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some thoughts on dharma

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  • Kaushik katari
    This is an interesting tangent, but definitely in the true spirit of Fukuoka san. In the Buddhist context, Dharma means the way things are . The root is
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 5, 2011
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      This is an interesting tangent, but definitely in the true spirit of
      Fukuoka san. In the Buddhist context, Dharma means the 'way things
      are'. The root is definitely Sanskrit, but in this specific context,
      the practice of Buddhism means observing the way things are, rather
      than the way we want (or do not want) them to be. The Buddha observes
      the Dharma.

      This is perhaps why 'Do Nothing' farming is simple, but not easy. It
      is not easy to still the mind and observe the nature of things as they
      really are. Our minds wander, between memories and anticipations. We
      rise and fall on the waves of victories and disappointments. But the
      nature, the Dharma, is independent of our mental images or our
      opinions.

      I feel that Fukuoka san is urging us to practice farming as much as a
      Buddhist monk practices meditation, to be able to observe Dharma. It
      is broad, and so you cannot observe a pest or a weed in isolation. You
      cannot target your energy to grow a crop and kill the weed. The
      observation requires mindfulness, and energy.

      I hope the rest of the group does not find this tangent too off topic.
      Ultimately, we hope that our noble intent transforms not just the
      soil, but our souls as well.
      --
      please note new phone number: 510-213-9867
    • Ruthie Aquino
      As part of the rest of the group I appreciate all explanations on Dharma, thank you. It somehow explains what I observed, that more Indians than Filipinos
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 6, 2011
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        As part of the rest of the group I appreciate all explanations on Dharma,
        thank you. It somehow explains what I observed, that more Indians than
        Filipinos understand Fukuoka farming. It is harder for a Filipino to
        comprehend it, in my humble opinion.

        best
        RUTHIE

        2011/11/5 Kaushik katari <katari@...>

        > **
        >
        >
        > This is an interesting tangent, but definitely in the true spirit of
        > Fukuoka san. In the Buddhist context, Dharma means the 'way things
        > are'. The root is definitely Sanskrit, but in this specific context,
        > the practice of Buddhism means observing the way things are, rather
        > than the way we want (or do not want) them to be. The Buddha observes
        > the Dharma.
        >
        > This is perhaps why 'Do Nothing' farming is simple, but not easy. It
        > is not easy to still the mind and observe the nature of things as they
        > really are. Our minds wander, between memories and anticipations. We
        > rise and fall on the waves of victories and disappointments. But the
        > nature, the Dharma, is independent of our mental images or our
        > opinions.
        >
        > I feel that Fukuoka san is urging us to practice farming as much as a
        > Buddhist monk practices meditation, to be able to observe Dharma. It
        > is broad, and so you cannot observe a pest or a weed in isolation. You
        > cannot target your energy to grow a crop and kill the weed. The
        > observation requires mindfulness, and energy.
        >
        > I hope the rest of the group does not find this tangent too off topic.
        > Ultimately, we hope that our noble intent transforms not just the
        > soil, but our souls as well.
        > --
        > please note new phone number: 510-213-9867
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Boovarahan Srinivasan
        Indian or Filipino doesn t matter .So long a person travels in search of real knowledge and nature , that person is bound to know nature and admire its beauty
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 6, 2011
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          Indian or Filipino doesn't matter .So long a person travels in search of
          real knowledge and nature , that person is bound to know nature and admire
          its beauty and power. This mindset is based on inquisitiveness and not on
          nationality or race.

          Just my thoughts .

          On Sun, Nov 6, 2011 at 4:37 PM, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...>wrote:

          > As part of the rest of the group I appreciate all explanations on Dharma,
          > thank you. It somehow explains what I observed, that more Indians than
          > Filipinos understand Fukuoka farming. It is harder for a Filipino to
          > comprehend it, in my humble opinion.
          >
          > best
          > RUTHIE
          >



          > Boovarahan S

          Chennai.
          09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Sumant Joshi
          wonderful thoughts!! Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone Warm regards, Sumant Joshi Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161 ... [Non-text portions of this message have
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 6, 2011
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            wonderful thoughts!!



            Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone


            Warm regards,

            Sumant Joshi
            Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161



            >________________________________
            >From: Kaushik katari <katari@...>
            >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            >Sent: Saturday, 5 November 2011 9:22 PM
            >Subject: [fukuoka_farming] some thoughts on dharma
            >
            >

            >This is an interesting tangent, but definitely in the true spirit of
            >Fukuoka san. In the Buddhist context, Dharma means the 'way things
            >are'. The root is definitely Sanskrit, but in this specific context,
            >the practice of Buddhism means observing the way things are, rather
            >than the way we want (or do not want) them to be. The Buddha observes
            >the Dharma.
            >
            >This is perhaps why 'Do Nothing' farming is simple, but not easy. It
            >is not easy to still the mind and observe the nature of things as they
            >really are. Our minds wander, between memories and anticipations. We
            >rise and fall on the waves of victories and disappointments. But the
            >nature, the Dharma, is independent of our mental images or our
            >opinions.
            >
            >I feel that Fukuoka san is urging us to practice farming as much as a
            >Buddhist monk practices meditation, to be able to observe Dharma. It
            >is broad, and so you cannot observe a pest or a weed in isolation. You
            >cannot target your energy to grow a crop and kill the weed. The
            >observation requires mindfulness, and energy.
            >
            >I hope the rest of the group does not find this tangent too off topic.
            >Ultimately, we hope that our noble intent transforms not just the
            >soil, but our souls as well.
            >--
            >please note new phone number: 510-213-9867
            >
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jason Stewart
            Marvellous, uplifting, wonderful thoughts, agreed. As you all may have seen i could write a lot more, way too much, more! More, much more is felt, more joy,
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 6, 2011
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              Marvellous, uplifting, wonderful thoughts, agreed.
              As you all may have seen i could write a lot more, way too much, more!
              More, much more is felt, more joy,
              with this tangent that's not a tangent at all.
              More than words can fully say.
              So, as so with the topic, Dharma: exceeding even of *all* the words conveying it, 100s of words, 1000s, millions of words, infinite words.
              In a second sense getting to an awareness exceeding of all words:
              Again, i say this following rhetorical Q, have said it before with many people here in Oz, such as in Sydney, and will say it again in conversation with many people in the future. The myriad varied responses we all have to this following Q, too, are all wonderful, too!
              Before the big�bang (in the sense of 'western' science). What?


              'biggest best true nature' to every person.
              Salut i have for you Ruthie, as a french word for your location there!

              Mr. Jason Stewart

              On 06/11/2011, at 9:07 PM, Sumant Joshi wrote:

              > wonderful thoughts!!
              >
              > Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone
              >
              > Warm regards,
              >
              > Sumant Joshi
              > Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161
              >
              > >________________________________
              > >From: Kaushik katari <katari@...>
              > >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
              > >Sent: Saturday, 5 November 2011 9:22 PM
              > >Subject: [fukuoka_farming] some thoughts on dharma
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >This is an interesting tangent, but definitely in the true spirit of
              > >Fukuoka san. In the Buddhist context, Dharma means the 'way things
              > >are'. The root is definitely Sanskrit, but in this specific context,
              > >the practice of Buddhism means observing the way things are, rather
              > >than the way we want (or do not want) them to be. The Buddha observes
              > >the Dharma.
              > >
              > >This is perhaps why 'Do Nothing' farming is simple, but not easy. It
              > >is not easy to still the mind and observe the nature of things as they
              > >really are. Our minds wander, between memories and anticipations. We
              > >rise and fall on the waves of victories and disappointments. But the
              > >nature, the Dharma, is independent of our mental images or our
              > >opinions.
              > >
              > >I feel that Fukuoka san is urging us to practice farming as much as a
              > >Buddhist monk practices meditation, to be able to observe Dharma. It
              > >is broad, and so you cannot observe a pest or a weed in isolation. You
              > >cannot target your energy to grow a crop and kill the weed. The
              > >observation requires mindfulness, and energy.
              > >
              > >I hope the rest of the group does not find this tangent too off topic.
              > >Ultimately, we hope that our noble intent transforms not just the
              > >soil, but our souls as well.
              > >--
              > >please note new phone number: 510-213-9867
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ruthie Aquino
              Maybe just maybe more Indians listen to nature than Filipinos. I would like to know Filipinos who are into Fukuoka farming, but where are they? I don t
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 7, 2011
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                Maybe just maybe more Indians listen to nature than Filipinos. I would
                like to know Filipinos who are into Fukuoka farming, but where are they? I
                don't know...I have the impression my fellowmen would be more reticent to
                go back to natural farming whereas this group has many Indian members.
                I am a member of Rarefruit Philippines and when I talk of natural farming
                they have the impression I am talking Greek...Ooops sorry Thanos, that's
                just an English expression hehe.

