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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Interesting

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  • Jason Stewart
    A direct quotation for absolute clearness, first. Commercial Agriculture Will Fail When the concept of commercial agriculture first appeared, I opposed it.
    Message 1 of 52 , Jan 26, 2012
      A direct quotation for absolute clearness, first.

      "
      Commercial Agriculture Will Fail

      When the concept of commercial agriculture first appeared, I opposed it. Commercial agriculture in Japan is not profitable for the farmer. Among merchants the rule is that if an article which originally costs a certain amount is

      further processed, an extra cost is added when the article is sold. But in Japanese agriculture it is not so straightforward. Fertilizer, feed, equipment, and chemicals

      are purchased at prices fixed abroad, and there is no telling what the actual cost per pound will be when these imported products are used. It is completely up to the merchants.

      And with selling prices also fixed, the farmer's income is at the mercy of forces beyond his control.

      In general, commercial agriculture is an unstable proposition. The farmer would do much better by growing the food he needs without thinking about making money. If you plant one grain of rice, it becomes more than one thousand grains. One row of turnips makes enough pickles for the entire winter. If you follow this line of thought, you will have enough to eat, more than enough, without struggling. But if you decide to try to make money instead, you get on board the profit wagon, and it runs away with you.

      I have been thinking lately about white leghorns. Because the improved variety of white leghorn lays over 200 days a year, raising them for profit is considered good business. When raised commercially these chickens are cooped up in long rows of small cages not unlike cells in a penitentiary, and through their entire lives their feet are never allowed to touch the ground. Disease is common and the birds are pumped full of antibiotics and fed a formula diet of vitamins and hormones.

      It is said that the local chickens that have been kept since ancient times, the brown and black shamo and chabo, have only half the egg-laying capacity. As a result these birds have all but disappeared in Japan. I let two hens and one rooster loose to run wild on the mountainside and after one year there were twenty-four. When it seemed that few eggs were being laid, the local birds were busy raising chickens.

      In the first year, the leghorn has a greater egg-laying efficiency than the local chickens, but after one year the white leghorn is exhausted and cast aside, whereas the shamo we started with has become ten healthy birds running about beneath the orchard trees. Furthermore, the white leghorns lay well because they are raised on

      artificially enriched feed which is imported from foreign countries and must be bought from the merchants. The

      local birds scratch around and feed freely on seeds and insects in the area and lay delicious, natural eggs.


      Setting out for a day's work.

      If you think commercial vegetables are nature's own, you are in for a big surprise. These vegetables are a watery chemical concoction of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potash, with a little help from the seed. And that is just how they taste. And commercial chicken eggs (you can call them eggs if you like) are nothing more than a mixture of synthetic feed, chemicals, and hormones. This is not a product of nature but a man made synthetic in the shape of an egg. The farmer who produces vegetables and eggs of this kind, I call a manufacturer.

      Now if it is manufacturing you are talking about, you will have to do some fancy figuring if you want to make a profit. Since the commercial farmer is not making any money, he is like a merchant who cannot handle the abacus. That sort of fellow is regarded as a fool by other people and his profits are soaked up by politicians and salesmen.

      In olden times there were warriors, farmers, craftsmen, and merchants. Agriculture was said to be closer to the source of things than trade or manufacturing, and the farmer was said to be "the cupbearer of the gods." He was always able to get by somehow or other and have enough to eat.

      But now there is all this commotion about making money. Ultra-fashionable produce such as grapes, tomatoes, and melons are being grown. Flowers and fruit are being produced out-of-season in hothouses. Fish breeding has been introduced and cattle are raised because profits are high.

      This pattern shows clearly what happens when farming climbs aboard the economic roller coaster.



      Fluctuations in prices are violent. There are profits, but there are losses as well.

      Failure is inevitable. Japanese agriculture has lost sight of its direction and has become unstable. It has strayed away from the basic principles of agriculture and

      has become a business.

