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[fukuoka_farming] Re: NF experiences

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  • 倩 冯
    Sepp holzer s experience Farming with nature http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xd4X8oigRKk   His experience demonstrates that natural farming can make big
    Message 1 of 28 , Feb 20, 2012
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      Sepp holzer's experience
      Farming with nature
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xd4X8oigRKk
       
      His experience demonstrates that natural farming can make big success on big scale farm,too.


      ________________________________
      发件人: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
      收件人: "fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com" <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      发送日期: 2011年12月30日, 星期五, 下午 9:27
      主题: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: NF experiences



       

      Ruthie and all,

      Wish all of you/your family a happy new year !!!

      Some statements of Fukuoka San from chapter 'Simply Serve Nature and All Is Well'

      "Extravagance of desire is the fundamental cause which has led the world into its present predicament. Fast rather than slow, more rather than less- this flashy “development” is linked directly to society's impending collapse.

      "The more the farmer increases the scale of his operation, the more his body and spirit are dissipated and the further he falls away from a spiritually satisfying life. A life of small-scale farming may appear to be primitive, but in living such a life, it becomes possible to contemplate the Great Way [the path of spiritual awareness which involves attentiveness to and care for the ordinary activities of daily life]. I believe that if one fathoms deeply one's own neighborhood and the everyday world in which he lives, the greatest of worlds will be revealed".

      Regards,

      Nandan

      ________________________________
      From: Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...>
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, December 30, 2011 6:22 PM
      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: NF experiences

      Nandan,

      There are entire deserts in Mongolia the recent appearance of which is due
      to the world demand for cashmere wool.
      Desertification and forest destruction is alarming. They in turn lead to
      species extinction.
      I live far from my native Philippines and I doubt if our farmers there know
      that converting forests into cash crop land is leading to the extinction of
      many indigenous and even endemic species.

      Happy New Year and hope it brings us the awareness we have our destiny in
      our hands.

