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Re: [fukuoka_farming] "The first farmers" -- in accord with nature's ways, not unsustainable nor industrial ways.

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  • Sumant Joshi
    If the general public is unaware of their origins. Maybe a genetic history of these people will tell them that they belong as much as we do. Sent from my
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 29, 2012
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      If the general public is unaware of their origins. Maybe a genetic history of these people will tell them that they 'belong' as much as we do.


      Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone


      Warm regards,

      Sumant Joshi
      Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161



      >________________________________
      > From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
      >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      >Sent: Wednesday, 29 August 2012 11:55 AM
      >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] "The first farmers" -- in accord with nature's ways, not unsustainable nor industrial ways.
      >
      >

      >Did you all already catch this quotation from James Cook 1770? Generally considered by mindful people nowadays here in Australia to have been a racist person, a spoilt (meaning at once more arrogant and more high achieving than average) English imperialist and a lieutenant--tool of the empire's invasion (only later a captain), at that time of very violent, brutal, England, often called the short-hand of Dickensian England, and from the start of the industrial revolution in the prior 100 years with coal mining and notably the English children of poor families, from as young as 4 years old, working as child slaves digging the coal often till their death.
      >(Many of James Cook's own words from quotations of his writings (eg. his diaries) are very racist, of course ignorant because he had no real knowledge of peoples (here), and completely proven wrong with scholarly evidence today---about peoples who are Australian Aborigines. Scholarly evidenced from, for some examples:
      >* linguistics (eg. R.M.W. Dixon's huge body of scholarly linguistics (Australian (Aborigines) languages literature, and Eve Fesl's body of work on the same--herself a Gubbi Gubbi & Gangalu (SE QLD) women and PhD in linguistics)
      >* archaeology (eg. Paul Memmot's scholarly literature),
      >* nature farming (eg. some of Thomas Mitchell's, Dawson's, Leichhardt's, etc. etc. writings in the 1800s; eg. Beth Gott's, Rosemary Hill's, Bruce Pascoe's, Rupert Gerritsen's, Bill Gammage's present day scholarly and literary re-analysis writings, etc.)
      >* Eve Fesl's, Marcia Langton's, Jackie Huggin's, etc. scholarly present day writings also, on peoples who are Aborigines' own educational, philosophical, social, legal, governance, political, religious systems, etc.
      >* Many 'white' anthropologist's scholarly writings on philosophical, social, religious and relationships systems clearly evidenced as actually, in fact, a far higher standard, than that of the 1770--1788 Western Europeans (or word that whatever way you will like: eg. more advanced, more sophisticated, more evolved, more civilised, more cultured, etc.) ((compare (cf.) also to: Crazy Hemenway on the subject of political rhetoric, not on the subject of actuality, on facts, quoting crazy him: "*higher philosophical [so called] plane*" --- blah blah blah.)
      >* Etcetera -- choose your discipline of human advancement, and nearly all, but not totally all (eg. not acute (non-chronic) medicine science which us, the west, gets and deserves great credit for.), have globally compelling evidence of the advancement by the many many peoples of this continent, in 1770, 1788, and continuing in many places today.
      >For one starting fact---one of many comprehensively evidenced, linguistic and cultural facts:
      >260+ mutually unintelligible, highly advanced human languages, in 1788, and collectively across all of them 6-700+ different dialects. Therefore averaging per each of the 260+ different languages about 3 mutually intelligible dialects. This is further advanced by the further scholarly evidence of most people having language faculties of not just all of their mutually intelligible dialects in their birth language, but also normally having the fully fluent faculty of 3+, often about 7 or more, different, mutually unintelligible languages, of all their neighbouring different languages. I'm now writing this email from Bama Country (Oz region), (within that the) Yidinji full language region, and the dialect and clan(s) locations within that, which in English language is nowadays called Cairns, far North Queensland.
      >This scholarly evidence is all no exaggeration at all.