      "


      I know late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei is correct about this.
      i knew he was right about this from my own independent sources of international information, before i had ever heard of and ever read late Fukuoka Masanobu sensei.
      Do you need any convincing, there is mountains of incontrovertible evidence, in many forms, from boring scientific papers, to documentary films, lecture films, and movies.
      One single rebattal point is more than sufficient to put the perspective of evidenced reality interpretation and prognosis, instead of self-serving--interpretation and desiring more of the same, more of business as usual:
      All the more than a billion people, who today are undernourished, and the more than a billion people who will surely die, if business--as--usual destructive--extractive--ecocidal consumption continues for the motivation of money. When in the reality of our earth's current situation, only compassion for all can be the motivation sufficient to prevent this prognosis, rather than the religion of money---of the religion of one-up-man-ship money competition (which by itself as a motivation and world view, if that exists in any person, is not even a sufficient world-view and motivation for sanity, let alone for preventing the most unholy of future prognosies).
      In Oz (my vernacular for Australia) we say: Get real!


      Biggest best true nature with all,

      Mr. Jason Stewart.

      On 26/01/2012, at 1:11 PM, Anant Joglekar wrote:

      > Fukuoka expects every body growing for one self (family) and not for community at large or a group of so called CONSUMERS having specific unnatural demand as to taste, size, un timely availability and so on.
      >
      > Fukuoka has rightly said ' commercial agriculture will fail '
      >
      > When we grow for ourselves or say our family, even a single tree delivers plenty of fruits more than enough for us and so having a single tree each of different taste and different varieties for one self ( family) is in real terms called abundance.
      >
      >
      > anant joglekar
      > 9423089706
      >
      > The ultimate goal of natural farming is not simply growing crops but the cultivation and perfection of human beings. Masanobu Fukuoka
      >
      > >________________________________
      > > From: yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...>
      > >To: "fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com" <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      > >Sent: Wednesday, 25 January 2012 11:31 PM
      > >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Interesting Fw: The Promise Of Bio Char
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Hello Nandan,
      > >It is tree that trees grown from seed can also produce good fruit,I have grown up in a house with two such mango trees in front of it.But if you have a large number of trees in an orchard you will never get the same consistent quality of fruit that you will get from trees grafted from the same line of scion stock or from tissue culture saplings.Nowadays the market demands a certain uniformity and consistency which may not be healthy but is a reality.You will get better prices from wholesale traders if they know your produce is consistent in quality.There are many other reasons, like using of hardy root stock etc .
      > >It is not only fruiting, even the timber industry prefers tissue cultured trees to those grown from seed for the consisteny in quality of timber.
      > > Regards,
      > > Yaj.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >________________________________
      > >From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
      > >To: "fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com" <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      > >Sent: Monday, January 23, 2012 7:51 PM
      > >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Interesting Fw: The Promise Of Bio Char
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Yaj,
      > >
      > >There are some local varieties here which people does not graft, but still gives good quality fruits. For e.g there is a variety which is locally called as 'Moovandan' (three years) which gives fruits in 3 years and hence nurseries also sell mango saplings grown from seed. Another one is called ''Nattumavu' or 'Chandrakkaran' which also can be grown from seeds. I remember earlier only local variety mangoes were available and grafting was not much done. Now a days lot of exotic varieties from different region are coming and hence grafting is done heavily. Unfortunately demand is there for the exotic varieties brought from outside rather than the local varieties.
      > >
      > >Another point to note is that the two mentioned items rarely get any damaged fruits while ripe, especially 'Nattumavu'. Last season I never found any fruits with worms inside. These mangoes are extremely sweet when ripened on the tree itself. Typically people here uses pesticides like 'Endosulfan' (now banned), Karate etc against the fruit flies
      > >
      > >I invite all of you to my farm in Apri/May when there are plenty of mangoes available.
      > >
      > >Regards,
      > >Nandan
      > >
      > >________________________________
      > >From: yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...>
      > >To: "fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com" <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
      > >Sent: Monday, January 23, 2012 9:19 AM
      > >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Interesting Fw: The Promise Of Bio Char
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >________________________________
      > >From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
      > >
      > >Even I have planted some grafted mango trees, so not following 100% natural farming here since non grafted variety takes much longer to bear fruits.
      > >
      > >********* Most fruit trees for commercial production are grafted, because trees grown from seed are not predictable in their quality of fruit.
      > >Apparently grafting is a must in mango trees to get a consistent and reliable quality of fruit.
      > > Regards,
      > > Yaj.
      > >
      > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Yugandhar S
      Thanks Nandan for this inspiring video. Wow!! what a man he is. Such noble ideals. He is distributing the fruit of his labor for free. Comments on the video
      Message 52 of 52 , Feb 4, 2012
        Thanks Nandan for this inspiring video. Wow!! what a man he is. Such noble
        ideals. He is distributing the fruit of his labor for free. Comments on the
        video page talk about his financial troubles. Profits and ideals cannot go
        hand in hand.

