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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: A nice link

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  • Ruthie Aquino
    Yes Kostas I see your point, absolutely. That is not natural farming if it involves hauling in and grinding. Fukuoka was opposed to composting so he threw back
    Message 1 of 23 , Aug 1, 2011
      Yes Kostas I see your point, absolutely.
      That is not natural farming if it involves hauling in and grinding.
      Fukuoka was opposed to composting so he threw back the uncut straw in his
      field. Still, he had to throw it in again, and I suppose if you have acres
      of fields then that involves some hauling. However it is not heavy rocks
      and heavy bags of rock powder. Hahaha I can picture you carrying those
      heavy rocks and grinding those stones and sweating ang fuming!
      Anyway I like your comments.
      See! They opened up discussions.
      We are all trying to do some Fukuoka farming, and we need one another to
      encourage and share experiences.
      best
      RUTHIE

      2011/8/2 KONSTANTINOS <karoubas@...>

      > **
      >
      >
      > Congratulations on the potatoes Ruthie, and I hope you have many more
      > victories in the future.
      >
      > Ruthie, central to the concept of natural farming is the process by which
      > we improve and enrich the soil. Fukuoka-San evolved on this issue - this is
      > evident in his books - while initially he even buried logs in the soil, and
      > used manure at the end he concluded that the best way to improve the land is
      > through the use of plants and trees (just like in a forest)- he was very
      > excited about the use of alfalfa and acacia trees - they are both nitrogen
      > fixers and provide plenty of organic matter. The use of plants and trees
      > also fits well with the concept of do nothing (or do the least and have the
      > maximum impact) - just scatter seeds and watch nature perform wonders.
      > Tossing potatoes on the ground and covering them with mulch is a lot closer
      > to nature than digging a garden, bring in manure or ground up stone and
      > hilling. What you did with the potatoes in simple and close to perfection -
      > you did the least work and had the maximum output - nature has perfected
      > this concept - its not easy for us to achieve.
      >
      > The concept of spending hours grinding stones or buying dust from some
      > place far away, to me is not very appealing, and I see it as the opposite of
      > natural farming.
      >
      > Kostas
      >
      >
      > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello Kostas,
      > > I was a bit like you, a bit surprized to hear of additives in this group
      > > useful though they be.
      > > However in one of his writings Fukuoka-san said he was sad a road was
      > built
      > > between his ricefield and his duck pens, because before that his ducks
      > could
      > > freely roam in his fields to pick the slugs and snails, and leave their
      > > droppings.
      > > In other words I think he was not fully opposed to some kind of help from
      > > nature.
      > > When we talk of farming here I understand we not only talk of rice or
      > grain
      > > farming. We also talk of fruit trees and vegetables and possibly
      > > ornamentals. Sepp Holzer uses heavy stones instead of stakes to help his
      > > young trees establish and take root. He says it works perfectly well. I
      > > also suppose there is some sort of erosion happening to the stones, and
      > > maybe that is the kind of stone dust that can be acceptable to natural
      > > farming.
      > > In some southeast Asian countries we also have naturally occuring lahar
      > > or the fine particles spewed by erupting volcanoes. They are reputed to
      > > improve soil conditon when applied properly, please don't ask me how
      > because
      > > I do not know. In European mines we have scories which are a by-product
      > of
      > > mining and it is also reputed to improve soil fertility. Those mines are
      > > mostly closed now of course but I heard of it at the time.
      > > What I'm trying to say is that the above link is interesting anyway, even
      > if
      > > we do not agree with what it says. It shows how capitalism can smother
      > what
      > > would otherwise be useful findings. Right now natural farming is
      > receiving
      > > blows from all over because in the long run it would kill many industries
      > > and markets. I'm not an anti-capitalist person, but what I don't like is
      > > the vouluntary dissimulation of information on the pretext that it
      > > threatens capitalistic intentions.
      > > The above link also reminds me of the article on the man who turned his
      > > rocky land into a forest after only a few years, by boring holes and
      > > pounding the rock finely before planting his seeds. This article could be
      > > the explanation to why his plan worked.
      > > Anyway I have an announcement to make. I planted a line of potatoes by
      > > dropping them on the ground and covering them with grass cuttings. Three
      > > months on I have nice, clean potatoes from plants that did not suffer
      > from
      > > insect attacks or diseases. It has suprized many a neighbor, and what
      > they
      > > thought was a crazy idea is now what everyone wants to try for next
      > season's
      > > cropping.
      > > Happy farming.
      > > RUTHIE
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > 2011/8/1 KONSTANTINOS <karoubas@...>
      > >
      > > > **
      >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Nice Link ? Close to natural farming ?
      > > >
      > > > I beg to differ - stone meals ?? - grinding stones ? sounds like some
      > sort
      > > > of punishment for criminal activity - its got nothing to do with " DO -
      > > > NOTHING FARMING", that we are practicing, thanks to the great
      > Fukuoka-San.
      > > >
      > > > Kostas
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Sumant Joshi <sumant_jo@>
      > > > wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Nice and informative site Linda, thanks for sharing
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Warm regards,
      > > > >
      > > > > Sumant Joshi
      > > > > Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > >________________________________
      > > > > >From: Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@>
      > > >
      > > > > >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > >Sent: Saturday, 30 July 2011 4:50 PM
      > > > > >Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] A nice link
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >�
      > > > > >Hensel's book Bread from Stones is out of print but can be obtained
      > > > from
      > > > > >www.soilandhealth.org which is a free digitalised library
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Cheers, Linda
      > > > > >
      > > > > >-----Original Message-----