                Please if there is a Pinoy out there, speak up.

                best
                RUTHIE



                2011/11/6 Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>

                > **
                >
                >
                > Indian or Filipino doesn't matter .So long a person travels in search of
                > real knowledge and nature , that person is bound to know nature and admire
                > its beauty and power. This mindset is based on inquisitiveness and not on
                > nationality or race.
                >
                > Just my thoughts .
                >
                > On Sun, Nov 6, 2011 at 4:37 PM, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...>wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > > As part of the rest of the group I appreciate all explanations on Dharma,
                > > thank you. It somehow explains what I observed, that more Indians than
                > > Filipinos understand Fukuoka farming. It is harder for a Filipino to
                > > comprehend it, in my humble opinion.
                > >
                > > best
                > > RUTHIE
                > >
                >
                > > Boovarahan S
                >
                > Chennai.
                > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jason Stewart
                Sergio Monticola, member, or was, member here - awesome Catholic advocate! Sergio, if you re still here, G day from Australia - been a long time. search up in
                Message 7 of 12 , Nov 7, 2011
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                  Sergio Monticola, member, or was, member here - awesome Catholic advocate!

                  Sergio, if you're still here, G'day from Australia - been a long time.

                  search up in this group's big archives.


                  On 07/11/2011, at 7:28 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:

                  > Maybe just maybe more Indians listen to nature than Filipinos. I would
                  > like to know Filipinos who are into Fukuoka farming, but where are they? I
                  > don't know...I have the impression my fellowmen would be more reticent to
                  > go back to natural farming whereas this group has many Indian members.
                  > I am a member of Rarefruit Philippines and when I talk of natural farming
                  > they have the impression I am talking Greek...Ooops sorry Thanos, that's
                  > just an English expression hehe.
                  >
                  > Please if there is a Pinoy out there, speak up.
                  >
                  > best
                  > RUTHIE
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > 2011/11/6 Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
                  >
                  >> **
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Indian or Filipino doesn't matter .So long a person travels in search of
                  >> real knowledge and nature , that person is bound to know nature and admire
                  >> its beauty and power. This mindset is based on inquisitiveness and not on
                  >> nationality or race.
                  >>
                  >> Just my thoughts .
                • Jason Stewart
                  - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/natural_farming_in_the_philippines/ Dear Ruthie Can you tell us about this group? (above linked), please. i wouldn t join it,
                  Message 8 of 12 , Dec 8, 2011
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                    -> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/natural_farming_in_the_philippines/

                    Dear Ruthie

                    Can you tell us about this group? (above linked), please.
                    i wouldn't join it,
                    not living in the Philippines.
                    You could join,
                    if you're not already a member.


                    'best true nature' with all,

                    Mr. Jason Stewart.


                    On 07/11/2011, at 7:28 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:

