Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farmi ng that I gave before members of the Sekai Ky ūsei Kyō"

Expand Messages
  • Jason Stewart
    Does anyone realise the significance of this quoted passage of late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu s autobiographical writing (about his own life)?: . . Quoted from: .
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 24, 2011
      Does anyone realise the significance of this quoted passage of late Mr. Fukuoka
      Masanobu's autobiographical writing (about his own life)?:
      .
      .
      Quoted from:

      .
      1984 (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)
      Published by Shunjūsha (春秋社)
      1984 Aug.
      vii 362p 17p of plates ill. 20cm
      out of print ISBN 978-4-393-74104-7
      .
      ——1987 (English) translation The Road Back to Nature–Regaining the Paradise
      Lost
      ——translated by Frederic P. Metreaud
      ——Japan Publications
      ——first edition 1987 Aug.
      ——377p 8p of plates
      ——out of print ISBN 978-0-87040-673-7.
      .
      .
      (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)
      —Later editions, untranslated:
      ==============================
      Enlarged and revised edition
      1993 April
      458p
      out of print
      ISBN 978-4-393-74114-6
      .
      New edition
      2004 Sept.
      xvi 488p 8p of plates ill. 18.8x13cm
      in print ISBN 978-4-393-74146-7
      .
      .
      —quoting: ".
      The Road Back to Nature
      ––––––––––––––––––––––––Regaining the Paradise Lost
      ––––––––––––––––––––––––
      Masanobu Fukuoka
      .
      Japan Publications, Inc.
      .
      1987 by Masanobu Fukuoka
      .
      Translated by Frederic P. Metreaud
      .
      First edition: August 1987
      .
      ISBN 0–87040–673–6
      .
      Printed in Japan.
      .
      Contents
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...
      ...
      Preface to English Edition
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...
      ...
      Preface to Japanese Edition
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...
      ...
      Introduction:
      Man Doesn't Live by Bread Alone
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...
      All One Has to Do is to Live
      ...
      ...
      [Chapter]
      1
      =====================================
      America–
      Land of Plenty?
      =====================================
      ...
      ...
      Why has California Turned to Desert?

      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      Agriculture Run Amok
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      The Machine Culture is doomed
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      The Natural Foods Boom
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      [Chapter]
      2
      ==================
      Europe As I Saw It
      ==================
      ...
      ...
      Touring Europe in Geta and Monpe
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      The Culture of Meat and Wine
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      Natural Farming Takes Root in Italy
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      The Old Man and the Mill
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      European Civilisation at a Standstill
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      A Green Peace
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      A Message for Peace
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...

      [Chapter]
      3
      ======================
      Food and the Ecosystem
      ======================
      ...
      ...
      ...

      [Chapter]
      4
      =====================================
      Natural Farming: A Personal Testimony
      =====================================

      The Principle and Practice of Natural Farming
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural
      farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō (the Religion for the
      Salvation of the World) in January 1975.
      ***
      I graduated from Gifu Agricultural College and at the age of twenty–five joined
      the plant inspection division at the Yokohama Customs Bureau. There I did
      research in plant pathology and worked as a plant customs inspector for a while.
      I spent countless hours looking through the eyepiece of my microscope. As I did
      so, I noticed that the tiny worlds of the fungi and bacteria have something in
      common with the vast universe of heavenly bodies.
      There are males and there are females in those little fungi too. At the time, I
      was working on crossing molds. Molds bear a close resemblance to man not only in
      their shape, but in everything they do. While I was pursuing these thoughts,
      filled with doubts and wonder, I fell ill [pneumonia]. Then one day [15 May
      1937], prompted by a chance incident, I underwent what I suppose you could call
      a conversion of faith. It was a turning point, I'm not going to get into that
      here, but I had the feeling then that science was some sort of outrageous
      monster.
      Sensing that everything is utterly meaningless, I quit my post at customs
      and headed back to Shikoku. I didn't head straight back, though. I traveled
      around a good bit, during which time I conceived the idea of natural farming
      [自然農法]. On my return to Shikoku, I retreated to my father's orchard to try this
      out. this was during the early years of the war. As the war escalated, a life of
      leisurely isolation in the hills became impossible, so I joined the agricultural
      testing station in neighboring Kōchi Prefecture, where I was placed in charge of
      insect damage and worked through to the end of the war. While at the Kōchi
      testing centre, I did scientific research on farming methods and ran around
      providing guidance and instruction to the local farmers on growing rice and
      barley and on encouraging seed germination. Our goal at the time was to maximize
      food production for the war effort. At the same time, however, I had this idea
      of natural farming [自然農法] in the back of my head [mind]. So along with the
      scientific research I was doing, I also did some research of my own on natural
      farming. When the war ended, I was free to go at last and become a farmer as I
      had desired. I wasted no time in putting my ideas into practice.
      So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing" farming.
      But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to carry
      it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then I've
      farmed in search of these methods.
      Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are.
      ...
      ...
      ...
      [Chapter]
      5
      ====================
      Nature, God, and Man
      ====================
      ...
      ...
      ...
      [Chapter]
      6
      ===============================
      Seeding a Real Green Revolution
      ===============================
      ...
      ...
      We Must Stop the Advance of the Deserts
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...
      Forty Days in Africa
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...
      America Revisited
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...
      Sowing Seed in the Desert
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...
      ...