      RUTHIE

      2011/12/30 Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>

      > **
      >
      >
      > Thanks Daniel for this information. Never new that over grazing produced
      > deserts. Will have to read more about this and Jared Diamond.
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > Nandan
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Daniel <dfjager@...>
      > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, December 29, 2011 2:35 AM
      > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: NF experiences
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > This may be very hard to swallow for a great many: But it is livestock
      > that destroyed the Arab peninsula thousands of years ago, it is livestock
      > that destroyed northern Africa and it is livestock today that is destroying
      > eastern Africa. All these areas had, in the past, abundant growth, trees
      > and also rainfall.
      >
      > All livestock introductions follow the same pattern. Cows and horses are
      > brought in first. They eat all the grass. Forests are cut down, or burnt to
      > make more pastures for grazing. As the soil dries out and becomes poorer,
      > sheep replace the cows, and as the sheep devastate the land further (they
      > eat young tree saplings), the land becomes even drier until there is so
      > little fertility left that only goats can be kept.
      > Jared Diamond wrote a lot about this classic decline of land fertility
      > after livestock introductions.
      >
      > The problem is very persistent since in most of the areas I mentioned a
      > man's "worth" is measured by the size of his flock, not be the state of his
      > orchards. So it is the cultural traditions and our ego that make it all
      > just incredibly difficult to change.
      >
      > India's saving graze is the Indian ocean monsoon; otherwise much of it
      > would likely have been desert long ago.
      >
      > Daniel
      >
      >  --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "greenie6666" <normbeee@...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > I agree with Nandan, in NF most of anything grown must be returned to
      > the soil, to continue the fertility & to continue to improve it. Fukuoko
      > would only harvest the grain, all other vegetation should be returned to
      > the area.
      > > If the straw is cut or removed eventually the soil will be depleted of
      > it's fertility. Or as Nandan says, it's energy as everything is energy.
      > > I know the cow is sacred in India, but when I have visited there I often
      > wonder how any crops can be grown, with so many stray livestock, cows,
      > sheep & goats. I know the problem is that fencing is very expensive.
      > > So if livestock are allowed to graze an area, the manure should be
      > returned, otherwise over time things will go backwards & the soils
      > fertility will suffer.
      > > ..regards...Norm Australia.
      > >
      > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Harish Amur <harishamur@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > There are only a few of them. The grass in our farm grows rampantly.
      > We are
      > > > not worried about over grazing.
      > > >
      > > > "Energy lost" - I did not understand this part of your comment. How do
      > you
      > > > relate this to fertility of the soil? How do you compare the grazing to
      > > > harvesting? We lose energy in a harvest
      > > >
      > > > On Fri, Dec 23, 2011 at 8:39 PM, Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@
      > > > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > **
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi Harish,
      > > > >
      > > > > Won't the fertility of soil reduce if the cattle graze your farm?
      > > > > Otherwise you should put back the cow dung and urine back to the
      > soil, but
      > > > > still there is some energy lost.
      > > > >
      > > > > I was planning to have some cows so that fertility from one area can
      > be
      > > > > moved to other. It is all my thinking, may not be 100% true.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Regards,
      > > > >
      > > > > Nandan
      > > > >
      > > > > ________________________________
      > > > > From: Harish Amur <harishamur@>
      > > > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > Sent: Thursday, December 22, 2011 10:12 PM
      > > > >
      > > > > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] NF experiences
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > I was trying to emphasize on the issues a NF farmer has, when his
      > > > > neighbours are not educated about NF. I do not have any issue with
      > cattle,
      > > > > I believe they should eat as much grass as possible. And most cattle
      > > > > restrict their grazing to a field the supervisor wants them to be
      > in. It is
      > > > > more of the supervisor problem.
      > > > >
      > > > > Boovarahan, I am not sure how we can identify the failed seeds even
      > if we
      > > > > made seed balls. It is also quite difficult to make seed balls of
      > certain
      > > > > grains - for ex. mustard.
      > > > >
      > > > > The additional challenge is to locate your crop within the weeds
      > (till such
      > > > > time weeds grow in your NF farm). I am afraid to step into my NF
      > plot that
      > > > > has chickpea, mung etc as I may kill a good plant. Only when they
      > would
      > > > > have grown to a size that makes them easily identifiable, I would
      > venture
      > > > > into this plot.
      > > > >
      > > > > We got some jaggery made out of some of the sugar cane that has been
      > > > > growing in our farm. This is the first time that we are getting
      > jaggery
      > > > > made, so all excited. Personally spent some time to ensure that no
      > chemical
      > > > > was used while it was being made. Not sure how many of the
      > non-Indian folks
      > > > > understand 'jaggery'.
      > > > >
      > > > > On Thu, Dec 22, 2011 at 7:33 PM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@
      > > > > >wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > > **
      > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Hi Nandan !
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Fukuoka used seed balls which had just one or two seeds in a ball
      > and the
      > > > > > seed ball density was just right.
      > > > > > This may not be possible with direct scattering of seeds.
      > > > > > You can have a rope marker and just drop a couple of seeds at
      > regular
      > > > > > intervals of , say , one foot.
      > > > > > This may be a good alternative to indiscriminate scattering of
      > seeds.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > On Thu, Dec 22, 2011 at 4:48 PM, Nandan Palaparambil <
      > > > > > p_k_nandanan@
      > > > > > > wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > > **
      > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Hi Harish,
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Some people around my farm make a living by keeping cows. So
      > they are
      > > > > > > depending on the nearby farms. As long as the economic
      > differences
      > > > > exists
      > > > > > > these issues are going to be there. I keep on telling them and
      > they
      > > > > will
      > > > > > > hear for some time, again bring the cattles, so it is an ever
      > ending
      > > > > > > circle. Finally I may have to put a wire fencing to avoid this,
      > which I
      > > > > > > wanted avoid.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > This time for my rice, I ended up in sowing more and rice plants
      > came
      > > > > > very
      > > > > > > thickly, initially I was happy that it could crowd out weeds, but
      > > > > later I
      > > > > > > found that rice plants are competing each other and does not
      > become
      > > > > > strong
      > > > > > > plants. So it looks like broadcasting with right density is
      > little
      > > > > > tricky.
      > > > > > > Also finding out how every place is sown also is difficult since
      > we are
      > > > > > > broadcasting above the grass.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Fukuoka san's video shows him broadcasting seeds here and there
      > but it
      > > > > > all
      > > > > > > works out for him well.May be because of seed balls, germination
      > is
      > > > > > better
      > > > > > > and predictable.
      > > > > > >
      >  > > > > > Regards,
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Nandan
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > > Boovarahan S
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > Chennai.
      > > > > > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > >
      > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >

      >

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