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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Confusion

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  • Ruthie Aquino
    Dear Jason, I can never mistake you for Mr. Wicker or him for you. Writing styles, verbiage, and mindsets are worlds apart. I respect both. As you recommended
    Message 1 of 6 , May 4, 2012
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      Dear Jason,
      I can never mistake you for Mr. Wicker or him for you.
      Writing styles, verbiage, and mindsets are worlds apart.
      I respect both.
      As you recommended below I shall blindly and unquestioningly follow
      Fukuoka's recommendation not to plow or scrape my land.
      best
      RUTHIE
      2012/5/4 Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>

      > Very very briefly, to head off a potential very serious brutal
      > mis-construing of late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's message on not plowing.
      > It, not plowing---saying: "It's the exception which proves the rule" in
      > other words: 'the rule of nature gets completely proven as a cardinal
      > (general) rule by its one and only exception'---the (cardinal) first
      > principle of soil--nature health.
      > The idea, if you do any plowing at all which in principle you must not –
      > the idea of the one last plowing after many many plowings, is the one
      > critical last soil mass destruction activity and opportunity, for which you
      > must get the conditions for the self--repair of the soil after it,
      > absolutely right for the future of your soil and nature farm. If this last
      > chance to get the conditions for the soil's own self--repair absolutely
      > right, compared to the previous treatments done on that land after previous
      > plowings. It's a last mass soil and vegetation destruction chance, to sow
      > seeds of a very diverse mix of nature (farming) crops, rather than the
      > using conventional plowing--based farming of: plow to destroy vegetation
      > and soil life and then sow a minimal living (diminished and barely natural)
      > monoculture, or minimal diversity polyculture. Late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei
      > was emphatically clear that it is necessary to sow approximately 100 or so
      > of the widest possible diversity of kinds of seed plant species appropriate
      > for local conditions. Including, to initially include Buckwheat in all
      > suitable climates as a soil phosphorus solubliser--mobiliser, and to
      > include a full complement of diversity of locally appropriate nitrogen
      > fixing seed plant species, including the plant families: Fabaceae
      > Mimosaceae
      > Casuarinaceae
      > and so on...
      >
      > If as i understand Ruthie's land is, never recently plowed, only
      > mown/slashed many many times, making a grass severely diminished
      > growing--height--environment,
      > then it must not be plowed, for it still has natural soil structure and
      > micro-organisms, only limited compared to a forest by the limitation of
      > food and resources in such a severely diminished
      > growing--height--environment--micro-organism--habitat. Plowing that would
      > be deeply counter--productive. Much better ways are ready and waiting to be
      > used for those with the imagination to take nature's and late Fukuoka
      > Masanobu sensei's advice and not preoccupied with industrial gardening's
      > and farming's formulaic ways. Any looking for a spoon fed prescriptive
      > formula (by defintion) lacks the imagination to work it out from first
      > principles themselves (nature's and late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's first
      > principles
      >
      > ...only plow one last time a field that has already been plowed many times
      > to the point of destruction of all destroyable micro-organisms. One last
      > time is an indispensable part of that message, and the plowing message can
      > not be taken outside of that part of it.
      > Never plow or till a soil in nature which has not been destroyed already
      > as much as many times plowing does.
      > Tilling is killing -- unless everything that tilling does kill has
      > previously already been killed (really dead), then tilling just keeps the
      > dead micro-organisms from the slow process of re-colonising from the
      > nearest biologically intact and healthy natural soils, eg. if there are any
      > nearby forests.
      > ...
      > Late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's source on this---i know the place where he
      > wrote this---was absolutely clear and emphatic. My words above spell out
      > more his meaning, in that his writing source on that message. It is
      > absolutely not him diminishing the generality and proof of the rule, the
      > principle, of no plowing because it is proven absolutely unnecessary.
      > ...
      > Let's be clear and fully encouraged that nature works (by itself,
      > regardless of our egos) including in far far superior natural ways of
      > aeration of the soil, with many many micro-organisms and macro-organisms
      > (eg. the over-emphasised worms---as they are only one of thousand of soil
      > organisms)
      > ...
      >
      > Sorry for an immediate reply with no good copyediting for good easily
      > readable wording.
      >
      > Jason Stewart
      > --currently in Cairns, Bama country, The Wet Tropics of far north
      > Queensland.
      > --Openly accepting of (my) membership of, my part within, nature.
      > --by the way for those who in the past were confused: i have not anything
      > in common with Jason Wicker of New Jersey USA, here i am in Australia and
      > am very carefully, scholarly specific (as above) and very gentle/shy with
      > newly friendly people. Jason Wicker do not masquerade as myself to Fukuoka
      > farming people i have contact with, who speak English as a second language
      > and may find it hard to decipher your attempts at making ambiguous your
      > identity as contrasted with my identity. I have been warned by these
      > Fukuoka farming contacts about your doing exactly that devious activity
      > some time ago, and now you have been warned off doing that. I will act to
      > ban you from the social networks involved if you try to imposter me or try
      > to make ambiguous my identity as contrasted with yours. Social networks
      > have very strong clear rules about identity theft and identity
      > masquerading. Please eat some humble pie, buddy.
      >
      > On 04/05/2012, at 9:17 AM, Jason Wicker wrote:
      >
      > > Hello,
      > > I remember Master Fukuoka saying in one of his books that you may need to
      > > plow one last time to get things started. Once the process begins than
      > the
      > > labor of plowing is over for good and you can enjoy nature and take a nap
      > > next year instead of turning the soil:)
      > > Jason from NJ
      > >
      > > On Thu, May 3, 2012 at 5:55 PM, John Kintree <jkintree@...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > > **
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > We have almost a quarter acre of a back yard, mostly covered with grass
      > > > growing in extremely clay soil, for the house to which we moved about a
      > > > year ago. A month ago, I broadcast a mix of clover (5 lbs), birdsfoot
      > > > trefoil (2 lbs), and alfalfa (3 lbs) seeds across the grass. The seeds