      A Statement
      –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
      ...
      ...
      ...
      "
      .
      .
      Biggest best wishes to all Japanese and to all,
      .
      Jason Stewart
      —busy in south eastern Oz.
    • Sumant Joshi
      Jason, the last few lines struck me as quite unusual. A man of Fukuoka s stature and experience is saying: So I was still a youth when I happened upon the
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 26, 2011
        Jason, the last few lines struck me as quite unusual. A man of Fukuoka's stature and experience is saying:
        "So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing" farming. 
        But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to carry 
        it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then I've 
        farmed in search of these methods. Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are."

        Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone

        Warm regards,

        Sumant Joshi
        Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161

        --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...> wrote:

        From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 9:50 AM
















         









        Does anyone realise the significance of this quoted passage of late Mr. Fukuoka

        Masanobu's autobiographical writing (about his own life)?:

        .

        .

        Quoted from:



        .

        1984 (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)

        Published by Shunjūsha (春秋社)

        1984 Aug.

        vii 362p 17p of plates ill. 20cm

        out of print ISBN 978-4-393-74104-7

        .

        ——1987 (English) translation The Road Back to Nature–Regaining the Paradise

        Lost

        ——translated by Frederic P. Metreaud

        ——Japan Publications

        ——first edition 1987 Aug.

        ——377p 8p of plates

        ——out of print ISBN 978-0-87040-673-7.

        .

        .

        (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)

        —Later editions, untranslated:

        ==============================

        Enlarged and revised edition

        1993 April

        458p

        out of print

        ISBN 978-4-393-74114-6

        .

        New edition

        2004 Sept.

        xvi 488p 8p of plates ill. 18.8x13cm

        in print ISBN 978-4-393-74146-7

        .

        .

        —quoting: ".

        The Road Back to Nature

        ––––––––––––––––––––––––Regaining the Paradise Lost

        ––––––––––––––––––––––––

        Masanobu Fukuoka

        .

        Japan Publications, Inc.

        .

        1987 by Masanobu Fukuoka

        .

        Translated by Frederic P. Metreaud

        .

        First edition: August 1987

        .

        ISBN 0–87040–673–6

        .

        Printed in Japan.

        .

        Contents

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...

        ...

        Preface to English Edition

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...

        ...

        Preface to Japanese Edition

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...

        ...

        Introduction:

        Man Doesn't Live by Bread Alone

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...

        All One Has to Do is to Live

        ...

        ...

        [Chapter]

        1

        =====================================

        America–

        Land of Plenty?

        =====================================

        ...

        ...

        Why has California Turned to Desert?



        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        Agriculture Run Amok

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        The Machine Culture is doomed

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        The Natural Foods Boom

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        [Chapter]

        2

        ==================

        Europe As I Saw It

        ==================

        ...

        ...

        Touring Europe in Geta and Monpe

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        The Culture of Meat and Wine

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        Natural Farming Takes Root in Italy

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        The Old Man and the Mill

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        European Civilisation at a Standstill

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        A Green Peace

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        A Message for Peace

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...



        [Chapter]

        3

        ======================

        Food and the Ecosystem

        ======================

        ...

        ...

        ...



        [Chapter]

        4

        =====================================

        Natural Farming: A Personal Testimony

        =====================================



        The Principle and Practice of Natural Farming

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural

        farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō (the Religion for the

        Salvation of the World) in January 1975.

        ***

        I graduated from Gifu Agricultural College and at the age of twenty–five joined

        the plant inspection division at the Yokohama Customs Bureau. There I did

        research in plant pathology and worked as a plant customs inspector for a while.