      > > > > >From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > >[mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Boovarahan
      > > > Srinivasan
      > > > > >Sent: Saturday, 30 July 2011 12:03 AM
      > > > > >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > >Subject: [fukuoka_farming] A nice link
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Another theory close to natural farming but vehement opposer of
      > chemical
      > > > > >farming .
      > > > > >
      > > > > >http://rawsunboy.blogspot.com/2011/02/dr-julius-hensel.html
      > > > > >
      > > > > >And I have copied the content ( emphasis mine) for the benefit of
      > all.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >----------------------------------------------------------
      > > > > >----------------------------------------------------------
      > > > > >----------------------------------------------------------
      > > > > >---
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Dr. Julius Hensel was the greatest figure in the history of
      > agricultural
      > > > > >chemistry even if his powerful enemies, members of the octopus
      > chemical
      > > > > >fertilizer trust, have succeeded in suppressing his memory,
      > destroying
      > > > his
      > > > > >books and getting his Stone Meal fertilizer off the market. But
      > > > eventually
      > > > > >the truth comes to the fore, and its enemies are vanquished. Julius
      > > > Hensel's
      > > > > >pioneer work in opposing the use of chemicals in agriculture, a half
      > a
      > > > > >century later, found rebirth in the Organic Movement which has swept
      > > > through
      > > > > >the world. But Hensel is more modern than the most modern
      > agricultural
      > > > > >reformer, for he claimed, on the basis of theoretical chemical
      > > > > >considerations, and supported by practical tests, that his Stone
      > Meal
      > > > can
      > > > > >replace not only chemical fertilizers but all animal ones as well.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >It was the German agricultural chemist Liebig who first put forward
      > the
      > > > > >phosphorus-potash-nitrogen theory of chemical fertilization. This
      > false
      > > > > >doctrine Hensel bitterly attacked and in so doing, won the ire of
      > the
      > > > > >financial interests behind the sale of chemical fertilizers, which
      > used
      > > > > >agricultural authorities and university professors to denounce poor
      > > > Hensel
      > > > > >as a charlatan and his Stone Meal as worthless.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Though his fight against chemical fertilizers was a losing battle
      > and he
      > > > > >died as a defeated hero, it took a generation for Hensel's efforts
      > to
      > > > bear
      > > > > >fruit in the modern Organic Movement, which has not given its
      > founder
      > > > the
      > > > > >credit due him.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >The fight between Liebig, advocate [of] one-sided chemical
      > > > fertilization,
      > > > > >and Hensel, who advocated a more balanced form of plant nutrition,
      > > > including
      > > > > >the trace minerals which Liebig completely overlooked, was a battle
      > > > between
      > > > > >an opportunist, who sought to further the sales of chemical
      > fertilizers,
      > > > and
      > > > > >a true scientist, interested in humanity's welfare.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Though Liebig, with the Chemical Trust behind him, won the battle,
      > > > Hensel's
      > > > > >ideas finally triumphed... several decades after his passing.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Liebig claimed that plants require three main elements-nitrogen,
      > > > phosphorus
      > > > > >and potash-the basis of which conception chemical fertilizers were
      > > > > >manufactured that supplied these elements. On the other hand, Hensel
      > > > claimed
      > > > > >that plants need many more than these three major elements,
      > stressing
      > > > the
      > > > > >importance of the trace minerals, which at that time were ignored.
      > In
      > > > place
      > > > > >of chemical fertilizers, supplying only three elements in an
      > unnatural,
      > > > > >caustic form, Hensel recommended the bland minerals of pulverized
      > rocks,
      > > > > >especially granite, a primordial rock which contains the many trace
      > > > minerals
      > > > > >that meet all needs of plant nutrition.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Hensel first made his discovery of powdered rock fertilization when
      > he
      > > > was a
      > > > > >miller.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >One day, while milling grain, he noticed that some stones were mixed
      > > > with it
      > > > > >and [he] ground [them] into a meal. He sprinkled this stone meal
      > over
      > > > the
      > > > > >soil of his garden and was surprised to note how the vegetables took
      > on
      > > > a
      > > > > >new, more vigorous growth. This led him to repeat the experiment by
      > > > grinding
      > > > > >more stones and applying the stone meal to fruit trees. Much to his
      > > > > >surprise, apple trees that formerly bore wormy, imperfect fruit now
      > > > produced
      > > > > >fine quality fruit free from worms. Also vegetables fertilized by
      > stone
      > > > meal
      > > > > >were free from insect pests and diseases. It seemed to be a complete
      > > > plant
      > > > > >food, which produced fine vegetables even in the poorest soil.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Encouraged by these results, Hensel put his "Stone Meal" on the
      > market,
      > > > and
      > > > > >wrote extensively on its superiority over chemical fertilizers,
      > while at
      > > > the
      > > > > >same time opposing the use of animal manure, and the nitrogen theory
      > on
      > > > > >which it is based, claiming that when plants are supplied with Stone
      > > > Meal,
      > > > > >plenty of water, air and sunshine, they will grow health-fully even
      > if
      > > > the
      > > > > >soil is poor in nitrogen, since it was his belief that plants derive
      > > > their
      > > > > >nitrogen through their leaves, and do not depend on the soil for
      > this
      > > > > >element.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >In opposing this use of chemical fertilizer, Hensel awoke the ire of
      > a
      > > > > >powerful enemy, which was resolved to liquidate him-the Chemical
      > Trust.
      > > > > >Through unfair competition, Hensel's "Stone Meal" business was
      > destroyed
      > > > and
      > > > > >his product was taken off the market. However, the chief object of
      > > > attack
      > > > > >was his book, Bread From Stones, in which he expounded his new
      > doctrines
      > > > of
      > > > > >Liebig on which the chemical fertilizer business was based, as well
      > as
      > > > the
      > > > > >"Liebig meat extract." (For Hensel advocated vegetarianism, just as
      > he
