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Lasagna mulch and Synergistic gardening

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  • Larry Haftl
    Emilia, are you familiar with a mulching technique called Lasagna mulching? If so, is it compatible with your Synergistic practices? What do you think of it?
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 1, 2002
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      Emilia, are you familiar with a mulching technique called Lasagna
      mulching? If so, is it compatible with your Synergistic practices?
      What do you think of it?


      Larry Haftl
      larry@...
    • Robert Monie
      Larry, Lasagna mulching probably comes from the book Lasagna Gardening: A New Layer System for Bountiful Gardens- No Digging, No Tilling, No Weeding, No
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 1, 2002
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        Larry,
        Lasagna mulching probably comes from the book Lasagna Gardening: A New Layer System for Bountiful Gardens- No Digging, No Tilling, No Weeding, No Kidding, written by Patricia Lanza, maybe a couple of years ago. This is one somebody should review here and on your new site. The mulching recommended is mainly cardboard and paper layers. Of course, organic gardeners for years have used a technique called "sheet mulching," which this book adapts. The Lasagna Gardening book has been criticized, however, for recommending peat moss as a growing medium.
        Some other tags you could add for the new site would be "synergistic gardening," and "deep mulch gardening." In playing with tags like these on Internet, I came across a book by Ruth Stout called "Don't Forget to Smile, Or How to Stay Sane and Fit Over Ninety." This book is due out sometime later this year. Could it be that Ruth is still alive and kicking, or is this a reissue? If Ruth is still around, maybe she could team up with Fukuoka and coauthor something.
        Bob Moinie
        Larry Haftl wrote:Emilia, are you familiar with a mulching technique called Lasagna
        mulching? If so, is it compatible with your Synergistic practices?
        What do you think of it?


        Larry Haftl
        larry@...









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      • Larry Haftl
        ... Hi Robert (or would you prefer we use Bob?), I knew what it was thanks to a post by Judy Phillips. She mentioned that she has used it successfully in
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 2, 2002
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          At Tuesday, 1 October 2002, Robert Monie wrote:

          >Lasagna mulching probably comes from the book Lasagna Gardening:...

          Hi Robert (or would you prefer we use Bob?),

          I knew what it was thanks to a post by Judy Phillips. She mentioned
          that she has used it successfully in suppressing invasive grasses.
          That DEFINITELY caught my attention. Did some surfing and got a
          pretty good grasp on the technique. I asked Emilia about it because
          I wonder if she thought the use of paper and cardboard on top of
          the soil would would be an effective way to "integrate the litter
          zone with the agricultural soil profile" (from her paper on The Synergistic
          Garden"). I can see how the lasagna mulch could provide a good growing
          medium at the same time it might suppress invasive plants/grasses,
          but would it be an effective way to create the "wild soil" she talks
          about.

          I use a mixture of coconut fiber (coco peat) and vermiculite in my
          tomato containers. The plants grew well and I've been gorging on
          great tomatoes since early June (a minor feat in itself in our climate)
          but it is definitely NOT sustainable gardening. I have to add fertilizers
          and fungus when I transplant into the containers, add more fertilizer
          (epson salts) during the growing season, and will have to start all
          over again from scratch next year. I'm willing to do this now because
          a summer without home grown tomatoes is no summer at all, but I'm
          hoping to get to the point where I can still gorge on tomatoes all
          summer in a sustainable way.

          >Some other tags you could add for the new site would be "synergistic
          gardening,
          >" and "deep mulch gardening."

          Variations of mulch seem appropriate for coverage on the website
          as well as keywords since Fukuoka uses his rice straw as a mulch.
          Thanks for the suggestion.

          Don't know if Ruth Stout is still alive. Doubt if he would be interested
          in co-authoring anything with anyone, but I'd love to be a fly on
          the wall if those two ever got together.


          Larry Haftl
          larry@...
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