        I spent countless hours looking through the eyepiece of my microscope. As I did

        so, I noticed that the tiny worlds of the fungi and bacteria have something in

        common with the vast universe of heavenly bodies.

        There are males and there are females in those little fungi too. At the time, I

        was working on crossing molds. Molds bear a close resemblance to man not only in

        their shape, but in everything they do. While I was pursuing these thoughts,

        filled with doubts and wonder, I fell ill [pneumonia]. Then one day [15 May

        1937], prompted by a chance incident, I underwent what I suppose you could call

        a conversion of faith. It was a turning point, I'm not going to get into that

        here, but I had the feeling then that science was some sort of outrageous

        monster.

        Sensing that everything is utterly meaningless, I quit my post at customs

        and headed back to Shikoku. I didn't head straight back, though. I traveled

        around a good bit, during which time I conceived the idea of natural farming

        [自然農法]. On my return to Shikoku, I retreated to my father's orchard to try this

        out. this was during the early years of the war. As the war escalated, a life of

        leisurely isolation in the hills became impossible, so I joined the agricultural

        testing station in neighboring Kōchi Prefecture, where I was placed in charge of

        insect damage and worked through to the end of the war. While at the Kōchi

        testing centre, I did scientific research on farming methods and ran around

        providing guidance and instruction to the local farmers on growing rice and

        barley and on encouraging seed germination. Our goal at the time was to maximize

        food production for the war effort. At the same time, however, I had this idea

        of natural farming [自然農法] in the back of my head [mind]. So along with the

        scientific research I was doing, I also did some research of my own on natural

        farming. When the war ended, I was free to go at last and become a farmer as I

        had desired. I wasted no time in putting my ideas into practice.

        So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing" farming.

        But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to carry

        it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then I've

        farmed in search of these methods.

        Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are.

        ...

        ...

        ...

        [Chapter]

        5

        ====================

        Nature, God, and Man

        ====================

        ...

        ...

        ...

        [Chapter]

        6

        ===============================

        Seeding a Real Green Revolution

        ===============================

        ...

        ...

        We Must Stop the Advance of the Deserts

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...

        Forty Days in Africa

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...

        America Revisited

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...

        Sowing Seed in the Desert

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...

        ...



        A Statement

        –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

        ...

        ...

        ...

        "

        .

        .

        Biggest best wishes to all Japanese and to all,

        .

        Jason Stewart

        —busy in south eastern Oz.



























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ruthie Aquino
        He s humble, that s why. Which also means wise. Unlike the majority of us who think we know all and speak and act as such. 2011/4/26 Sumant Joshi
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 26, 2011
          He's humble, that's why.
          Which also means wise.
          Unlike the majority of us who think we know all and speak and act as such.


