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Re: [fukuoka_farming] gardening

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  • Larry Haftl
    Hi Heather, ... climate, ... than one ... My first attempt with seedballs ended with a super-abundant and very diverse bunch of weeds -- which were there
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 26, 2002
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      Hi Heather,

      >As far as I understand, he threw the mixed seed balls(very simplified
      >version*G*), and what grew well was meant to and was adapted to
      climate,
      >temperatures etc.
      >I wondered how those of you who follow this practice, grow more
      than one
      >variety of anything?

      My first attempt with seedballs ended with a super-abundant and very
      diverse bunch of weeds -- which were there before the seedballs experiment.
      I think it was a matter of timing.

      Fukuoka talks of two different types of vegetable gardening. The
      semi-wild type uses the seedballs, but also uses transplants.


      > I thought he often lets things go to seed and come up on
      >their own, but that can only be done with a few things that don't
      cross
      >pollinate.

      He likes cross-pollenation and the random hybrids that develope from it.

      >Also, how do you guys deal with things that need different Ph's?
      Treat them
      >as though they all require a moderate ph? Do you allow the soil
      to change
      >itself with mulching etc?

      What's Ph? Only kidding. Theory is to sow a wide diversity and let
      nature sort it all out. He notes that the soil chemistry constantly
      changes and that plants, especially trees, seem to adapt to it OK
      if you are not adding chemicals and such.

      >Does he deal with fruit trees that have been pruned a lot - my Mom
      prunes
      >yearly (and drastically!), so no branches are rubbing each other. The
      >cherries and apples had never been touched before we moved here,
      and looked
      >nothing like what "natural" trees are "supposed" to look like. They
      were a
      >tangled mess of branches. I believe he does minimal pruning and
      follows

      He deals with this in great detail. Look at the end of the Overview
      section of the website and you will see some of what he says about
      this, including his natural form diagrams.


      Larry Haftl
      larry@...
      http://FukuokaNaturalFarming.org
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