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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Ruth

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  • Justin .
    Hello all. I remember that someone mentioned an old woman called Ruth, who had previously been a contributer on this list. Concern was expressed at her absence
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 19, 2002
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      Hello all.
      I remember that someone mentioned an old woman called Ruth, who had
      previously been a contributer on this list. Concern was expressed at her
      absence of posts.
      I have just returned from the UK annual Permaculture meeting. I have seen a
      book there by Ruth Stout, and she was described to me as an old lovely
      woman, from Australia who went to live in America. She was apparently the
      first "no-dig" gardener (that's what he said.) She seems to fit the same
      lovely description, though that was before I was on the list, and I haven't
      read those posts.Ruth Stout .... oh, I have just had a closer look at this
      book (Gardening Without Work, by Ruth Stout. What I was going to say was
      that Ruth died a year or so ago. So that was what I was going to tell you
      all. That is in fact what I was told today, by that man. But now I read on
      the back of the book that she died actually in 1980. Now I question myself
      whether the nice old woman you were taking about was even called Ruth or
      not!
      Okay, so that's my news - sorry so jumbled. The meeting was cool. More
      tomorrow but we only went for the day. Lots of great projects going on.
      Great ideas. Forest gardens, willow growing, all sorts.
      Bon nuit
      Justin.


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    • bobm20001
      Hi Justin, Larry Haftl mentioned that organic farmer and Ph.D Bargyla Rateaver - hasn t posted to this site for some time, and he was concerned for her because
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 19, 2002
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        Hi Justin,

        Larry Haftl mentioned that organic farmer and Ph.D Bargyla Rateaver -
        hasn't posted to this site for some time, and he was concerned for
        her because of her age. I recall two or three animated emails that
        Bargyla exchanged with me on several subjects, including how much
        third world peoples were willng to work to raise food and the Eden
        Project in Corwall, UK that seeks to put working replicas of the
        world's biomes on display under huge, ultra-modern geodesic-dome
        greenhouses. I, too miss Bargyla, and don't know if she is still
        tuned in to this site.

        She has a URL of her own advertising her writings:
        http://home.earthlink.net~brateaver/bbio.htm and many links under her
        own name on google.com. The last article I recall reading by her was
        published in "The Growing Edge" hydroponics magazine a few years ago;
        it concerned how to make compost tea.

        Ruth Stout, alas, is no longer with us. She was still promoting her
        deep mulch, no-dig gardening style at age 92, when she filmed the 23-
        minute video "Ruth Stout's Garden," available from both Jeavon's
        Bountiful Gardens and from the following website:
        http://www.earthlypursuits.com/Books/MulchGard.htm

        Bob Monie
        -- In fukuoka_farming@y..., "Justin ." <justinasia@h...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello all.
        > I remember that someone mentioned an old woman called Ruth, who had
        > previously been a contributer on this list. Concern was expressed
        at her
        > absence of posts.
        > I have just returned from the UK annual Permaculture meeting. I
        have seen a
        > book there by Ruth Stout, and she was described to me as an old
        lovely
        > woman, from Australia who went to live in America. She was
        apparently the
        > first "no-dig" gardener (that's what he said.) She seems to fit the
        same
        > lovely description, though that was before I was on the list, and I
        haven't
        > read those posts.Ruth Stout .... oh, I have just had a closer look
        at this
        > book (Gardening Without Work, by Ruth Stout. What I was going to
        say was
        > that Ruth died a year or so ago. So that was what I was going to
        tell you
        > all. That is in fact what I was told today, by that man. But now I
        read on
        > the back of the book that she died actually in 1980. Now I question
        myself
        > whether the nice old woman you were taking about was even called
        Ruth or
        > not!
        > Okay, so that's my news - sorry so jumbled. The meeting was cool.
        More
        > tomorrow but we only went for the day. Lots of great projects going
        on.
        > Great ideas. Forest gardens, willow growing, all sorts.
        > Bon nuit
        > Justin.
        >
        >
        > _________________________________________________________________
        > Internet access plans that fit your lifestyle -- join MSN.
        > http://resourcecenter.msn.com/access/plans/default.asp
      • LESLIEANDMARC@aol.com
        Please unsubscribe me--- [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 19, 2002
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          Please unsubscribe me---