      > > > > >advocated natural farming without chemicals or manure.)
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Accordingly, his enemies succeeded in suppressing the further
      > > > publication of
      > > > > >this book and in removing it from libraries, until it became
      > extremely
      > > > rare
      > > > > >and difficult to obtain. It is more fortunate that a surviving copy
      > came
      > > > > >into the writer's possession.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Dr. Julius Hensel was not only a student of agricultural chemistry,
      > but
      > > > also
      > > > > >biochemistry and nutrition, and he related all these sciences, and
      > > > united
      > > > > >them into a composite science of life, which he labeled
      > "Makro-biology."
      > > > His
      > > > > >theory was that the chemistry of life is basically determined by the
      > > > > >chemistry of the soil, and that chemicals unbalance and pervert soil
      > > > > >chemistry while powdered rocks help restore normal soil mineral
      > balance,
      > > > > >producing foods favorable to health and life.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >His discoveries concerning the value of powdered rocks as soil
      > > > conditioners
      > > > > >and plant foods, though rejected and ridiculed when he first
      > proposed
      > > > them,
      > > > > >were adopted by agricultural science nearly a century later, when
      > the
      > > > > >application of powdered limestone, rock phosphate and other rocks
      > became
      > > > > >standard agricultural practice. Granite, which Hensel recommended as
      > the
      > > > > >most balanced of all rocks as source of soil minerals, was first
      > > > rejected as
      > > > > >worthless, but later appreciated and used as a soil mineralizer.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >During the course of his researches, Dr. Hensel found that in the
      > > > primeval
      > > > > >rocks, as granite, lie a potentially inexhaustible supply of all
      > > > minerals
      > > > > >required for the feeding and regeneration of the soil, plants,
      > animals
      > > > and
      > > > > >man. All that is required is to reduce them to finely a pulverized
      > form,
      > > > so
      > > > > >that their mineral elements may be made available to plants. Hensel
      > > > wrote a
      > > > > >book describing his discovery of a new method of creating more
      > perfect
      > > > > >fruits and vegetables, rich in all nutritional elements and immune
      > to
      > > > > >disease and insect pests, with the result that it produced worm-free
      > > > fruit
      > > > > >without the need of spraying. The foods so produced by rock-meal
      > > > > >fertilization were true Organic Super Foods, far superior in flavor
      > and
      > > > > >value than those produced under the forcing action of manure or
      > chemical
      > > > > >fertilizers.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Hensel was the first to put up a fight against the then-growing new
      > > > chemical
      > > > > >fertilizer industry-a struggle that was continued in the next
      > century by
      > > > Sir
      > > > > >William Howard in England and J. I. Rodale in America.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >The use of chemical fertilizers, claimed Hensel, leads to the
      > following
      > > > evil
      > > > > >consequences:
      > > > > >
      > > > > >It poisons the soil, destroying beneficial soil bacteria, earthworms
      > and
      > > > > >humus. *
      > > > > >
      > > > > >It creates unhealthy, unbalanced, mineral-deficient plants, lacking
      > > > > >resistance to disease and insect pests, thus leading to the spraying
      > > > men-ace
      > > > > >in an effort to preserve these defective specimens.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >It leads to diseases among animals and men who feed on these
      > abnormal
      > > > plants
      > > > > >and their products.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >It leads to a tremendous expense to the farmer, because chemical
      > > > > >fertilizers, being extremely soluble, are quickly washed from the
      > soil
      > > > by
      > > > > >rainfall and needs constant replacement. (Powdered rocks, on the
      > other
      > > > hand,
      > > > > >being less soluble, are not so easily washed from the soil, but keep
      > > > > >releasing minerals to it for many years).
      > > > > >
      > > > > >* Decayed vegetable or animal matter that provides nutrients for
      > plants.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >The use of various pulverized rocks, [such] as granite, limestone,
      > rock
      > > > > >phosphate, etc., in place of chemical fertilizers, will lead,
      > claimed
      > > > > >Hensel, to permanent restoration of even poor soils to the balanced
      > > > mineral
      > > > > >con-tent of the best virgin soils; and the rock dust thus applied
      > will
      > > > > >remain year after year and not be washed away by rains or irrigation
      > > > water,
      > > > > >as is the case with highly soluble chemical fertilizers.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >This will be an economic saving to the grower and enable him to sell
      > > > foods
      > > > > >at a lower price than when he must spend large sums on chemical
      > > > fertilizers.
      > > > > >Also, since foods thus mineralized are healthy and immune to plant
      > > > diseases
      > > > > >and insect pests (as Hensel experimentally demonstrated), there is
      > no
      > > > need
      > > > > >for the expense and dangers of spraying.*
      > > > > >
      > > > > >* Editor's Note: Rock phosphate from some sources contains a high
      > level
      > > > of
      > > > > >the toxic mineral cadmium. It's wise to purchase rock phosphate from
      > a
      > > > > >supplier who's able to provide an analysis.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Foods raised by Hensel's followers, including many German gardeners
      > and
      > > > > >farmers, who were enthusiastic in praise of his method, were found
      > to
      > > > > >possess firmer tissue and better shipping and keeping qualities than
      > > > those
      > > > > >raised with animal manure or chemicals. And most important among the
      > > > > >advantages of Hensel's agricultural discovery is that foods grown on
      > > > > >mineralized soil are higher both in mineral and vitamin content and
      > so
      > > > > >pro-duce better health and greater immunity to disease than those
      > grown
      > > > by
      > > > > >the use of chemical fertilizer sprays.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >To kill insects by poisons applied to plants does not remove the
      > cause
      > > > of
      > > > > >their infestation, and poisons both the insect as well as the human
      > > > consumer
      > > > > >of the sprayed plant. Only correct feeding of the soil, and
      > consequently
      > > > of
      > > > > >plants by trees, by proper methods of fertilization, thereby keeping