                    > Maybe just maybe more Indians listen to nature than Filipinos. I would
                    > like to know Filipinos who are into Fukuoka farming, but where are they? I
                    > don't know...I have the impression my fellowmen would be more reticent to
                    > go back to natural farming whereas this group has many Indian members.
                    > I am a member of Rarefruit Philippines and when I talk of natural farming
                    > they have the impression I am talking Greek...Ooops sorry Thanos, that's
                    > just an English expression hehe.
                    >
                    > Please if there is a Pinoy out there, speak up.
                    >
                    > best
                    > RUTHIE
                  • Ruthie Aquino
                    Hi Jason, I joined the group in your link last year until shortly afterwards I started receiving ads in the email for viagra and I thought to myself there s
                    Message 9 of 12 , Dec 8, 2011
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                      Hi Jason,
                      I joined the group in your link last year until shortly afterwards I
                      started receiving ads in the email for viagra and I thought to myself
                      there's danger for my computer and so I left it hahaha.
                      Anyway... they do not talk of natural farming but of integrated farming.
                      They think they are doing natural farming but actually it is organic
                      farming.
                      It is hard for Filipinos to even grasp the concept of Fukuoka farming
                      because of the Philippines' specific history. It is the only nation in
                      Asia which has been Westernized since the 16th century. The oldest
                      university in Asia was founded in the Philippines in the 17th century.
                      There is a tradition of scholarship which somehow clashes with the
                      do-nothing and know-nothing of natural farming.
                      However permaculturists say there has been natural farming in the
                      Philippines long before the colonizers arrived on our beaches there.
                      There was slash-and-burn, food forests, and there are the wonderful rice
                      terraces in the north of the country carved by human hands out of the
                      mountains many centuries ago by head-hunting tribes that, barring the
                      tourism they have generated from their breath-taking rice terraces, still
                      live as their ancestors did.
                      If you go to the provinces you can still find people who eat perrenial
                      crops and not only modern annual vegetables. There are plants in the diet
                      you will never find in any book on Asian cooking. They gather wild honey.
                      They can build a whole house with a coconut tree and bamboos.
                      Some elderly folk still know traditional herbal medicine.
                      The water buffalo is still used to plough small fields.
                      It is a country of bounty with a generous Nature.
                      In Rare Fruit Society of the Philippines of which I am a member the most
                      outspoken ones are commercial fruit growers, which is why they mock me and
                      say I am biased. However since I have no macho issues I force myself to
                      understand their motives and so I just say they are chiding me. Until one
                      day surprizes started coming. Some members wrote me individually to say
                      they get my reasoning but that they do not join in in the discussions.
                      Others started actively defending organic farming. In a way maybe organic
                      can be considered a step towards natural because there is the consciousness
                      of the harm manufactured chemicals do to our health and environment.
                      You will be surprized, but the persons in that discussion group who are
                      the most apt at understanding natural farming are or have lived overseas,
                      like me.
                      I think Nature is too bountiful in the Philippines to even give it a
                      thought. It is those in the crowded cities there who are the poorest and
                      sometimes even the most miserable because they are deprived of the gratuity
                      of Nature's bounty. I have not seen misery in the provinces. Poverty yes
                      but not misery.
                      If your country is an archipelago consisting of 7,107 islands then
                      generalizations would be difficult to make, even farming-wise.
                      I have chosen one of those islands to spend my life a few years from now
                      and I chose that specific island because it is relatively untouched by
                      commercialism and there are still possibilities of true natural farming in
                      healthy soil and healthy surrounding seas.
                      So there you are Stewart-san I hope you have a few answers.
                      Have a nice day.
                      RUTHIE
                      2011/12/9 Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>

                      > **
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > -> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/natural_farming_in_the_philippines/
                      >
                      > Dear Ruthie
                      >
                      > Can you tell us about this group? (above linked), please.
                      > i wouldn't join it,
                      > not living in the Philippines.
                      > You could join,
                      > if you're not already a member.
                      >
                      > 'best true nature' with all,
                      >
                      > Mr. Jason Stewart.
                      >
                      > On 07/11/2011, at 7:28 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:
                      >
                      > > Maybe just maybe more Indians listen to nature than Filipinos. I would
                      > > like to know Filipinos who are into Fukuoka farming, but where are they?
                      > I
                      > > don't know...I have the impression my fellowmen would be more reticent to
                      > > go back to natural farming whereas this group has many Indian members.
                      > > I am a member of Rarefruit Philippines and when I talk of natural farming
                      > > they have the impression I am talking Greek...Ooops sorry Thanos, that's
                      > > just an English expression hehe.
                      > >
                      > > Please if there is a Pinoy out there, speak up.
                      > >
                      > > best
                      > > RUTHIE
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Jason Stewart
                      Thanks dear Ruthieさん A fine message of further natural introduction of your homeland and yourself. Later, when i have some spare time, i have more
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 9, 2011
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                        Thanks dear Ruthieさん

                        A fine message of further natural introduction of your homeland and yourself.

                        Later, when i have some spare time,
                        i have more references to add from late sensei Fukuoka Masanobu himself writing about:
                        the Philippines, about Mrs. Aveliw's nature farm there.

                        (I hope you have Japanese working now, Ruthie---this message has Unicode UTF-8 text encoding of Japanese, as well as English, characters.)