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • bobm20001
          Hi Again Justin, Just a postscript: Ruth Stout, of course, was never a member of this list; she died long before it was created. She certainly did a great deal
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 20, 2002
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            Hi Again Justin,

            Just a postscript: Ruth Stout, of course, was never a member of this
            list; she died long before it was created. She certainly did a great
            deal to popularize no dig, deep mulch gardening even before Fukuoka's
            writings were available. Unlike Fukuoka's out of print books, her
            books often sell for reasonable prices on the used book market, and
            some of them are coming back into print in the US. I don't know if
            she and Fukuoka ever met, but they seem to have made their
            discoveries independently. Certainly, they were kindred spirits.

            Bargyla Rateaver has always been concerned with building up the
            fertility of the soil by an array of traditional organic methods,
            including compost and compost tea. But her membership in this list
            shows that she was exploring natural farming too.

            Would you tell us what you learned about forest farming, guilds, and
            so on at the permaculture meeting? Was there any talk of natural
            approaches?

            Bob Monie
            --- In fukuoka_farming@y..., "Justin ." <justinasia@h...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello all.
            > I remember that someone mentioned an old woman called Ruth, who had
            > previously been a contributer on this list. Concern was expressed
            at her
            > absence of posts.
            > I have just returned from the UK annual Permaculture meeting. I
            have seen a
            > book there by Ruth Stout, and she was described to me as an old
            lovely
            > woman, from Australia who went to live in America. She was
            apparently the
            > first "no-dig" gardener (that's what he said.) She seems to fit the
            same
            > lovely description, though that was before I was on the list, and I
            haven't
            > read those posts.Ruth Stout .... oh, I have just had a closer look
            at this
            > book (Gardening Without Work, by Ruth Stout. What I was going to
            say was
            > that Ruth died a year or so ago. So that was what I was going to
            tell you
            > all. That is in fact what I was told today, by that man. But now I
            read on
            > the back of the book that she died actually in 1980. Now I question
            myself
            > whether the nice old woman you were taking about was even called
            Ruth or
            > not!
            > Okay, so that's my news - sorry so jumbled. The meeting was cool.
            More
            > tomorrow but we only went for the day. Lots of great projects going
            on.
            > Great ideas. Forest gardens, willow growing, all sorts.
            > Bon nuit
            > Justin.
            >
            >
            > _________________________________________________________________
            > Internet access plans that fit your lifestyle -- join MSN.
            > http://resourcecenter.msn.com/access/plans/default.asp
          • Justin .
            Well, I wasn t there for long, so I haven t got much to report, and remember that I m new to all this. Aside from that: it seems that most of the permaculture
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 21, 2002
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              Well, I wasn't there for long, so I haven't got much to report, and
              remember that I'm new to all this. Aside from that: it seems that most of
              the permaculture people are into forest gardens. For example, if they have
              enough land there might be one or more parts turned into forest gardens. But
              not all. Robert Hart was an Englishman, so he is popular here. I gather that
              even he kept some land for the sun-loving plants - I don't think you get
              much vegetables from a forest garden alone. There was a woman there who had
              been a friend of Robert's, and had his library there for people to see,
              which had been left to her. She says the people now on Robert's land are not
              friendly and the garden is left to become what it may - another unfortunate
              end.
              One woman told me that some of the fruits from a forest garden taste
              horrible! I would guess that it might be a case of educating the palate, and
              perhaps digging up old traditional recipies for these long disused foods.
              I questioned one woman about whether permaculture people plough or not. She
              told me that they don't, which surprised me. I was under the impression that
              it was only a select few that are Fukuokian in that respect. But she says
              no, everyone tries not to plough, not to disturb the earth. I questioned,
              "they Never plough?" 'oh, well Sometimes!" It seems that they (well, I
              suppose the ones she knows) plough now and again, only when they "have to",
              whatever that means.
              But they are really cool people, and I think close to Fukouka. Perhaps I am
              wrong but it seems to me that Fukuoka was a little anti-Fukuoka? Didn't he
              speak out against their "mixing" of techniques, and how it should be totally
              "pure". But I think that these guys, for example, really try to learn from
              nature. They really try to observe what grows around them, and what is
              appropriate. I my feeling is that that is a key also for Fukuoka. They are
              also concerned with society, and how we interact. And how we live - what
              impact our lifestyle has on society and so on. So it is a whole
              philosophical thing too. Like Fukuoka says, we transform ourselves - another
              key.
              Guilds? I heard about some coppicers teaming together. Working forests
              sustainably sounds really very interesting to me. If I've got the guts I
              will cyle to see a guy called Ben Law (you'll find him on Amazon) to find
              out more about that. I suppose that is even more "natural" farming than even
              Fukuoka or Hart! Of course, coppicing doesn't work everywhere, but it is
              great here. Ah, another thing. A guy up in Scotland has a nice amount of
              land, and started doing this permaculture stuff. He also makes baskets and
              that sort of thing. At that time all those kind of craftsmen had to get
              there willow sent from Devon, right down in the south west of England. When
              he started planting willow on his land up in Scotland, the neighbors thought
              he was mad. They all know you can't grow willow up there!
              Now several other people also grow willow in Scotland.
              Well that's all I have to report.
              Justin.