      > > > them
      > > > > >well-nourished, vigorous and free from disease, will accomplish
      > this,
      > > > for
      > > > > >insects do not seem to attack healthy plants. It appears that
      > insects,
      > > > like
      > > > > >scavengers, attack chiefly unhealthy and demineralized plants, not
      > > > healthy
      > > > > >ones.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Dr. Charles Northern has performed experiments in which he raised
      > two
      > > > tomato
      > > > > >plants, entwined with each other, in different pots, one being
      > supplied
      > > > with
      > > > > >an abundance of trace minerals, derived from colloidal phosphate,
      > and
      > > > the
      > > > > >other just chemical fertilizer. The tomato plant grown with chemical
      > > > > >fertilizer alone was attacked by insects, while the other one given
      > > > trace
      > > > > >minerals was not.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >*Hensel pointed out that animal manure and chemical fertilizers
      > produce
      > > > a
      > > > > >forced, unnaturally rapid growth of large-sized produce which fail
      > to
      > > > > >acquire the minerals normally secured during a slower, longer
      > > > development.
      > > > > >The result is the production of demineralized, unbalanced plants,
      > which
      > > > are
      > > > > >weak and unhealthy, falling prey to disease and insect pests.
      > > > > >*
      > > > > >*This explains why, coincident with the increased use of chemical
      > > > > >fertilizers, during the past century, insect pests steadily
      > increased.
      > > > So
      > > > > >did cancerous conditions among plants, animals and humans, as shown
      > by
      > > > > >Keens, an English soil chemist, who presents statistics to show that
      > the
      > > > > >increased use of chemical fertilizers is a major cause of the
      > greater
      > > > > >incidence of cancer during that last hundred years.
      > > > > >*
      > > > > >*The modern Organic Farming movement has accepted and propagated one
      > of
      > > > > >Hensel's theories-his opposition to chemical fertilizers and
      > > > recommendation
      > > > > >of powdered rocks in their place-but has failed to appreciate his
      > other
      > > > main
      > > > > >doctrine-his opposition to the use of animal excrement's as plant
      > foods.
      > > > In
      > > > > >this respect, Hensel, though he lived in the last century, [was] far
      > > > ahead
      > > > > >of the Organic Movement and more modern than the most modern
      > > > agricultural
      > > > > >reformer.
      > > > > >*
      > > > > >Hensel had a great admirer and disciple in England, one Sampson
      > Morgan,
      > > > who
      > > > > >founded his "Clean Culture" doctrine on Hensel's philosophy of soil
      > and
      > > > > >biological regeneration by the avoidance of chemical or animal
      > > > fertilizers.
      > > > > >While Hensel was more of a theorist, Morgan was a practical farmer
      > and
      > > > > >agricultural experimenter, who proved the truth of Hensel's theories
      > by
      > > > > >winning the first prize at all agricultural exhibits at which his
      > > > > >super-sized, super-quality, disease - and blight - free rock-dust
      > > > fertilized
      > > > > >fruits and vegetables were displayed. In Sampson Morgan's Clean
      > Culture,
      > > > > >Morgan's views are presented.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >In reality they are Hensel's doctrines transplanted to English soil.
      > The
      > > > > >reading of Morgan's book will be a valuable supplement to [the
      > reading]
      > > > of
      > > > > >this, to give one a thorough understanding of the subject of Natural
      > > > > >Agriculture (i.e., a system of soil culture definitely in advance of
      > > > Organic
      > > > > >Gardening by the compost method).
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Practical experience with Hensel's Stone Meal and his non-animal
      > method
      > > > of
      > > > > >soil regeneration, has proven the following:
      > > > > >
      > > > > >That Stone Meal creates healthier, tastier, more vitaminized and
      > > > mineralized
      > > > > >foods.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >That Stone Meal creates immunity to insect infestation, worms, fungi
      > and
      > > > > >plant diseases of all kinds.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >That Stone Meal improves the keeping and shipping quality of foods,
      > so
      > > > that
      > > > > >they keep a long time, in contrast to the rapid deterioration of
      > foods
      > > > given
      > > > > >abundant animal manure.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >That Stone Meal helps plants to resist drought and frost, enabling
      > them
      > > > to
      > > > > >survive when those fed on manure and chemicals perish.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >That Stone Meal produces larger crops which are more profitable
      > because
      > > > the
      > > > > >farmer is saved the expense of buying chemical fertilizers which are
      > > > rapidly
      > > > > >leached from the soil by rainfall, whereas Stone Meal, being less
      > > > soluble,
      > > > > >is gradually released during the course of years and remain in the
      > soil,
      > > > > >being the most economical of fertilizers.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >That foods raised with Stone Meal are better for human health and
      > the
      > > > > >prevention of disease than those grown with chemicals or animal
      > manure.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >That use of Stone Meal, in place of chemical or animal fertilizers,
      > > > helps to
      > > > > >end the spraying menace (by removing its cause) is proven by the
      > fact
      > > > that
      > > > > >plants and trees grown with Stone Meal are immune to pests and so
      > > > require no
      > > > > >spraying.
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > >
      > http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/supressed_inventions/suppressed_in
      > > > > >ventions20.htm
      > > > > >
      > > > > >----------------------------------------------------------
      > > > > >----------------------------------------------------------
      > > > > >----------------------------------------------------------
      > > > > >-
      > > > > >Boovarahan S
      > > > > >Chennai.
      > > > > >09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
      > > > > >
      > > > > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > > >
      > > > > >------------------------------------
      > > > > >
      > > > > >Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Boovarahan Srinivasan
      Ok ! Bringing in any outside thing is not considered as natural farming. Though Fukuoka did not bring in anything from outside the ducks did it for him. What
      Message 2 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
        Ok !