                        Writing in his English translation very limited edition self-published, meaning printed less than 100 copies for gifts, but not really a published book:
                        (Below first comes the original Japanese book, from which it was translated:)

                        * 1992 (Japanese)
                        ..わら一本の革命・総括編「神と自然と人の革命」 (wara ippon no kakumei・sōkatsuhen「kami to shizen to hito no kakumei」)
                        ..Title, a literal translation by me: [Straw: One--Strand's Revolution・Recapitulation 'Universal God/Spirit and Spontaneity/Nature and Humanity Revolution']
                        ..Self-published in 1992 Dec. by 自然樹園 (小心舎) (Shizen Juen (Shou Shin Sha), One of Fukuoka Masanobu's own self--publishing publisher--names)
                        ..230p 26×27cm,
                        ..out of print ISBN 978-4-938743-01-7.

                        .....* 1996 (English) very limited edition self published translation:
                        ......."The Ultimatium [sic]..." this should read as ...Ultimatum..., so therefore i change it to that:
                        ......."The Ultimatum of God Nature: The One-Straw Revolution: A Recapitulation"
                        .......--He, himself, commissioned English--retranslation and printing in this very limited edition, less than 100 copies.
                        .......Of course no ISBN.
                        .......Printed by the author hence the publisher name is, quote: "S h o u S h i n S h a (小心舎)".


                        His Japanese later complete revision, 2001 (& 2010), of that above book says in a caption in the Philippines 1998 section:

                        マグサイ農園のアベリュー夫人 アキノ大統の片腕となる婦人

                        My word--for--word literal translation attempt, of that caption:
                        マグサイ = Magsay[say (re: the family of or the property originally of Magsaysay that the award was named after)]
                        農園 = farm/garden/small farm/plantation
                        の = 's
                        アベリュー = Aveliew (spelling? Ruthie please can you help all with the correct spelling of this Philippino person's name?)
                        夫人 = wife/eg. Mrs.

                        アキノ = Aquino
                        大統 = President
                        の = 's
                        片腕 = right-hand-man
                        となる = amounting to
                        婦人 = lady

                        Literal translation something along the lines of:

                        Magsaysay farm (person)'s (wife) Mrs. Aviliew -- The lady of (the man), amounting to the right--hand--man of President Aquino.

                        Mrs. Aviliew: --the spelling? Ruthie, please can you help all with the correct spelling of this Philippino (official?) person's name?


                        'best true nature' with all,

                        Jason Stewartさん


                        On 09/12/2011, at 6:40 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:

                        [all snipped for ease of reading, refer to Ruthie's fine original message]



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Ruthie Aquino
                        Hi Jason, I would be more than willing to be of any assistance to spread Fukuoka-san s thoughts. Firstly if you have the English translation of that limited
                        Message 11 of 12 , Dec 9, 2011
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                          Hi Jason,

                          I would be more than willing to be of any assistance to spread
                          Fukuoka-san's thoughts.
                          Firstly if you have the English translation of that limited edition would
                          it be possible to share a scanned copy?
                          Secondly Fukuoka-san was given the Ramon Magsaysay Award in 1988 in the
                          Philippines.
                          Wikipedia lists the recipients of the award and if you click on Masanobu
                          Fukuoka there is a longish entry on him there. There are Indians there,
                          too.
                          Thirdly the name you mention may be mispelled, would it be Abelio, Avelio,
                          Abreu, Aurelio...? I cannot find any correspondence. There were two
                          Philippine presidents named Aquino, first the mother and the present one is
                          the son. Which one are we talking about in your query, I suppose the first
                          one? I need more clues, Sherlock Holmes of natural farming.

                          best
                          RUTHIE
                          2011/12/9 Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>