      > > > cost about $84, including shipping and delivery. A day or two after
      > > > broadcasting the seeds, I mowed the grass. It rained several times in
      > the
      > > > next few days; almost ideal conditions. Nothing came up. I think the
      > > > roots of the grass are just too dense and matted for much of anything
      > else
      > > > get through to the soil.
      > > >
      > > > A couple of weeks after that, I got out my shovel, turned over the
      > soil in
      > > > several 3 to 4 feet diameter patches around the yard, scattered clover
      > > > seeds ($5 for 1 lb from a local nursery) over these patches, and
      > within a
      > > > week, had clover sprouting. It's looking pretty good by now.
      > > >
      > > > To test things more thoroughly, I spent another $32 to have 1 lb each
      > of
      > > > the clover, birdsfoot trefoil, and alfalfa shipped from the original
      > > > supplier. Turned the soil in a number of patches around the yard,
      > > > scattered the seeds over those patches, and just one week later, I have
      > > > plants of all three types of seeds sprouting through the soil. I'm sure
      > > > Fukuoka-san was correct in his situation. In a different situation,
      > > > different methods might be needed.
      > > >
      > > > BTW, the purpose for growing green manure crops is to improve the soil
      > > > before planting nut and fruit trees maybe later this year or next
      > spring.
      > > > Regards,
      > > > John Kintree
      > > >
      > > > --- On Thu, 5/3/12, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > From: Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...>
      > > > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Almond Tree and Apricot Tree nuts
      > > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Date: Thursday, May 3, 2012, 4:32 PM
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Dear friends,
      > > >
      > > > I must thank Jason for taking time out from his busy schedule to post a
      > > >
      > > > comprehensive answer that is an eye opener.
      > > >
      > > > Kostas, thanks for the encouraging words. However as Jason said in his
      > > >
      > > > post the land is used to getting mowed and the roots of the grasses are
      > > >
      > > > matted. There are dandelions and clover and I think what is called
      > > >
      > > > plantain with long forked roots, but all the available empty space is
      > > >
      > > > covered with thick vegetation. I have so much green stuff that I
      > wonder if
      > > >
      > > > the domesticated vegetable seeds stand a chance in the tall grass.
      > > >
      > > > Right now it looks so discouraging with all the right natural plants in
      > > >
      > > > what my formatted mind says is the wrong place for them.
      > > >
      > > > To think I have been looking forward to savoring some easy
      > succes...alas!
      > > >
      > > > do-nothing agriculture doesn't turn out to be so simple.
      > > >
      > > > Jason recommended scything. I chopped off the tallest tops this p.m.
      > > >
      > > > ...after having found one of the last persons with a scythe in my
      > > >
      > > > neighborhood. Of course I could not see the seedballs so I must have
      > > >
      > > > trampled a number of them.
      > > >
      > > > Seems like natural farming is a tall order in an urban setting.
      > > >
      > > > It's nice to read Fukuoka sensei and dream.
      > > >
      > > > It is quite another thing to actually do what he did.
      > > >
      > > > Well...it took him years to actually succeed in applying to agriculture
      > > >
      > > > what he saw in a flash.
      > > >
      > > > Looks like I'm in for a long wait.
      > > >
      > > > Friends, I need your help to go on with this.
      > > >
      > > > I'm arguing with my husband, he says I should have scraped the land
      > off the
      > > >
      > > > thick vegetation before planting the clover, but I said natural farming
      > > >
      > > > does no such thing. Maybe I should have followed his advice.
      > > >
      > > > What say you???
      > > >
      > > > best
      > > >
      > > > RUTHIE
      > > >
      > > > 2012/5/4 KONSTANTINOS <karoubas@...>
      > > >
      > > > > **
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > Hi Ruth,
      > > >
      > > > > and congratulations on your project.
      > > >
      > > > > I have a few questions.
      > > >
      > > > > The weeds growing, you said are knee high - are they strong and heavy
      > > >
      > > > > (closely spaced) - in other words do you have a lot of biomass, or
      > are
      > > > they
      > > >
      > > > > far apart - does the sun dry out the soil or is it well protected by
      > the
      > > >
      > > > > "weeds"
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > If you have good soil, full of organic material and "life" you will
      > have
      > > >
      > > > > success. Do as our good friend Raju suggests - spread seed balls or
      > > > direct
      > > >
      > > > > seed and then level the weeds with an angle iron, then water well.
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > Kostas
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Ruthie Aquino
      > <ruthieaquino1@
      > > > ...>
      > > >
      > > > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > Hello Jason, hello all,
      > > >
      > > > > > Thank you for your encouragement, Jason.
      > > >
      > > > > > Now here's a question.
      > > >
      > > > > > For the first time this Spring I have thrown seed balls in what
      > can be
      > > >
      > > > > > called a "big" urban lot of 300 square meters formerly cut grass
      > area,
      > > > as
      > > >
      > > > > > opposed to last year's manageable 30 square meters of relatively
      > > >
      > > > > weed-free
      > > >
      > > > > > vegetable plot.
      > > >
      > > > > > Two weeks after the sowing the rains came and did not stop for
      > another
      > > >
      > > > > two
      > > >
      > > > > > weeks. Day and night temperatures did not exceed 8°C.
      > > >
      > > > > > Now the rains have stopped and the night temperature is still
      > around
      > > > 5°C
      > > >
      > > > > > while the day temperature is around 20°C, since yesterday.
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > My question is, what happens now that the weeds are knee high and
      > the
      > > >
      > > > > > seedballs not all sprouted except for the radishes?
      > > >
      > > > > > There is a mixture of all kinds of seeds of common vegetables, and
      > > > adzuki
      > > >
      > > > > > (a first, I don't even know how it's cooked).
      > > >
      > > > > > Will the future sprouted seeds not choke in the tall grass?
      > > >
      > > > > > I still have to plant more tomaotes, plus some eggplants and
      > melons,
      > > >
      > > > > > lentils, white beans, corn, and a pinch each of grains I was given
      > > >
      > > > > during a
      > > >
      > > > > > farm visit last Sunday.
      > > >
      > > > > > In my region all danger of frost is gone about mid-May.
      > > >
      > > > > > Do I cut the weeds, in doing so I will be stepping on the
      > seedballs and
      > > >
      > > > > > seedlings?
      > > >
      > > > > > Please advise.
      > > >
      > > > > > Best
      > > >
      > > > > > RUTHIE
      > > >
      > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > 2012/5/3 Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > Thanks friend Kostas, very much, for motivating words.
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > i suppose you will be pleased to know that i also have many
      > plants
      > > >
      > > > > > > directed seeded.
      > > >
      > > > > > > In Melbourne from my previous lifeóstarted 25 years agoódoing
      > > >
      > > > > ecological
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > restoration in bushlands.
      > > >
      > > > > > > And in my nature farm with fruit trees and vegetables, since my
      > late
      > > >
      > > > > > > father farmed it from 25 years ago, and many more direct seedings
      > > >
      > > > > since i
      > > >
      > > > > > > farmed it from 12 years ago, after my father died.
      > > >
      > > > > > > In my nature farm my Avocado trees are allóevery single
      > oneódirect
      > > >
      > > > > seeded
      > > >
      > > > > > > only, and the two oldest ones are now about 9ñ10 foot too,
      > > >
      > > > > coincidently
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > with yours.
      > > >
      > > > > > > And yes, Apricots do well, some direct seeded and/or self seeded,
      > > > now 5
      > > >
      > > > > > > years old and already about 20 foot high but still thin growing
      > > > amongst
      > > >
      > > > > > > taller natural Acacia mearnsii trees,
      > > >
      > > > > > > there in far eastern Victoria, S.E. Australia, warm temperate
      > climate
      > > >
      > > > > with
      > > >
      > > > > > > no snow and little in the way of frosts ñat the most extreme
      > frost
      > > > to
      > > >
      > > > > -8 C.
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > i have successfully direct seeded many vegetables (not even
      > needing
      > > > the
      > > >
      > > > > > > use of seed balls):
      > > >
      > > > > > > Buckwheat (most notably!)
      > > >
      > > > > > > Grain Amaranth (most notably! from central & south America)
      > > >
      > > > > > > Quinoa (most notably! from Bolivia)
      > > >
      > > > > > > Sweet Corn
      > > >
      > > > > > > Mung Beans
      > > >
      > > > > > > Carrots
      > > >
      > > > > > > Alfalfa
      > > >
      > > > > > > Fenugreek
      > > >
      > > > > > > Bok Choi
      > > >
      > > > > > > Snow Peas
      > > >
      > > > > > > Cucumbers
      > > >
      > > > > > > Watermelons
      > > >
      > > > > > > Beetroots
      > > >
      > > > > > > Tomatoes
      > > >
      > > > > > > Capsicums
      > > >
      > > > > > > Zucchini
      > > >
      > > > > > > Button Squash
      > > >
      > > > > > > etcetera
      > > >
      > > > > > > Native Bulbine lilies (edible).
      > > >
      > > > > > > etcetera
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > Natural self seeding of:
      > > >
      > > > > > > Asparagus
      > > >
      > > > > > > Locally native Acacia mearnsii ñmany thousands of plants.
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > Apricots
      > > >
      > > > > > > Nectarines
      > > >
      > > > > > > Peaches
      > > >
      > > > > > > A little of previous year's Buckwheat and Amaranth crops
      > (commercial
      > > >
      > > > > > > farmers refer to as volunteers)
      > > >
      > > > > > > etcetera
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > And my direct sowing of tubers/corms/bulbs/... of:
      > > >
      > > > > > > Garlic
      > > >
      > > > > > > Jerusalem artichokes
      > > >
      > > > > > > etcetera
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > As a green thumb person since i was 13 years old, in my then
      > teenager
      > > >
      > > > > > > cooperative relationship with the Melbourne Botanical Gardens
      > > >
      > > > > propagating
      > > >
      > > > > > > rainforest plant species in my mother's home garden;
      > > >
      > > > > > > i see no reason at all any more these days to sow seeds in pots.
      > > >
      > > > > > > Personally i have enough practical experienceóover 25 yearsówith
      > > >
      > > > > plants
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > growing themselves well in my plant propagation practises,
      > > >
      > > > > > > to nowadays be able to successfully predict the direct field
      > seeding
      > > >
      > > > > > > requirements of many temperate climate plant species, for their
      > > >
      > > > > germination
      > > >
      > > > > > > and (self-)establishment as strong plants.
      > > >
      > > > > > > In any members of this group who have a background growing up in
      > > >
      > > > > farming
      > > >
      > > > > > > and in nature i think it is fair that, and i think we should,
      > take it
      > > >
      > > > > for
      > > >
      > > > > > > granted that these kind of people already have genuine practical
      > > >
      > > > > experience
      > > >
      > > > > > > and 'green thumbs' (more or less).
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > My point of view is:
      > > >
      > > > > > > Of course late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei is right about direct
      > seeding
      > > >
      > > > > and
      > > >
      > > > > > > much more.
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > Let's (Let us) all feel greatly encouraged!!! ñ
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > my meaning of all the above information is to greatly increase
      > the
      > > >
      > > > > > > encouragement of all of us members of this group,
      > > >
      > > > > > > to have a go to implement, firstly without any questioning, late
      > > >
      > > > > Fukuoka
      > > >
      > > > > > > Masanobu sensei's expert and long experience, worldwide.
      > > >
      > > > > > > Then later secondarily, or if failures arise, start questioning
      > > >
      > > > > itólate
      > > >
      > > > > > > Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's waysóand more soómore importantlyóstart
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > questioning each of our personal biases, mistaken awarenesses of,
      > > >
      > > > > mistaken
      > > >
      > > > > > > informations about, interpretation of, misperceptions of, late
      > > > Fukuoka
      > > >
      > > > > > > Masanobu sensei's ways.
      > > >
      > > > > > > Over the last 10 years of my involvement in Fukuoka farming
      > including
      > > >
      > > > > this
      > > >
      > > > > > > group:
      > > >
      > > > > > > Virtually every time i've ever heard of people (in this group and
      > > >
      > > > > > > elsewhere), worldwide, failing in their trying to implement late
      > > >
      > > > > Fukuoka
      > > >
      > > > > > > Masanobu sensei's ways,
      > > >
      > > > > > > it has been to me very easy to explain their failures by their
      > own
      > > >
      > > > > > > mistaken awarenesses and/or mistaken informations about his
      > ways, and
      > > >
      > > > > > > cannot be explained by any proposed failure(s) of nature,
      > itself, nor
      > > >
      > > > > of
      > > >
      > > > > > > late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's ways and awareness of nature.
      > > >
      > > > > > > Nature works (by itself, of course. Regardless of our egos!)!
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > Firstly,
      > > >
      > > > > > > Let's (Let us) all (all newcomers) 'give it a try, directly' and