        Best Regards
        Yugandhar

        On Fri, Jan 27, 2012 at 1:05 PM, Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...
        > wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > I am in the process of understanding the plant breeding techniques..Please
        > see the video of Prakash Raghuvanshi. Here he talks about the same thing as
        > Shashi told..new plants will be developed in every farmer's field, but he
        > identifies it and multiply the plant which has a different characteristics
        > and after some years, he will have a new breed.
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GKK1sCs0ps
        >
        > I wanted to understand how Fukuoka san evolved the happy hill rice.
        > Getting the happy hill seeds looks to be difficult from Japan, my friend
        > indicated that the post office does not allow to export seeds to other
        > countries without permission.
        >
        > Regards,
        > Nandan
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Shashi Kumar <kumar.shashi@...>
        > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Friday, January 27, 2012 8:28 AM
        >
        > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Interesting Fw: The Promise Of Bio Char
        >
        >
        >
        > If I can add --
        >
        > there is noting like local and indigenous verity. Nature (in this case
        > plants) always cross pollinates to device a better plant or a seed that can
        > survive local "agro climatic" situation and this is a continuous process.
        >
        > On Fri, Jan 27, 2012 at 8:13 AM, Nandan Palaparambil <
        > p_k_nandanan@...
        > > wrote:
        >
        > > But is it a sin to sell the natural farming products at a higher price?
        > > Considering the fact that all agriculture products are meagerly priced,
        > > compared to other services and products.
        > >
        > > Yaj - I was thinking that the local indigenous varieties never return
        > back
        > > to their wild ancestors. But I think this is not true for grains.
        > >
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > > Nandan
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...>
        > > To: "fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com" <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 7:01 PM
        > > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Interesting Fw: The Promise Of Bio Char
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I agree with Joglekarji that this a topic which needs much discussion.
        > > Selling surplus produce for a profit/additional income should not be
        > > treated like it is a sin.It is the natural human tendency to to try and
        > > improve one's financial condition,to be able to provide more for one's
        > > loved ones and have financial security for them.
        > > If natural farming is going to provide only enough to get by and lead a
        > > relatively Spartan existence it will remain a fringe movement with very
        > few
        > > takers.
        > > Thankfully there are quite a few practitioners who have demonstrated
        > > that if taken on as a full time endeavour it can not only be profitable
        > but
        > > can provide a decent income. I for one got the confidence to take this
        > path
        > > only after these examples.
        > > I like my material pleasures and have no desire to live an austere
        > spartan
        > > existence. I truly believe that natural farming can generate a decent
        > > income if one devotes our full attention to it and one has a hands on
        > > approach. And I t believe that we can attract more people to natural
        > > farming only if we can demonstrate this.
        > >
        > > PS: Nandan, bananas are propagated vegetatively/asexually so are not
        > > comparable to fruit trees grown from seeds.Fruits grown from seed can
        > > often return back to characteristics of their wild ancestors and the
        > taste
        > > can be poor and undesirable.For trees planted even in scales of 100-200
        > > trees grading and assessing cost of fruit will be very difficult if there
        > > is wide variation in quality and taste of fruit.Here the case of
        > "natural"
        > > tastes better does not necessarily hold true.Any way all these varieties
        > > have been carefully selectively reproduced and created over centuries or
        > > more(yes even the local indigenous ones). The wild ancestors of most
        > modern
        > > fruits and vegetables are barely edible.
        > > Truly wild varieties of mango are said to have a unpleasant phenolic
        > > taste.
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > >
        > > Yaj.
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


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