              >
              >Hi Again Justin,
              >
              >Just a postscript: Ruth Stout, of course, was never a member of this
              >list; she died long before it was created. She certainly did a great
              >deal to popularize no dig, deep mulch gardening even before Fukuoka's
              >writings were available. Unlike Fukuoka's out of print books, her
              >books often sell for reasonable prices on the used book market, and
              >some of them are coming back into print in the US. I don't know if
              >she and Fukuoka ever met, but they seem to have made their
              >discoveries independently. Certainly, they were kindred spirits.
              >
              >Bargyla Rateaver has always been concerned with building up the
              >fertility of the soil by an array of traditional organic methods,
              >including compost and compost tea. But her membership in this list
              >shows that she was exploring natural farming too.
              >
              >Would you tell us what you learned about forest farming, guilds, and
              >so on at the permaculture meeting? Was there any talk of natural
              >approaches?
              >
              >Bob Monie
              >--- In fukuoka_farming@y..., "Justin ." <justinasia@h...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hello all.
              > > I remember that someone mentioned an old woman called Ruth, who had
              > > previously been a contributer on this list. Concern was expressed
              >at her
              > > absence of posts.
              > > I have just returned from the UK annual Permaculture meeting. I
              >have seen a
              > > book there by Ruth Stout, and she was described to me as an old
              >lovely
              > > woman, from Australia who went to live in America. She was
              >apparently the
              > > first "no-dig" gardener (that's what he said.) She seems to fit the
              >same
              > > lovely description, though that was before I was on the list, and I
              >haven't
              > > read those posts.Ruth Stout .... oh, I have just had a closer look
              >at this
              > > book (Gardening Without Work, by Ruth Stout. What I was going to
              >say was
              > > that Ruth died a year or so ago. So that was what I was going to
              >tell you
              > > all. That is in fact what I was told today, by that man. But now I
              >read on
              > > the back of the book that she died actually in 1980. Now I question
              >myself
              > > whether the nice old woman you were taking about was even called
              >Ruth or
              > > not!
              > > Okay, so that's my news - sorry so jumbled. The meeting was cool.
              >More
              > > tomorrow but we only went for the day. Lots of great projects going
              >on.
              > > Great ideas. Forest gardens, willow growing, all sorts.
              > > Bon nuit
              > > Justin.
              > >
              > >
              > > _________________________________________________________________
              > > Internet access plans that fit your lifestyle -- join MSN.
              > > http://resourcecenter.msn.com/access/plans/default.asp
              >


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