      > > >
      > > > > exactly
      > > >
      > > > > > > in the way late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei means it to be practised
      > (ie.
      > > >
      > > > > > > really faithfully),
      > > >
      > > > > > > without inserting any of our own biases. (ie. newcomers: try
      > > > something
      > > >
      > > > > > > different, being his ways, if you're not already 'biased' in the
      > same
      > > >
      > > > > way
      > > >
      > > > > > > as he is: aligned (with nature)).
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > Jason Stewart
      > > >
      > > > > > > --currently in Cairns, Bama country, The Wet Tropics of far north
      > > >
      > > > > > > Queensland.
      > > >
      > > > > > > --Openly accepting of (my) membership of, my part within, nature.
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > On 02/05/2012, at 2:50 PM, KONSTANTINOS wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > Thanks Jason
      > > >
      > > > > > > > I will keep it in mind - I will look for it - If jujube is
      > readily
      > > >
      > > > > > > available to you from trees in your area, may be you can try to
      > see
      > > > if
      > > >
      > > > > they
      > > >
      > > > > > > grow without any assistance, and then report back.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > Its simple - just place 4 -5 stones in the ground and make a
      > note
      > > > to
      > > >
      > > > > > > look at them in a year or so.
      > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > I have trees growing from seed in my farm that are 9 feet tall
      > -
      > > > they
      > > >
      > > > > > > are very strong, as they have grown without any watering or care.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > Fukuoka -San was right about seed grown trees.
      > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > Kostas
      > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Jason Stewart
      > > > <macropneuma@>
      > > >
      > > > > > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > Dear friend Kostas,
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > One additional fruit tree species that immediately comes to
      > my
      > > > mind
      > > >
      > > > > > > from desert like conditions in east Asia, which you may not have
      > > >
      > > > > considered
      > > >
      > > > > > > is:
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > Jujube (sometimes jujuba),
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > red date, Chinese date, Korean date, or Indian date
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > _Ziziphus_zizyphus_
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > i love to eat the very sweet AND very healthy (?even
      > medicinal
      > > >
      > > > > food?)
      > > >
      > > > > > > dates kind of fruit---buying them in Asian and wholefood shops
      > here
      > > > in
      > > >
      > > > > > > Australia.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > i'm sorry that as yet i haven't got experience to share of
      > > > growing
      > > >
      > > > > > > them myself.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > i have heard from people who have them growing and that they
      > can
      > > > be
      > > >
      > > > > > > grown in deserts,
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > as they are naturally ((r)evolutionarily) adapted to these
      > desert
      > > >
      > > > > > > regions as their natural home.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > Some salient quick quotations from Wikipedia:
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > ‚Ü'„ÄÄhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jujube
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > "
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > Jujube was domesticated in South Asia by 9000 BCE.[5] Over
      > 400
      > > >
      > > > > > > cultivars have been selected.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > The tree tolerates a wide range of temperatures and rainfall,
      > > >
      > > > > though
      > > >
      > > > > > > it requires hot summers and sufficient water for acceptable
      > fruiting.
      > > >
      > > > > > > Unlike most of the other species in the genus, it tolerates
      > fairly
      > > > cold
      > > >
      > > > > > > winters, surviving temperatures down to about ∠'15 °C (5
      > > >
      > > > > °F). This
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > enables the jujube to grow in the mountain desert habitats,
      > provided
      > > >
      > > > > there
      > > >
      > > > > > > is access to underground water through the summer. The species
      > > >
      > > > > Z.zizyphus
      > > >
      > > > > > > grows in cooler regions of Asia. Five or more other species of
      > > >
      > > > > Ziziphus are
      > > >
      > > > > > > widely distributed in milder climates to hot deserts of Asia and
      > > >
      > > > > Africa.
      > > >
      > > > > > > (ref. S. Chaudhary. Rhamnaceae in : S. Chaudhary (Edit.). Flora
      > of
      > > > the
      > > >
      > > > > > > Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Vol II(Part One) 2001.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > Its precise natural distribution is uncertain due to
      > extensive
      > > >
      > > > > > > cultivation, but is thought to be in southern Asia, between
      > Lebanon,
      > > >
      > > > > Iran,
      > > >
      > > > > > > Pakistan, India,Bangladesh, Nepal (called as Bayar), the Korean
      > > >
      > > > > peninsula,
      > > >
      > > > > > > and southern and central China, and also southeastern Europe
      > though
      > > >
      > > > > more
      > > >
      > > > > > > likely introduced there.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > It is a small deciduous tree or shrub reaching a height of
      > > >
      > > > > 5‚Ä"10 m,
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > usually with thorny branches. The leaves are shiny-green,
      > > > ovate-acute,
      > > >
      > > > > > > 2‚Ä"7-cm wide and 1‚Ä"3-cm broad, with three conspicuous veins
      > > >
      > > > > at the base,
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > and a finely toothed margin. The flowers are small, 5-mm wide,
      > with
      > > >
      > > > > five
      > > >
      > > > > > > inconspicuous yellowish-green petals. The fruit is an edible oval
      > > > drupe
      > > >
      > > > > > > 1.5‚Ä"3-cm deep; when immature it is smooth-green, with the
      > > >
      > > > > consistency and
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > taste of an apple, maturing brown to purplish-black and
      > eventually
      > > >
      > > > > > > wrinkled, looking like a small date. There is a single hard stone
      > > >
      > > > > similar
      > > >
      > > > > > > to an olive stone.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > "
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > Here in Australia they are sold as the common name Chinese
      > Dates.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > Biggest best true nature with all of you,
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > Jason Stewart
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > --currently in Cairns, Bama country, The Wet Tropics of far
      > north
      > > >