        Bringing in any outside thing is not considered as natural farming.
        Though Fukuoka did not bring in anything from outside the ducks did it for
        him.
        What if one doesn't grow livestock ?


        Boovarahan S
        Chennai.
        09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • yajnesh shetty
        Fukuoka did use chicken manure from a neighbouring poultry farm. ________________________________ From: Boovarahan Srinivasan To:
        Message 3 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
          Fukuoka did use chicken manure from a neighbouring poultry farm.



          ________________________________
          From: Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 4:37 PM
          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: A nice link


           
          Ok !

          Bringing in any outside thing is not considered as natural farming.
          Though Fukuoka did not bring in anything from outside the ducks did it for
          him.
          What if one doesn't grow livestock ?

          Boovarahan S
          Chennai.
          09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Boovarahan Srinivasan
          May be that is not quite often but rarely. ... -- Boovarahan S Chennai. 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon) [Non-text portions of this message have
          Message 4 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
            May be that is not quite often but rarely.

            On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 4:48 PM, yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Fukuoka did use chicken manure from a neighbouring poultry farm.
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
            > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 4:37 PM
            >
            > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: A nice link
            >
            >
            > Ok !
            >
            > Bringing in any outside thing is not considered as natural farming.
            > Though Fukuoka did not bring in anything from outside the ducks did it for
            > him.
            > What if one doesn't grow livestock ?
            >
            > Boovarahan S
            > Chennai.
            > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >



            --
            Boovarahan S
            Chennai.
            09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Harish Amur
            I have a very basic question: How can crop farming be natural? Where do we find crops that grow the way they grow in our farm in Nature? Where did Fukuoka San
            Message 5 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
              I have a very basic question: How can crop farming be natural? Where do we
              find crops that grow the way they grow in our farm in Nature? Where did
              Fukuoka San see paddy crops growing naturally?

              I ask this out of ignorance and not to challenge anything. Please do not
              misunderstand me.


              On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 6:24 PM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>wrote:

              > May be that is not quite often but rarely.
              >
              > On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 4:48 PM, yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...> wrote:
              >
              > > **
              > >
              > >
              > > Fukuoka did use chicken manure from a neighbouring poultry farm.
              > >
              > > ________________________________
              > > From: Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
              > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
              > > Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 4:37 PM
              > >
              > > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: A nice link
              > >
              > >
              > > Ok !
              > >
              > > Bringing in any outside thing is not considered as natural farming.
              > > Though Fukuoka did not bring in anything from outside the ducks did it
              > for
              > > him.
              > > What if one doesn't grow livestock ?
              > >
              > > Boovarahan S
              > > Chennai.
              > > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > --
              > Boovarahan S
              > Chennai.
              > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ruthie Aquino
              Hi Harish, In my humble opinion, since we are not at the beginning of Creation but at the start of the 21st century then we have to do with the conditions and
              Message 6 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
                Hi Harish,
                In my humble opinion, since we are not at the beginning of Creation but at
                the start of the 21st century then we have to do with the conditions and
                circumstances others through the ages have left us or imposed on us.
                One such thing is farming.
                If we look at present-day hunter-gatherer tribes they have no crops at all,
                they just pick from the forest.
                Then there are more "advanced" communities that have some root crops...etc.,
                but nothing much more. I think they have never heard people discussing
                planting and how to improve it. They just plant. No questions asked.
                Those tribes or ethnic groups have been cut off from civilization, but we
                haven't. We have heard of bumper crops, and Guiness records of the biggest
                and the best, and per capita income and gross national product.
                So...right now after having been introduced to natural farming we try hard
                to do whatever we can.
                I salute Booze whose will is to add nothing to what I gather is a harsh
                environment for his crops. His faith in nature is absolute and he is brave
                enough to go on with his initial idea of do-nothing agriculture.
                However as I said we do not have a clean slate with which to start but one
                upon which man has left his imprints.
                So : to each his own, we try hard to be as close to nature as possible. As
                I said earlier we need to support one another because we
                encounter opposition and incomprehension from those not acquainted with the
                Fukuoka way.
                best
                RUTHIE
                2011/8/3 Harish Amur <harishamur@...>