                          > **
                          >
                          >
                          > Thanks dear Ruthieさん
                          >
                          > A fine message of further natural introduction of your homeland and
                          > yourself.
                          >
                          > Later, when i have some spare time,
                          > i have more references to add from late sensei Fukuoka Masanobu himself
                          > writing about:
                          > the Philippines, about Mrs. Aveliw's nature farm there.
                          >
                          > (I hope you have Japanese working now, Ruthie---this message has Unicode
                          > UTF-8 text encoding of Japanese, as well as English, characters.)
                          >
                          > Writing in his English translation very limited edition self-published,
                          > meaning printed less than 100 copies for gifts, but not really a published
                          > book:
                          > (Below first comes the original Japanese book, from which it was
                          > translated:)
                          >
                          > * 1992 (Japanese)
                          > ..わら一本の革命・総括編「神と自然と人の革命」 (wara ippon no kakumei・sōkatsuhen「kami to shizen
                          > to hito no kakumei」)
                          > ..Title, a literal translation by me: [Straw: One--Strand's
                          > Revolution・Recapitulation 'Universal God/Spirit and Spontaneity/Nature and
                          > Humanity Revolution']
                          > ..Self-published in 1992 Dec. by 自然樹園 (小心舎) (Shizen Juen (Shou Shin Sha),
                          > One of Fukuoka Masanobu's own self--publishing publisher--names)
                          > ..230p 26×27cm,
                          > ..out of print ISBN 978-4-938743-01-7.
                          >
                          > .....* 1996 (English) very limited edition self published translation:
                          > ......."The Ultimatium [sic]..." this should read as ...Ultimatum..., so
                          > therefore i change it to that:
                          > ......."The Ultimatum of God Nature: The One-Straw Revolution: A
                          > Recapitulation"
                          > .......--He, himself, commissioned English--retranslation and printing in
                          > this very limited edition, less than 100 copies.
                          > .......Of course no ISBN.
                          > .......Printed by the author hence the publisher name is, quote: "S h o u
                          > S h i n S h a (小心舎)".
                          >
                          > His Japanese later complete revision, 2001 (& 2010), of that above book
                          > says in a caption in the Philippines 1998 section:
                          >
                          > マグサイ農園のアベリュー夫人 アキノ大統の片腕となる婦人
                          >
                          > My word--for--word literal translation attempt, of that caption:
                          > マグサイ = Magsay[say (re: the family of or the property originally of
                          > Magsaysay that the award was named after)]
                          > 農園 = farm/garden/small farm/plantation
                          > の = 's
                          > アベリュー = Aveliew (spelling? Ruthie please can you help all with the correct
                          > spelling of this Philippino person's name?)
                          > 夫人 = wife/eg. Mrs.
                          >
                          > アキノ = Aquino
                          > 大統 = President
                          > の = 's
                          > 片腕 = right-hand-man
                          > となる = amounting to
                          > 婦人 = lady
                          >
                          > Literal translation something along the lines of:
                          >
                          > Magsaysay farm (person)'s (wife) Mrs. Aviliew -- The lady of (the man),
                          > amounting to the right--hand--man of President Aquino.
                          >
                          > Mrs. Aviliew: --the spelling? Ruthie, please can you help all with the
                          > correct spelling of this Philippino (official?) person's name?
                          >
                          >
                          > 'best true nature' with all,
                          >
                          > Jason Stewartさん
                          >
                          > On 09/12/2011, at 6:40 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:
                          >
                          > [all snipped for ease of reading, refer to Ruthie's fine original message]
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Jason Stewart
                          Dear Ruthie, Are you the Sherlock Holmes of natural farming ? i m trying, sometimes obviously in vain with no expressions of interest, to disseminate
                          Message 12 of 12 , Dec 9, 2011
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                            Dear Ruthie,

                            Are you the "Sherlock Holmes of natural farming"? <smile>
                            i'm trying, sometimes obviously in vain with no expressions of interest, to disseminate the most appropriate and beneficial 'stuff'.

                            Late sensei Fukuoka Masanobu shares photographs of and writes that, he went back to Philippines in 1998, ten years later (after the 1988 Ramon Magsaysay award).

                            Mrs. Aveliw, a brief quotation from the very limited edition English translation:
                            "
                            ...
                            ... the natural farm of Miss MS. Aveliw, a woman working for the Magsaysay Foundation in the Philippines. She read my book, did research for ten years, and completed the farm in four years. She has truly created a paradise, where beneath an assortment of fruit trees such as banana, papaya, guava, and durian. there is a dense growth of coffee trees and green manure, orchids are blooming in profusion, and fish are swimming in ponds.
                            ...
                            "

                            Please, Ruthie, it would help if you can dig and/or enquire further, to clarify the correct spelling of the name of : "Mrs. Aveliw", Philippines, lady of man who amounted to the right--hand--man of President Aquino, around 1998 (i suppose). I guess the Ramon Magsaysay foundation would help with an enquiry from you, if you can't dig it up online. (i wish i had time to do everything but i don't of course.)