      > > > > > > Queensland.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > --Openly accepting of (my) membership of, my part within,
      > nature.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > On 01/05/2012, at 1:25 AM, KONSTANTINOS wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Thanks Ruthie
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > I will definitely try wild peach - if I can find stones of
      > wild
      > > >
      > > > > > > peach - a company in Italy (florsilva) sells stones of what it
      > > >
      > > > > describes as
      > > >
      > > > > > > wild peach tree - I may try them if I have to.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > The cost of placing a stone/nut in the ground is minuscule
      > in
      > > >
      > > > > > > comparison to buying a young tree and watering it for a year or
      > two.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > I hope these trees (almond, apricot, wild peach and maybe
      > > >
      > > > > nectarine)
      > > >
      > > > > > > will be tried in desert like conditions - like southern Greece (
      > I
      > > > will
      > > >
      > > > > > > definitely try them), Arizona/Texas, Palestine/Israel and the
      > desert
      > > >
      > > > > like
      > > >
      > > > > > > places of India.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Again its important to properly collect seeds - store
      > bought
      > > >
      > > > > fruit
      > > >
      > > > > > > is not suitable, because they cut the fruits prematurely and
      > store
      > > >
      > > > > them in
      > > >
      > > > > > > refrigerators, so the stones/nuts do not germinate
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > Kostas
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Ruthie Aquino
      > > >
      > > > > > > <ruthieaquino1@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > Hello Kostas,
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > In my experience, wild peach also grows without any kind
      > of
      > > >
      > > > > care.
      > > >
      > > > > > > Just
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > throw the stone after eating.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > Since I am still bound by my old fears engendered by
      > > > scientific
      > > >
      > > > > > > farming, my
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > first experiment was to put the stones in a pot with
      > earth.
      > > >
      > > > > They
      > > >
      > > > > > > grew, of
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > course. So I tried the same thing with red peach last
      > summer,
      > > >
      > > > > that
      > > >
      > > > > > > grew of
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > course.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > Now those tiny trees are planted in the ground. I use the
      > > > young
      > > >
      > > > > > > leaves to
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > flavor a delicious liquor. I noticed however that this
      > year
      > > >
      > > > > which
      > > >
      > > > > > > is very
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > rainy the leaves curl and blister. I think peach doesn't
      > like
      > > >
      > > > > rain.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > The friend who gave me the red peaches got them from a
      > > >
      > > > > tree...that
      > > >
      > > > > > > grew
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > from a stone she left on the ground. Now hers is a tall
      > tree
      > > >
      > > > > but
      > > >
      > > > > > > rather
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > thin because it is not watered or fertilized, but we
      > don't
      > > >
      > > > > care,
      > > >
      > > > > > > do we? We
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > just want some nice fruit.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > Happy n-farming.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > RUTHIE
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > 2012/4/30 KONSTANTINOS <karoubas@>
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > **
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > I have in the past discussed the strength/virtues of
      > the
      > > >
      > > > > Almond
      > > >
      > > > > > > tree
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > in reforestation efforts - how without watering or any
      > care
      > > >
      > > > > an
      > > >
      > > > > > > almond nut
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > buried in the ground will produce a tree even in arid -
      > > >
      > > > > desert
      > > >
      > > > > > > like
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > conditions. To me this amazing - a person can devote an
      > > > hour
      > > >
      > > > > of
      > > >
      > > > > > > his/her
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > life and create a mini forest using almond nuts. Care
      > of
      > > >
      > > > > course
      > > >
      > > > > > > must be
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > taken to collect nuts from healthy and disease free
      > trees -
      > > >
      > > > > not
      > > >
      > > > > > > to old or
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > young - etc etc.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > To the almond tree, I think we can add the apricot
      > tree -
      > > > it
      > > >
      > > > > has
      > > >
      > > > > > > the same
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > abilities - I have been placing apricot nuts in
      > different
      > > >
      > > > > places
      > > >
      > > > > > > and
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > without care they do well and grow small trees.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > I hope other volunteers will try this in arid/barren
      > places
      > > >
      > > > > and
      > > >
      > > > > > > report
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > back on the results. Also if you have any experience
      > with
      > > >
      > > > > other
      > > >
      > > > > > > trees that
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > have the same characteristics please let us know.
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > > Kostas
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > ------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > > > >
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > h
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > Thanks and all the best,
      > > Jason
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jason Stewart
      Not you at all Ruthie. No worries, Ruthie, ...so unfortunately it was late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei s Japanese associates (One of them told me and warned me
      Message 2 of 6 , May 4, 2012
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        Not you at all Ruthie.
        No worries, Ruthie,
        ...so unfortunately it was late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's Japanese associates (One of them told me and warned me about what not pleasant things happened to them) who were misled by him, a while ago 'doing a lot of playing' (messing) with their uncertainty about which Jason was which, instead of having any kindness towards them to immediately explain to them about himself not being me at all.
        ...
        This is not to be encouraged.