                > **
                >
                >
                > I have a very basic question: How can crop farming be natural? Where do we
                > find crops that grow the way they grow in our farm in Nature? Where did
                > Fukuoka San see paddy crops growing naturally?
                >
                > I ask this out of ignorance and not to challenge anything. Please do not
                > misunderstand me.
                >
                > On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 6:24 PM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > > May be that is not quite often but rarely.
                > >
                > > On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 4:48 PM, yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > > **
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Fukuoka did use chicken manure from a neighbouring poultry farm.
                > > >
                > > > ________________________________
                > > > From: Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
                > > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                > > > Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 4:37 PM
                > > >
                > > > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: A nice link
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Ok !
                > > >
                > > > Bringing in any outside thing is not considered as natural farming.
                > > > Though Fukuoka did not bring in anything from outside the ducks did it
                > > for
                > > > him.
                > > > What if one doesn't grow livestock ?
                > > >
                > > > Boovarahan S
                > > > Chennai.
                > > > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --
                > > Boovarahan S
                > > Chennai.
                > > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Boovarahan Srinivasan
                Growing or cultivation is itself artificial as we have a prejudice on growing one kind of crop over the others. So logically there can not be 100 % natural
                Message 7 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
                  Growing or cultivation is itself artificial as we have a prejudice on
                  growing one kind of crop over the others. So logically there can not be 100
                  % natural farming . But what we can do is to mimic nature in producing the
                  grains / vegetables of our needs without killing other plants. That's why I
                  never uproot any plant but trim the size . In my sugarcane fields I have not
                  done this trimming too and allowed all weeds and grasses to grow
                  un-interrupted . At present my sugarcane plants just hold their lives
                  without any significant growth from the day of transplanting. I am still
                  hoping that they would soon pick up growth.

                  On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 10:18 PM, Harish Amur <harishamur@...> wrote:

                  > **
                  >
                  >
                  > I have a very basic question: How can crop farming be natural? Where do we
                  > find crops that grow the way they grow in our farm in Nature? Where did
                  > Fukuoka San see paddy crops growing naturally?
                  >
                  > I ask this out of ignorance and not to challenge anything. Please do not
                  > misunderstand me.
                  >

                  Boovarahan S
                  Chennai.
                  09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Harish Amur
                  I had anticipated that you mistake me and so I had added an additional line ... Anyway, I am not against NF. I am a starter, but I have a very strong will to
                  Message 8 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
                    I had anticipated that you mistake me and so I had added an additional line
                    :)

                    Anyway, I am not against NF. I am a starter, but I have a very strong will
                    to not use chemicals in my field. We planted sugarcane in Feb '11 and they
                    have grown 8' tall now. We gave them a bit of 'jeevamruta', which is made
                    out of cow dung, cow urine, some jaggery and some flour. If we have a cow in
                    our farm next year, none of the materials that I list here would have to be
                    brought from outside. Further, this was done only twice. The weeds in the
                    sugar cane field are left to themselves. They are not cut. However there is
                    one weed which is quite dangerous (local knowledge) which we will try to
                    remove in the interest of the people who work there. And I believe that this
                    has to be done.

                    It has been 2 years now that we are growing crops naturally - to the extent
                    possible. And we have got good yield too. However, I have not been able to
                    convince our farmers on no-till and I am also quite confused on this
                    subject. The tilling is done using bullocks and wooden tools. These are not
                    harsh to the land. This opens up the land during the summer to the sun. The
                    insects are dead but are not removed. They reappear in abundance during the
                    rainy season. I felt that this is a natural process, since the land grows
                    dry naturally. Even the tall trees lose all their leaves by March. March and
                    April are the dry months. By May all the leaves reappear and the insect
                    activity resumes. Much like the seeds, the insect eggs or larva hibernates
                    during summer. Ants are very active during these months.

                    Though I wish to move to a no-till farming, I am finding it hard to bring
                    about that change in my farm, as the farmers are used to the bullock
                    assisted farming. They can seed the farm faster this way. I tell them not to
                    weed the farm. They listen to me selectively!

                    If I understand properly, the greatest contribution of Fukuoka-San was to
                    break the 'rigidity' and 'routine' of farming. He listened to his heart. If
                    we become rigid by saying that we should follow what he did and not deviate
                    a bit, it may not be right. As Boovarahan has said earlier, all of his
                    practices may not work in our farm. From this point of view, I wanted to see
                    if I can visit a place where I can get to see crops growing naturally. I
                    have visited a forest and have tried to understand the ambiance to whatever
                    extent possible.

                    Regards,
                    Harish





                    On Thu, Aug 4, 2011 at 7:16 AM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > Growing or cultivation is itself artificial as we have a prejudice on
                    > growing one kind of crop over the others. So logically there can not be 100
                    > % natural farming . But what we can do is to mimic nature in producing the
                    > grains / vegetables of our needs without killing other plants. That's why I
                    > never uproot any plant but trim the size . In my sugarcane fields I have
                    > not
                    > done this trimming too and allowed all weeds and grasses to grow
                    > un-interrupted . At present my sugarcane plants just hold their lives
                    > without any significant growth from the day of transplanting. I am still
                    > hoping that they would soon pick up growth.
                    >
                    > On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 10:18 PM, Harish Amur <harishamur@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > **
                    >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > I have a very basic question: How can crop farming be natural? Where do
                    > we
                    > > find crops that grow the way they grow in our farm in Nature? Where did
                    > > Fukuoka San see paddy crops growing naturally?
                    > >
                    > > I ask this out of ignorance and not to challenge anything. Please do not
                    > > misunderstand me.
                    > >
                    >
                    > Boovarahan S
                    > Chennai.
                    > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Sumant Joshi
                    Harish, I have heard of this Jivamruta. In Maharashtra it is called Amrut Paani. Amrut is the elixir of eternal life and paani is off course water. Proponents
                    Message 9 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
                      Harish, I have heard of this Jivamruta. In Maharashtra it is called Amrut Paani. Amrut is the elixir of eternal life and paani is off course water. Proponents of this thing are fanatical about it's uses. This is a mixture of 400 litres of water, about  5 kilos of cow dung, 5 litres of cow urine (Indian natural farmers insist that the 'local' cows should be used, not the imported cows) and hold your breath, half a kilo each of honey and clarified butter (desi ghee) again from a local cow's milk. Mix the whole thing and apply it to a totally barren acre of land. It supposed to rejuvenate the soil very quickly. You are also supposed to use about 5 kilos of soil from beneath the Banyan tree.