      >Moreover, scholarly references will be provided to anyone who requests them from me, by private email.
      >
      >(Back to the main subject:) The quotation:
      >"
      >.in reality they are far more happier than we Europeans... They live in a Tranquillity which is not disturbed by the Inequality of Condition: The Earth and sea of their own accord furnishes them with all things necessary for life... they seem’d to set no value upon anything we gave them nor would they ever part with any thing of their own for any one article we could offer them this in my opinion argues that they think themselves provided with all the necessarys of Life and that they have no superfluities...
      >
      >James Cook, New South Wales, 23 August 1770
      >
      >"
      >
      >So indeed, Sumant, there a helluva lot not known by non-Aborigines like me and you, and even a helluva lot less again known by less well informed people than ourselves, in our Australian general public, media people and political supposed spokes persons. Even worse is the massive volume of terrible false knowledge---wilful lies---disinformation---misinformation---false histories---false philosophies---etc. that has been put around about peoples who are Australian Aborigines.
      >
      >Best wishes for true nature for and of us all,
      >
      >Jason Stewart.
      >
      >On 29/08/2012, at 2:57 PM, Sumant Joshi wrote:
      >
      >> There is a helluva lot we don't know about our aboriginal ancestors which makes us think they were not 'advanced'. But considering the facilities they had at hand makes them far more sophisticated. Imagine what would happen if are deprived of our modern amenities. We wouldn't live beyond a month. Dependence on such things has made us weak in spirit and mind and stolen our independence from us.
      >>
      >> Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone
      >>
      >> Warm regards,
      >>
      >> Sumant Joshi
      >> Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161
      >>
      >> >________________________________
      >> > From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
      >> >To: Yahoo! Discussion Group Fukuoka Farming <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      >> >Sent: Wednesday, 29 August 2012 9:51 AM
      >> >Subject: [fukuoka_farming] "The first farmers" -- in accord with nature's ways, not unsustainable nor industrial ways.
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >-- Quotation : "
      >> >The first farmers
      >> >
      >> >Date
      >> >October 1, 2011
      >> >
      >> >Tony Stephens
      >> >
      >> >Far from being hunters and gatherers, the first Australians may have managed the biggest farming estate on Earth, writes Tony Stephens.
      >> >
      >> >Working the land ... Joseph Lycett's c.1817 watercolour, Aborigines Using Fire to Hunt Kangaroos, depicts the innovative use of fire burning. Photo: National Library
      >> >
      >> >THE still common assumption is that Aboriginal Australians in 1788 were simple hunter-gatherers who relied on chance for survival and moulded their lives to the country where they lived. Historian Bill Gammage might have driven the last nail into the coffin of this notion.
      >> >
      >> >Rather, Gammage argues, the first Australians worked a complex system of land management, with fire their biggest ally, and drew on the life cycles of plants and the natural flow of water to ensure plentiful wildlife and plant foods throughout the year. They managed, he says, the biggest estate on Earth.
      >> >
      >> >The publishers of his new book, The Biggest Estate on Earth: How Aborigines Made Australia, say it rewrites the history of the continent. It's a big claim. But not too big, Gammage says. ''When I look at the subject, I think, that's right. When I think it's my claim, I think people might regard me as a mug lair. But I believe the book will lead to a rethink of what the Aborigines did.''
      >> >
      >> >Henry Reynolds, the historian who has written extensively on the effect of white settlement on indigenous Australians, says in a foreword: ''He [Gammage] establishes without question the scale of Aboriginal land management, the intelligence, skill and inherited knowledge which informed it.''
      >> >
      >> >Gammage draws striking conclusions from more than a decade's research
      >> >
      >> >...
      >> >
      >> >"
      >> >
      >> >-- Australia's major, intelligent newspapers. And not from Australian politic's newspapers of the reactionary (backward) side -- of a one dimensional version of politics (so called "right" & "left").
      >> >-- Read more:
      >> >→ http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/books/the-first-farmers-20110930-1l1gv.html
      >> >→ http://www.theage.com.au/entertainment/books/the-first-farmers-20110930-1l1gv.html
      >> >
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