        On 04/05/2012, at 6:42 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:

        > Dear Jason,
        > I can never mistake you for Mr. Wicker or him for you.
        > Writing styles, verbiage, and mindsets are worlds apart.
        > I respect both.
        > As you recommended below I shall blindly and unquestioningly follow
        > Fukuoka's recommendation not to plow or scrape my land.
        > best
        > RUTHIE



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jason Wicker
        Jason from Down under, In my opinion your long rants confuse knowledge with wisdom. Please read some quotes from Master Fukuoka and apply them towards your
        Message 3 of 6 , May 4, 2012
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          Jason from Down under,
          In my opinion your long rants confuse knowledge with wisdom.
          Please read some quotes from Master Fukuoka and apply them towards your
          misguided anger.
          Perhaps out of this adversity we both can learn something?
          Jason from NJ

          Revolutionary Verses ~
          by Fukuoka Masanobu
          ...
          First of all, throw it all away,
          the handcuffs of time and the shackles of money.

          The essence of natural farming is not the specific technique, but our
          ability to fit in with nature as a rightful partner, not as a conquerer.

          ...
          Too much wasted time,
          too many useless things.

          Knowledge is not wisdom,
          collecting knowledge, we destroy wisdom.
          ...
          The fruit from the tree of wisdom is the wisdom of the snake,
          idly we are led astray.
          ...
          Pointless reasons and arguments, like the straw shoes of a horse,
          changed daily, they are discarded after use.

          The cherry flowers blossom, still too early to scatter,
          only humans regret the futility of flowers.
          ...
          No ears to listen and no speech, mountains, rivers, grasses and trees,
          the hidden language knows the heavens, knows Earth.
          ...
          Coming and going, the passing birds don�t stay in one place,
          freely, only living.
          ...
          Don�t look around with two eyes,
          the one eye of the mind is enough.
          ...
          The desire to see, listen and know will be your ruin,
          an ocean of wisdom that gets weak and dies.

          We only live once,
          with a one-way ticket, whither do you go? whither do you return?

          Don�t hurry, don�t get excited,
          leave it to nature, leave behind human knowledge and human action.
          ...
          After much fussing I finally passed my 90th year,
          after that there is only letting go, and be the Buddha.
          ...
          I have lived my destiny, the life and destiny of the planet,
          this instant only, the death of a beggar, all by myself.
          ...
          Destiny has run its course, separating God, nature and humans,
          with a crash, the Earth is annihilated.
          ...
          The crow craws and returns to its nest,
          are the withered leaves scattered? has the sparrow flown?
          a sunny spot in winter.
          ...
          The day comes to an end, the sun takes its leave,
          the trees loose their leaves, the sparrow�s nest for the night.
          ...
          We see the same moon whether we are in Japan, Africa or Europe. It is the
          same world...the same nature. We are a part of it, not separate." (Fukuoka)





          On Fri, May 4, 2012 at 5:38 AM, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Not you at all Ruthie.
          > No worries, Ruthie,
          > ...so unfortunately it was late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's Japanese
          > associates (One of them told me and warned me about what not pleasant
          > things happened to them) who were misled by him, a while ago 'doing a lot
          > of playing' (messing) with their uncertainty about which Jason was which,
          > instead of having any kindness towards them to immediately explain to them
          > about himself not being me at all.
          > ...
          > This is not to be encouraged.
          >
          >
          > On 04/05/2012, at 6:42 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:
          >
          > > Dear Jason,
          > > I can never mistake you for Mr. Wicker or him for you.
          > > Writing styles, verbiage, and mindsets are worlds apart.
          > > I respect both.
          > > As you recommended below I shall blindly and unquestioningly follow
          > > Fukuoka's recommendation not to plow or scrape my land.
          > > best
          > > RUTHIE
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >



          --
          Thanks and all the best,
          Jason


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jason Stewart
          Trashy cheat shot! Them superficial careless words and perverse words don t fool me for a second. Please don t fool yourself and don t anyone else be fooled by
          Message 4 of 6 , May 4, 2012
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            Trashy cheat shot! Them superficial careless words and perverse words don't fool me for a second. Please don't fool yourself and don't anyone else be fooled by this superficiality.