                      Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone


                      Warm regards,

                      Sumant Joshi
                      Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161



                      >________________________________
                      >From: Harish Amur <harishamur@...>
                      >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                      >Sent: Thursday, 4 August 2011 10:01 AM
                      >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: A nice link
                      >
                      >

                      >I had anticipated that you mistake me and so I had added an additional line
                      >:)
                      >
                      >Anyway, I am not against NF. I am a starter, but I have a very strong will
                      >to not use chemicals in my field. We planted sugarcane in Feb '11 and they
                      >have grown 8' tall now. We gave them a bit of 'jeevamruta', which is made
                      >out of cow dung, cow urine, some jaggery and some flour. If we have a cow in
                      >our farm next year, none of the materials that I list here would have to be
                      >brought from outside. Further, this was done only twice. The weeds in the
                      >sugar cane field are left to themselves. They are not cut. However there is
                      >one weed which is quite dangerous (local knowledge) which we will try to
                      >remove in the interest of the people who work there. And I believe that this
                      >has to be done.
                      >
                      >It has been 2 years now that we are growing crops naturally - to the extent
                      >possible. And we have got good yield too. However, I have not been able to
                      >convince our farmers on no-till and I am also quite confused on this
                      >subject. The tilling is done using bullocks and wooden tools. These are not
                      >harsh to the land. This opens up the land during the summer to the sun. The
                      >insects are dead but are not removed. They reappear in abundance during the
                      >rainy season. I felt that this is a natural process, since the land grows
                      >dry naturally. Even the tall trees lose all their leaves by March. March and
                      >April are the dry months. By May all the leaves reappear and the insect
                      >activity resumes. Much like the seeds, the insect eggs or larva hibernates
                      >during summer. Ants are very active during these months.
                      >
                      >Though I wish to move to a no-till farming, I am finding it hard to bring
                      >about that change in my farm, as the farmers are used to the bullock
                      >assisted farming. They can seed the farm faster this way. I tell them not to
                      >weed the farm. They listen to me selectively!
                      >
                      >If I understand properly, the greatest contribution of Fukuoka-San was to
                      >break the 'rigidity' and 'routine' of farming. He listened to his heart. If
                      >we become rigid by saying that we should follow what he did and not deviate
                      >a bit, it may not be right. As Boovarahan has said earlier, all of his
                      >practices may not work in our farm. From this point of view, I wanted to see
                      >if I can visit a place where I can get to see crops growing naturally. I
                      >have visited a forest and have tried to understand the ambiance to whatever
                      >extent possible.
                      >
                      >Regards,
                      >Harish
                      >
                      >On Thu, Aug 4, 2011 at 7:16 AM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>wrote:
                      >
                      >> **
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> Growing or cultivation is itself artificial as we have a prejudice on
                      >> growing one kind of crop over the others. So logically there can not be 100
                      >> % natural farming . But what we can do is to mimic nature in producing the
                      >> grains / vegetables of our needs without killing other plants. That's why I
                      >> never uproot any plant but trim the size . In my sugarcane fields I have
                      >> not
                      >> done this trimming too and allowed all weeds and grasses to grow
                      >> un-interrupted . At present my sugarcane plants just hold their lives
                      >> without any significant growth from the day of transplanting. I am still
                      >> hoping that they would soon pick up growth.
                      >>
                      >> On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 10:18 PM, Harish Amur <harishamur@...> wrote:
                      >>
                      >> > **
                      >>
                      >> >
                      >> >
                      >> > I have a very basic question: How can crop farming be natural? Where do
                      >> we
                      >> > find crops that grow the way they grow in our farm in Nature? Where did
                      >> > Fukuoka San see paddy crops growing naturally?
                      >> >
                      >> > I ask this out of ignorance and not to challenge anything. Please do not
                      >> > misunderstand me.
                      >> >
                      >>
                      >> Boovarahan S
                      >> Chennai.
                      >> 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                      >>
                      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Sumant Joshi
                      Well we have to grow food, don t we? otherwise we would have to turn hunter gatherers. so maybe it isn t natural in the strictest sense of the word but
                      Message 10 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
                        Well we have to 'grow' food, don't we? otherwise we would have to turn hunter gatherers. so maybe it isn't 'natural' in the strictest sense of the word but what Fukuoka San said was to 'imitate' nature' 



                        Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone


                        Warm regards,

                        Sumant Joshi
                        Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161



                        >________________________________
                        >From: Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
                        >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                        >Sent: Thursday, 4 August 2011 7:16 AM
                        >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: A nice link
                        >
                        >

                        >Growing or cultivation is itself artificial as we have a prejudice on
                        >growing one kind of crop over the others. So logically there can not be 100
                        >% natural farming . But what we can do is to mimic nature in producing the
                        >grains / vegetables of our needs without killing other plants. That's why I
                        >never uproot any plant but trim the size . In my sugarcane fields I have not
                        >done this trimming too and allowed all weeds and grasses to grow
                        >un-interrupted . At present my sugarcane plants just hold their lives
                        >without any significant growth from the day of transplanting. I am still
                        >hoping that they would soon pick up growth.
                        >
                        >On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 10:18 PM, Harish Amur <harishamur@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >> **
                        >>
                        >>
                        >> I have a very basic question: How can crop farming be natural? Where do we
                        >> find crops that grow the way they grow in our farm in Nature? Where did
                        >> Fukuoka San see paddy crops growing naturally?
                        >>
                        >> I ask this out of ignorance and not to challenge anything. Please do not
                        >> misunderstand me.
                        >>
                        >
                        >Boovarahan S
                        >Chennai.
                        >09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                        >
                        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Sumant Joshi
                        I like your sense of humour, Ruthie  Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone Warm regards, Sumant Joshi Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161 ... [Non-text portions of
                        Message 11 of 23 , Aug 3, 2011
                          I like your sense of humour, Ruthie 





