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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Achieving sustainability in the use of green manures

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  • Justin .
    Larry, I was taking a look at the website. I checked the Links pages, and was rather surprised. I was expecting to find many links - so many have been posted
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 6, 2002
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      Larry, I was taking a look at the website. I checked the Links pages, and
      was rather surprised. I was expecting to find many links - so many have been
      posted on this group, so many wonderful links to wonderful things. But on
      the website I found only a shor list of things, only directly relating to
      Fukuoka. The were links for seedballs, links for seeds, and links for
      Fukuoka's books. That is all great, but don't you think that it could be a
      little broader? Personally, when I find a really good website, I am glad.
      Let's say I find a site which is really on my wavelength. Then I will
      apreciate links that are directly connected, but also links which that
      person (/persons) is also interested in. The chances are that I will also be
      interested in at least some of them. Like on Amazon, you find a book, and
      you click on "those who bought this also bought..." or those who bought this
      recommend.." I know some people feel that Fukuoka should not be mixed wth
      other things. Well, I disagree. At least in a way. I mean, even he mixes. He
      gets a lot from Buddhism, and also a lot from Daoism, for example. That is
      great. How about some Permaculture links. And links to Agroforestry. Perhaps
      to the various projects in Thailand, Sri Lanka and so on. How about to CAT
      (centre for alternative technology) which is also about living in a
      sustainable way. How about to the Schumacher college, founded on principles
      of holism, us being a part of nature, and bringing that into eduation. It is
      wonderfull that we can help open peoples' eyes to Fukuoka, and I feel that
      it can only help to also provide some links to other such good ideas. If you
      ask me, I almost feel that we are a part of the bottom-up drive system
      powering the paradigm shift that is all so important in these times, and
      networking and working together is so important for this.
      Well, that's an idea!
      Best wishes,
      Justin.

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    • Larry Haftl
      At Wednesday, 06 November 2002, Justin wrote: Hi Justin, ... It s good to know that someone is... :) ... have been ... But on ... to ... could be a ... I ve
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 6, 2002
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        At Wednesday, 06 November 2002, Justin wrote:

        Hi Justin,

        >Larry, I was taking a look at the website.

        It's good to know that someone is... :)

        > I checked the Links pages, and
        >was rather surprised. I was expecting to find many links - so many
        have been
        >posted on this group, so many wonderful links to wonderful things.
        But on
        >the website I found only a shor list of things, only directly relating
        to
        >Fukuoka. The were links for seedballs, links for seeds, and links for
        >Fukuoka's books. That is all great, but don't you think that it
        could be a
        >little broader?

        I've gone back through the entire archive and extracted all of those
        links. You are right that there are a lot of good ones there. I've
        also added a bunch of possible others gathered from my surfing/searching.
        I haven't added them to the website yet because I was waiting to
        see how the people here want to see the site develop. One option
        is to keep it as closely focused on Fukuoka as possible since there
        are no other sites that do this or provide comprehensive or extensive
        info about him and his methods. It's easy to find info about other
        methods of sustainable agriculture -- any Google search turns up
        thousands of links to such sites. It's not easy to find hardcore
        detailed info on Fukuoka and his method.

        The other possibility is what you suggest. Add a bunch of links to
        other sustainable ag sites (I also have a HUGE collection of those).
        I don't mind doing that, but I'm concerned that it might dilute
        what the Fukuoka site is all about. That's where I need input from
        other list participants.

        Even though I built and maintain the site I don't think of it as
        "mine". I don't feel I have the right or freedom to do just anything
        I want to with it. Changes and direction should come from concensus
        amongst participants of this list. Maybe your questions and suggestions
        will stir some dialog about this. I would definitely welcome that.



        >I know some people feel that Fukuoka should not be mixed wth
        >other things. Well, I disagree. At least in a way. I mean, even
        he mixes.

        The more I come to understand what he is saying and doing, the more
        I come to realize just how unique his message is. All of the other
        methods (I've spent more hours than I care to think about researching
        them) are human-centered and human-dominated. They all come at it
        with the attitude of dominating and overcoming natural processes
        even while they talk of working "with" nature. Holmgren, one of the
        co-creators of the Permaculture concept, alluded to this in that
        article Robert Monie told us about.

        Having said that, I also have to add that I agree about mixing other
        methods into the process if its needed. There are parts of Permaculture,
        agroforestry and biointensive gardening that I think can be used
        very effectively in certain circumstances.

        >He gets a lot from Buddhism, and also a lot from Daoism, for example.

        I know that he weaves a lot of Buddhist philosophy through his books,
        but in that interview with Plowboy he made the point that its all
        about farming, not religion. I get the feeling that all of the mystique
        surrounding him often obscures the fact that he was, first and foremost,
        a commercial farmer. Raising food for sale was his primary occupation
        and all the rest was wrapped around and focused on that.

        >Well, that's an idea!
        >Best wishes,
        > Justin.

        Excellent comments. It will be interesting to see what others have
        to say about all of this.

        Larry Haftl
        larry@...
        http://larryhaftl.com/fukuoka
        http://FukuokaNaturalFarming.org
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