            All,
            leave well enough alone.


            Getting real and serious. Appropriately here:
            --transcript: -> http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1993865,00.html
            --video: -> http://www.time.com/time/video/player/0,32068,89819851001_1994021,00.html


            Coincidently on Facebook right now, as i write here---this apropos quotation:
            "
            Barefoot Zen
            If we want to succeed in life and bring about a more peaceful world, we must learn to control our emotions and not to be affected by a moment of anger.

            ~ Master Hsing Yun, "Don't Get Mad, Don't Get Even"
            "

            Several hours the day before yesterday was spent with Japanese friends reading and learning more again from late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's Japanese words and professional English translation words.

            On 05/05/2012, at 1:59 AM, Jason Wicker wrote:

            > Jason from Down under,
            > In my opinion your long rants confuse knowledge with wisdom.
            > Please read some quotes from Master Fukuoka and apply them towards your
            > misguided anger.
            > Perhaps out of this adversity we both can learn something?
            > Jason from NJ
            >

            That's not late Fukuoka Masanobu's sensei's words, but a terribly bad rip off, by a certain translator wannabee (who i shall also not give any name to---leave well enough alone, too), which you have now copy and pasted---aweful! That certain person was very clearly told to cease and destist.
            The genuine English translation of his Iroha Revolutionary Verses was professionally done by a team of Japanese and international translators, in a beautifully presented and wonderful bilingual Japanese and English publication. It is available worldwide for purchase. Not in rip off, terribly bad, wannabee--translation on the trashy (copyright--breaching) online world. Early last year i have received the real one and eight Japanese books and two movies, all original late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei publications---published by himself and by major publisher Shunjusha, Japan. Many times i've read his genuine Iroha Revolutionary Verses (an will not trashily copy it online (for attention)).
            Over the last twelve years,
            every single word i have carefully read in context, several times, of four English translation books of his---these---original Japanese books.

            The proper word is misappropriation or expropriation.

            [snipped]



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jason Stewart
            So unfortunately: Two quotations from my private emails, from one of late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei s most important Japanese colleagues/associates and
            Message 5 of 6 , May 4, 2012
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              So unfortunately:
              Two quotations from my private emails,
              from one of late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's most important Japanese colleagues/associates and translators:

              8 October 2011

              "
              � [private email]�
              i started receiveing your mailings from facebook.
              but i can not write to you at facebook by some technical failure.
              � [private email]�
              "
              I never wrote Facebook messages to any one of late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's most important Japanese colleagues/associates and translators. I don't transgress nor disrespect anyone's private social networks or emails, unless they force me to defend, stand up, not be a doormat, my own private social networks and emails by sending a cease and desist notice to their private social network or email (Just the same last email as the last ever plowing---The exception that proves the rule. QED!). Only ever at first, many more years ago, to Larry Korn via Facebook, then transferred since many years ago to email with him.


              Again:

              Dec 12, 2011

              "
              [private email] ...
              lately someone called Jason Wicker started sending me FACEBOOK article almost every day. i noticed it and i believed it was from you, Jason in Australia.

              i could not manage to reply to Facebook, so i determined to write to you(not jason Wicker in NJ, USA) about
              � [private email]�
              � [private email]�
              i apologize for what happened to our communications so far...
              � [private email]�
              "

              A much--worse--than--awkward, situation was created from both of us, by that� .

              It---'the rot'---evidently started from some period of time after this polite and humbly given request for clear identification of a person's identity:
              -> groups.yahoo.com / group / fukuoka_farming / message / 11344

              We both deserve a deep and sincere public apologies from you Jason Wicker -- New Jersey. Send apologies to this group. Do not send apologies to private email addresses or social networks inboxs.
              One of late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's most important colleagues/associates and translators should never have been put in a situation by you to feel the need to apologise to me, for your bad, confusing, unsolicited 'stuff'.


              i said it once, meant it, have clear evidence for it, and should never have to say again to "Jason Wicker of New Jersey": "Eat some humble pie, buddy".


              Jason Stewart
              --currently in Cairns, Bama country, The Wet Tropics of far north Queensland.
              --Openly accepting of (my) membership of, my part within, nature.

              On 04/05/2012, at 7:38 PM, Jason Stewart wrote:

              > Not you at all Ruthie.
              > No worries, Ruthie,
              > ...so unfortunately it was late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's Japanese associates (One of them told me and warned me about what not pleasant things happened to them) who were misled by him, a while ago 'doing a lot of playing' (messing) with their uncertainty about which Jason was which, instead of having any kindness towards them to immediately explain to them about himself not being me at all.
              > ...
              > This is not to be encouraged.
              >
              > On 04/05/2012, at 6:42 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:
              >
              > > Dear Jason,
              > > I can never mistake you for Mr. Wicker or him for you.
              > > Writing styles, verbiage, and mindsets are worlds apart.
              > > I respect both.
              > > As you recommended below I shall blindly and unquestioningly follow
              > > Fukuoka's recommendation not to plow or scrape my land.
              > > best
              > > RUTHIE
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Harish Amur
              In my experience, grass can be controlled by mulching. There are two distinct experiments that I have been doing, which provide enough evidence towards this
              Message 6 of 6 , May 5, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                In my experience, grass can be controlled by mulching. There are two
                distinct experiments that I have been doing, which provide enough evidence
                towards this statement. One: the mulching of sugarcane plantation. This was
                achieved by not burning the debris (leaves et al) produced(rendered?) while
                harvesting. This mulch was quite thick (about 2" or more). What I have
                observed is that the taller grass (sugar cane) does not let similar grass
                grow. However many other weeds (for the lack any other word) grow, which
                are more like ground cover crops. Parthenium grows too. However these
                ground cover crops and parthenium do not seem to affect sugar cane growth.
                Further, the mulch has reduced the need to water to a very large extent. To
                share a perspective: a typical sugar cane farm of one acre is fed 60,000
                litres of water on a weekly basis (I could be off with the estimate by a
                couple of thousand litres). Our one acre sugar cane farm was fed with
                similar amount of water once(one week) in Jan and there is still enough
                moisture in the soil even after months of scroching heat. The summer has
                been a lot more hotter this year. Of course, we did get a few showers in
                between. Here a significant take away is that the 'artificial selection' of
                growing sugarcane has worked. The 'natural selection' of wild grass growth
                has been significantly reduced.