                          Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone


                          Warm regards,

                          Sumant Joshi
                          Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161



                          >________________________________
                          >From: Ruthie Aquino <ruthieaquino1@...>
                          >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          >Sent: Wednesday, 3 August 2011 10:50 PM
                          >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: A nice link
                          >
                          >Hi Harish,
                          >In my humble opinion, since we are not at the beginning of Creation but at
                          >the start of the 21st century then we have to do with the conditions and
                          >circumstances others through the ages have left us or imposed on us.
                          >One such thing is farming.
                          >If we look at present-day hunter-gatherer tribes they have no crops at all,
                          >they just pick from the forest.
                          >Then there are more "advanced" communities that have some root crops...etc.,
                          >but nothing much more.  I think they have never heard people discussing
                          >planting and how to improve it.  They just plant.  No questions asked.
                          >Those tribes or ethnic groups have been cut off from civilization, but we
                          >haven't.  We have heard of bumper crops, and Guiness records of the biggest
                          >and the best, and per capita income and gross national product.
                          >So...right now after having been introduced to natural farming we try hard
                          >to do whatever we can.
                          >I salute Booze whose will is to add nothing to what I gather is a harsh
                          >environment for his crops.  His faith in nature is absolute and he is brave
                          >enough to go on with his initial idea of do-nothing agriculture.
                          >However as I said we do not have a clean slate with which to start but one
                          >upon which man has left his imprints.
                          >So : to each his own, we try hard to be as close to nature as possible.  As
                          >I said earlier we need to support one another because we
                          >encounter opposition and incomprehension from those not acquainted with the
                          >Fukuoka way.
                          >best
                          >RUTHIE
                          >2011/8/3 Harish Amur <harishamur@...>
                          >
                          >> **
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> I have a very basic question: How can crop farming be natural? Where do we
                          >> find crops that grow the way they grow in our farm in Nature? Where did
                          >> Fukuoka San see paddy crops growing naturally?
                          >>
                          >> I ask this out of ignorance and not to challenge anything. Please do not
                          >> misunderstand me.
                          >>
                          >> On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 6:24 PM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>wrote:
                          >>
                          >>
                          >>
                          >> > May be that is not quite often but rarely.
                          >> >
                          >> > On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 4:48 PM, yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...>
                          >> wrote:
                          >> >
                          >> > > **
                          >> > >
                          >> > >
                          >> > > Fukuoka did use chicken manure from a neighbouring poultry farm.
                          >> > >
                          >> > > ________________________________
                          >> > > From: Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
                          >> > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          >> > > Sent: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 4:37 PM
                          >> > >
                          >> > > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: A nice link
                          >> > >
                          >> > >
                          >> > > Ok !
                          >> > >
                          >> > > Bringing in any outside thing is not considered as natural farming.
                          >> > > Though Fukuoka did not bring in anything from outside the ducks did it
                          >> > for
                          >> > > him.
                          >> > > What if one doesn't grow livestock ?
                          >> > >
                          >> > > Boovarahan S
                          >> > > Chennai.
                          >> > > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                          >> > >
                          >> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >> > >
                          >> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >> > >
                          >> > >
                          >> > >
                          >> >
                          >> >
                          >> >
                          >> > --
                          >> > Boovarahan S
                          >> > Chennai.
                          >> > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                          >> >
                          >> >
                          >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >> >
                          >> >
                          >> >
                          >> > ------------------------------------
                          >> >
                          >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >> >
                          >> >
                          >> >
                          >> >
                          >>
                          >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >>
                          >> 
                          >>
                          >
                          >
                          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >------------------------------------
                          >
                          >Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Boovarahan Srinivasan
                          I have not mistaken you Harish ! I too tread on the same way. I selected a wrong time to sow the sugarcane seedlings and well, that may be one of the reason
                          Message 12 of 23 , Aug 4, 2011
                            I have not mistaken you Harish !

                            I too tread on the same way.

                            I selected a wrong time to sow the sugarcane seedlings and well, that may be
                            one of the reason for the non-growth . Yet I am waiting patiently for mother
                            nature to start her work.

                            On Thu, Aug 4, 2011 at 7:16 AM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>wrote:

                            > Growing or cultivation is itself artificial as we have a prejudice on
                            > growing one kind of crop over the others. So logically there can not be 100
                            > % natural farming . But what we can do is to mimic nature in producing the
                            > grains / vegetables of our needs without killing other plants. That's why I
                            > never uproot any plant but trim the size . In my sugarcane fields I have not
                            > done this trimming too and allowed all weeds and grasses to grow
                            > un-interrupted . At present my sugarcane plants just hold their lives
                            > without any significant growth from the day of transplanting. I am still
                            > hoping that they would soon pick up growth.
                            >
                            > On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 10:18 PM, Harish Amur <harishamur@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >> **
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> I have a very basic question: How can crop farming be natural? Where do we
                            >> find crops that grow the way they grow in our farm in Nature? Where did
                            >> Fukuoka San see paddy crops growing naturally?
                            >>
                            >> I ask this out of ignorance and not to challenge anything. Please do not
                            >> misunderstand me.
                            >>
                            >
                            > Boovarahan S
                            > Chennai.
                            > 09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)
                            >
                            >


                            --
                            Boovarahan S
                            Chennai.
                            09962662717 (Vodafone) , 08825889492 (Videocon)


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