginning its life.

                  >

                  >Otherwise, scattering the seedballs into a field that is already being dominated by other species will surely lead to failure. This type of setting would be close to our earlier experiments.

                  >

                  >The challenge is to first establish a ground cover in an already dominated field. It would be interesting to see if anybody had more success with seed balls that have only seeds of legume ground cover.

                  >

                  >Regards,

                  >

                  >Tugrul

                  >

                  >--- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Nandan" wrote:

                  >

                  >>

                  >

                  >> Hi All,

                  >

                  >>

                  >

                  >> I am planning to try Sesame in this season without tilling the land. The usual cultivation practice is to lighlty till the land after the rice cultivation and powderise the soil (not making the muddy style). The sesame seeds are broadcasted and again tilled once.

                  >

                  >>

                  >

                  >> I wanted to make seed balls using sesame seeds, which is quite small. Rolling one seedball at a time is time consuming and it may have multiple seeds in it.

                  >

                  >>

                  >

                  >> Any one has tried seed ball with sesame or similar small seeds?

                  >

                  >>

                  >

                  >>

                  >

                  >> Regards,

                  >

                  >> Nandan

                  >

                  >>

                  >

                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  >

                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






















                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • yajnesh shetty
                  Just wanted to share this article   http://www.deccanherald.com/content/305418/indian-farmers-better-scientists-nobel.html
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 16, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Just wanted to share this article
                     

                    http://www.deccanherald.com/content/305418/indian-farmers-better-scientists-nobel.html
                                        
                                                                                                                Regards,
                                                                                                                   Yaj.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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