                Second: We covered a few tall trees at our home garden (not the farm) with
                a lot of tree litter (leaves et al). Since the garden has a couple of tall
                trees and the garden was maintained clean for a long time(before we moved
                here last year), there wasn't much of a weed growth, including grass.
                However after the mulching was done, we see a lot of 'good' crops
                underneath the trees. The take away here is that if there is enough mulch
                and a favourable condition, unwanted grass does not grow.

                Philosophically, I agree with Mr. Jason that "Any looking for a spoon fed
                prescriptive formula (by defintion) lacks the imagination to work it out
                from first principles themselves". But that does not help starters. In a
                group like this, we need to get ideas. These ideas help find the first
                principles faster. Else, we can always seek higher
                moral/spiritual/philosphical territories from where even natural farming
                seems 'artificial'. We can go back to hunting and gathering OR directly
                assimilating sun's energy (http://solarhealing.com/)

                Fukuoka san is an immense source of inspiration. We need to draw from this
                inspiration and 're-discover' a more conscious way of 'life'. I would still
                say something that I wrote earlier, which was not popular. "Fukuoka San was
                a sage. If it was not for farming he would have been as spiritual in any
                other walk of life, except that farming is the most natural path that any
                such guru would seek." This statement was misunderstood. A sage is not a
                saint, but a wise old man and spirituality is not religion.

                Regards,
                Harish



                On Sat, May 5, 2012 at 6:00 AM, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>wrote:

                > So unfortunately:
                > Two quotations from my private emails,
                > from one of late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's most important Japanese
                > colleagues/associates and translators:
                >
                > 8 October 2011
                >
                > "
                > … [private email]…
                > i started receiveing your mailings from facebook.
                > but i can not write to you at facebook by some technical failure.
                > … [private email]…
                > "
                > I never wrote Facebook messages to any one of late Fukuoka Masanobu
                > sensei's most important Japanese colleagues/associates and translators. I
                > don't transgress nor disrespect anyone's private social networks or emails,
                > unless they force me to defend, stand up, not be a doormat, my own private
                > social networks and emails by sending a cease and desist notice to their
                > private social network or email (Just the same last email as the last ever
                > plowing---The exception that proves the rule. QED!). Only ever at first,
                > many more years ago, to Larry Korn via Facebook, then transferred since
                > many years ago to email with him.
                >
                >
                > Again:
                >
                > Dec 12, 2011
                >
                > "
                > [private email] ...
                > lately someone called Jason Wicker started sending me FACEBOOK article
                > almost every day. i noticed it and i believed it was from you, Jason in
                > Australia.
                >
                > i could not manage to reply to Facebook, so i determined to write to
                > you(not jason Wicker in NJ, USA) about
                > … [private email]…
                > … [private email]…
                > i apologize for what happened to our communications so far...
                > … [private email]…
                > "
                >
                > A much--worse--than--awkward, situation was created from both of us, by
                > that… .
                >
                > It---'the rot'---evidently started from some period of time after this
                > polite and humbly given request for clear identification of a person's
                > identity:
                > -> groups.yahoo.com / group / fukuoka_farming / message / 11344
                >
                > We both deserve a deep and sincere public apologies from you Jason Wicker
                > -- New Jersey. Send apologies to this group. Do not send apologies to
                > private email addresses or social networks inboxs.
                > One of late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's most important colleagues/associates
                > and translators should never have been put in a situation by you to feel
                > the need to apologise to me, for your bad, confusing, unsolicited 'stuff'.
                >
                >
                > i said it once, meant it, have clear evidence for it, and should never
                > have to say again to "Jason Wicker of New Jersey": "Eat some humble pie,
                > buddy".
                >
                >
                > Jason Stewart
                > --currently in Cairns, Bama country, The Wet Tropics of far north
                > Queensland.
                > --Openly accepting of (my) membership of, my part within, nature.
                >
                > On 04/05/2012, at 7:38 PM, Jason Stewart wrote:
                >
                > > Not you at all Ruthie.
                > > No worries, Ruthie,
                > > ...so unfortunately it was late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's Japanese
                > associates (One of them told me and warned me about what not pleasant
                > things happened to them) who were misled by him, a while ago 'doing a lot
                > of playing' (messing) with their uncertainty about which Jason was which,
                > instead of having any kindness towards them to immediately explain to them
                > about himself not being me at all.
                > > ...
                > > This is not to be encouraged.
                > >
                > > On 04/05/2012, at 6:42 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:
                > >
                > > > Dear Jason,
                > > > I can never mistake you for Mr. Wicker or him for you.
                > > > Writing styles, verbiage, and mindsets are worlds apart.
                > > > I respect both.
                > > > As you recommended below I shall blindly and unquestioningly follow
                > > > Fukuoka's recommendation not to plow or scrape my land.
                > > > best
                > > > RUTHIE
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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