                            In the previous email, the photograph caption i quoted and translated the Japanese from, is under the heading for his *1998* Philippines visit.
                            So, as long as there's no error in that book page, i presume there's no error,
                            then the President Aquino he means may, may be the Aquino of or near that 1998 time.
                            It's funny, but in that books *1988* Philippines visit section the photographs of late sensei Fukuoka Masanobu and his wife Ayako, look very similar to the 1998 photos, hence i wonder if any publisher--copyeditor errors crept in, i presume no errors!


                            Just in case of any confusion, the original 1992 Japanese edition was not a limited edition, only the very limited English translation printing, not published edition, less than 100 copies total was a very limited edition.
                            The very limited English translation printing, is only the text translated, none of the diagrams, and none of the photographs, at all included; Intended as a translation only, for together with the original Japanese full book (1992) version---as if like an English translation appendix.

                            So Ruthie, for late sensei Fukuoka Masanobu's more than 950 photographs, many diagrams, calligraphy and paintings, reproductions, and his Japanese original text,

                            you would i think love and should obtain this publicly available book: ...,
                            from the publisher here, via Amazon Japan or other suitable (Japanese) retailer, or ordering via a Japanese bookshop or big bookshop, there in France:

                            -> http://www.shunjusha.co.jp/detail/isbn/978-4-393-74151-1/

                            2010 [2001] (Japanese)
                            わら一本の革命 総括編 —粘土団子の旅—
                            (transliteration of the above Japanese:) wara ippon no kakumei sōkatsuhen —nendo dango no tabi—
                            (literal translation of the above Japanese:) [Straw: One--Strand's Revolution: Recapitulation ---Clay seed--pellet's journey [around Earth]---])
                            Originally in 2001 May, self-published by him, in the name: 自然樹園 (小心舎) (Shizen Juen (Shou Shin Sha)) –one of his own self-publishing-publisher-names
                            More than 950 captioned photographs from his travels all around Earth and his farm, many reproduced drawings and diagrams, and a full book of text pages also
                            271p A4 30x21cm (?out of print? (--i presume so))
                            ISBN 978-4-938743-02-4
                            Re-published in 2010 April by Shunjūsha (春秋社) (major Japanese publisher)
                            272p A4
                            in print
                            ISBN 978-4-393-74151-1
                            → http://www.shunjusha.co.jp/detail/isbn/978-4-393-74151-1/

                            See also these Shunjusha pages of his additional Japanese books:
                            Searching Fukuoka Masanobu: → http://www.shunjusha.co.jp/search_result.php?keyword=%CA%A1%B2%AC%C0%B5%BF%AE&page=1
                            Writer page for Fukuoka Masanobu: → http://www.shunjusha.co.jp/writer/26453/
                            Series page for his books (as a series): → http://www.shunjusha.co.jp/series/24/
                            Home page: → http://www.shunjusha.co.jp/

                            Thanks, i know all about the Wikipedia page, and the contents of it, and the sources of that contents, ... . The page needs a helluva lot of work on the accuracy of its contents meanings---dodgy-pedia strikes again (an idiomatic English joke).


                            'best true nature' with all,

                            Jason Stewartさん


                            On 09/12/2011, at 11:03 PM, Ruthie Aquino wrote:

                            > Hi Jason,
                            >
                            > I would be more than willing to be of any assistance to spread
                            > Fukuoka-san's thoughts.
                            > Firstly if you have the English translation of that limited edition would
                            > it be possible to share a scanned copy?
                            > Secondly Fukuoka-san was given the Ramon Magsaysay Award in 1988 in the
                            > Philippines.
                            > Wikipedia lists the recipients of the award and if you click on Masanobu
                            > Fukuoka there is a longish entry on him there. There are Indians there,
                            > too.
                            > Thirdly the name you mention may be mispelled, would it be Abelio, Avelio,
                            > Abreu, Aurelio...? I cannot find any correspondence. There were two
                            > Philippine presidents named Aquino, first the mother and the present one is
                            > the son. Which one are we talking about in your query, I suppose the first
                            > one? I need more clues, Sherlock Holmes of natural farming.
                            >
                            > best
                            > RUTHIE
                            > 2011/12/9 Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
                            >
                            > > [all snipped for ease of reading, refer to original message]
                            >



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