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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Interesting Fw: The Promise Of Bio Char

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  • Raju Titus
    I am growing trees, (Subabul) trimming small branches on top for fodder leaf, these branches if remain on ground is better but not possible because farmers
    Message 1 of 52 , Jan 26, 2012
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      I am growing trees, (Subabul) trimming small branches on top for fodder
      leaf, these branches if remain on ground is better but not possible because
      farmers nearby steal and burn because they burn straws of crops. Some of
      small branches+dry leaf+ dung and urine of animal go back. I am keeping
      balance so growth will not go down. Therefore i am selling it in half price
      to poor people. They are happy because are not getting fire wood easily
      grain is easily available but fire wood is problem.
      I saw in Ymunanager Hariyana farmers are growing Populer tree
      for plywood with crops but using tilling,chemicals. They cut trees from
      bottom and remove roots is not good.
      This is true if surplus we can sale things in market in low price
      because our input is also low.
      But what i realize that growing crops with trees is better than without
      trees. Farmers those growing Populer are happy with profit, City also
      improved. If they grow naturally the can save 80% in put easily.Cost of
      tilling and using chemical fertilizer is use less.
      Raju
      On Thu, Jan 26, 2012 at 5:48 PM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > There is no sin attached to selling excess produce but growing trees
      > exclusively for commercial purpose is debatable. When desire for money is
      > involved , all other sins come together one by one.
      > And most of the sellers are not producers but just middlemen who loot the
      > innocent farmers.
      >
      >
      > On Thu, Jan 26, 2012 at 9:18 AM, yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > Did not Fukuoka san himself sell his mandarin oranges commercially? If we
      > > limit "natural farming" to growing for oneself,family and friends,what
      > > about the millions of farmers and horticulturists who depend on selling
      > > their produce for a living? Are you saying natural farming is not a
      > viable
      > > alternative for them?
      > >
      > > Regards,
      > >
      > > Yaj.
      > >
      >
      > > Boovarahan S
      > >
      > Chennai.
      > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Raju Titus. Hoshangabad. 461001.India.
      +919179738049.
      http://picasaweb.google.com/rajuktitus
      fukuoka_farming yahoogroup
      http://rishikheti.blogspot.com/


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Yugandhar S
      Thanks Nandan for this inspiring video. Wow!! what a man he is. Such noble ideals. He is distributing the fruit of his labor for free. Comments on the video
      Message 52 of 52 , Feb 4, 2012
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        Thanks Nandan for this inspiring video. Wow!! what a man he is. Such noble
        ideals. He is distributing the fruit of his labor for free. Comments on the
        video page talk about his financial troubles. Profits and ideals cannot go
        hand in hand.

        Best Regards
        Yugandhar

        On Fri, Jan 27, 2012 at 1:05 PM, Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...
        > wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > I am in the process of understanding the plant breeding techniques..Please
        > see the video of Prakash Raghuvanshi. Here he talks about the same thing as
        > Shashi told..new plants will be developed in every farmer's field, but he
        > identifies it and multiply the plant which has a different characteristics
        > and after some years, he will have a new breed.
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GKK1sCs0ps
        >
        > I wanted to understand how Fukuoka san evolved the happy hill rice.
        > Getting the happy hill seeds looks to be difficult from Japan, my friend
        > indicated that the post office does not allow to export seeds to other
        > countries without permission.
        >
        > Regards,
        > Nandan
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Shashi Kumar <kumar.shashi@...>
        > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Friday, January 27, 2012 8:28 AM
        >
        > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Interesting Fw: The Promise Of Bio Char
        >
        >
        >
        > If I can add --
        >
        > there is noting like local and indigenous verity. Nature (in this case
        > plants) always cross pollinates to device a better plant or a seed that can
        > survive local "agro climatic" situation and this is a continuous process.
        >
        > On Fri, Jan 27, 2012 at 8:13 AM, Nandan Palaparambil <
        > p_k_nandanan@...
        > > wrote:
        >
        > > But is it a sin to sell the natural farming products at a higher price?
        > > Considering the fact that all agriculture products are meagerly priced,
        > > compared to other services and products.
        > >
        > > Yaj - I was thinking that the local indigenous varieties never return
        > back
        > > to their wild ancestors. But I think this is not true for grains.
        > >
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > > Nandan
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...>
        > > To: "fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com" <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2012 7:01 PM
        > > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Interesting Fw: The Promise Of Bio Char
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I agree with Joglekarji that this a topic which needs much discussion.
        > > Selling surplus produce for a profit/additional income should not be
        > > treated like it is a sin.It is the natural human tendency to to try and
        > > improve one's financial condition,to be able to provide more for one's
        > > loved ones and have financial security for them.
        > > If natural farming is going to provide only enough to get by and lead a
        > > relatively Spartan existence it will remain a fringe movement with very
        > few
        > > takers.
        > > Thankfully there are quite a few practitioners who have demonstrated
        > > that if taken on as a full time endeavour it can not only be profitable
        > but
        > > can provide a decent income. I for one got the confidence to take this
        > path
        > > only after these examples.
        > > I like my material pleasures and have no desire to live an austere
        > spartan
        > > existence. I truly believe that natural farming can generate a decent
        > > income if one devotes our full attention to it and one has a hands on
        > > approach. And I t believe that we can attract more people to natural
        > > farming only if we can demonstrate this.
        > >
        > > PS: Nandan, bananas are propagated vegetatively/asexually so are not
        > > comparable to fruit trees grown from seeds.Fruits grown from seed can
        > > often return back to characteristics of their wild ancestors and the
        > taste
        > > can be poor and undesirable.For trees planted even in scales of 100-200
        > > trees grading and assessing cost of fruit will be very difficult if there
        > > is wide variation in quality and taste of fruit.Here the case of
        > "natural"
        > > tastes better does not necessarily hold true.Any way all these varieties
        > > have been carefully selectively reproduced and created over centuries or
        > > more(yes even the local indigenous ones). The wild ancestors of most
        > modern
        > > fruits and vegetables are barely edible.
        > > Truly wild varieties of mango are said to have a unpleasant phenolic
        > > taste.
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > >
        > > Yaj.
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


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