          2011/4/26 Sumant Joshi <sumant_jo@...>

          >
          >
          > Jason, the last few lines struck me as quite unusual. A man of Fukuoka's
          > stature and experience is saying:
          >
          > "So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing"
          > farming.
          > But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to
          > carry
          > it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then
          > I've
          > farmed in search of these methods. Eventually, I came to have some idea of
          > what these are."
          >
          > Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone
          >
          > Warm regards,
          >
          > Sumant Joshi
          > Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161
          >
          > --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
          > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my
          > experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of
          > the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"
          > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 9:50 AM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Does anyone realise the significance of this quoted passage of late Mr.
          > Fukuoka
          >
          > Masanobu's autobiographical writing (about his own life)?:
          >
          > .
          >
          > .
          >
          > Quoted from:
          >
          > .
          >
          > 1984 (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)
          >
          > Published by Shunjūsha (春秋社)
          >
          > 1984 Aug.
          >
          > vii 362p 17p of plates ill. 20cm
          >
          > out of print ISBN 978-4-393-74104-7
          >
          > .
          >
          > ——1987 (English) translation The Road Back to Nature–Regaining the Paradise
          >
          >
          > Lost
          >
          > ——translated by Frederic P. Metreaud
          >
          > ——Japan Publications
          >
          > ——first edition 1987 Aug.
          >
          > ——377p 8p of plates
          >
          > ——out of print ISBN 978-0-87040-673-7.
          >
          > .
          >
          > .
          >
          > (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)
          >
          > —Later editions, untranslated:
          >
          > ==============================
          >
          > Enlarged and revised edition
          >
          > 1993 April
          >
          > 458p
          >
          > out of print
          >
          > ISBN 978-4-393-74114-6
          >
          > .
          >
          > New edition
          >
          > 2004 Sept.
          >
          > xvi 488p 8p of plates ill. 18.8x13cm
          >
          > in print ISBN 978-4-393-74146-7
          >
          > .
          >
          > .
          >
          > —quoting: ".
          >
          > The Road Back to Nature
          >
          > ––––––––––––––––––––––––Regaining the Paradise Lost
          >
          > ––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > Masanobu Fukuoka
          >
          > .
          >
          > Japan Publications, Inc.
          >
          > .
          >
          > 1987 by Masanobu Fukuoka
          >
          > .
          >
          > Translated by Frederic P. Metreaud
          >
          > .
          >
          > First edition: August 1987
          >
          > .
          >
          > ISBN 0–87040–673–6
          >
          > .
          >
          > Printed in Japan.
          >
          > .
          >
          > Contents
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Preface to English Edition
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Preface to Japanese Edition
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Introduction:
          >
          > Man Doesn't Live by Bread Alone
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...
          >
          > All One Has to Do is to Live
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > [Chapter]
          >
          > 1
          >
          > =====================================
          >
          > America–
          >
          > Land of Plenty?
          >
          > =====================================
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Why has California Turned to Desert?
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Agriculture Run Amok
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > The Machine Culture is doomed
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > The Natural Foods Boom
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > [Chapter]
          >
          > 2
          >
          > ==================
          >
          > Europe As I Saw It
          >
          > ==================
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Touring Europe in Geta and Monpe
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > The Culture of Meat and Wine
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Natural Farming Takes Root in Italy
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > The Old Man and the Mill
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > European Civilisation at a Standstill
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > A Green Peace
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > A Message for Peace
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > [Chapter]
          >
          > 3
          >
          > ======================
          >
          > Food and the Ecosystem
          >
          > ======================
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > [Chapter]
          >
          > 4
          >
          > =====================================
          >
          > Natural Farming: A Personal Testimony
          >
          > =====================================
          >
          > The Principle and Practice of Natural Farming
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to
          > natural
          >
          > farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō (the Religion
          > for the
          >
          > Salvation of the World) in January 1975.
          >
          > ***
          >
          > I graduated from Gifu Agricultural College and at the age of twenty–five
          > joined
          >
          > the plant inspection division at the Yokohama Customs Bureau. There I did
          >
          > research in plant pathology and worked as a plant customs inspector for a
          > while.
          >
          > I spent countless hours looking through the eyepiece of my microscope. As I
          > did
          >
          > so, I noticed that the tiny worlds of the fungi and bacteria have something
          > in
          >
          > common with the vast universe of heavenly bodies.
          >
          > There are males and there are females in those little fungi too. At the
          > time, I
          >
          > was working on crossing molds. Molds bear a close resemblance to man not
          > only in
          >
          > their shape, but in everything they do. While I was pursuing these
          > thoughts,
          >
          > filled with doubts and wonder, I fell ill [pneumonia]. Then one day [15 May
          >
          >
          > 1937], prompted by a chance incident, I underwent what I suppose you could
          > call
          >
          > a conversion of faith. It was a turning point, I'm not going to get into
          > that
          >
          > here, but I had the feeling then that science was some sort of outrageous
          >
          > monster.
          >
          > Sensing that everything is utterly meaningless, I quit my post at customs
          >
          > and headed back to Shikoku. I didn't head straight back, though. I traveled
          >
          >
          > around a good bit, during which time I conceived the idea of natural
          > farming
          >
          > [自然農法]. On my return to Shikoku, I retreated to my father's orchard to try
          > this
          >
          > out. this was during the early years of the war. As the war escalated, a
          > life of
          >
          > leisurely isolation in the hills became impossible, so I joined the
          > agricultural
          >
          > testing station in neighboring Kōchi Prefecture, where I was placed in
          > charge of
          >
          > insect damage and worked through to the end of the war. While at the Kōchi
          >
          > testing centre, I did scientific research on farming methods and ran around
          >
          >
          > providing guidance and instruction to the local farmers on growing rice and
          >
          >
          > barley and on encouraging seed germination. Our goal at the time was to
          > maximize
          >
          > food production for the war effort. At the same time, however, I had this
          > idea
          >
          > of natural farming [自然農法] in the back of my head [mind]. So along with the
          >
          > scientific research I was doing, I also did some research of my own on
          > natural
          >
          > farming. When the war ended, I was free to go at last and become a farmer
          > as I
          >
          > had desired. I wasted no time in putting my ideas into practice.
          >
          > So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing"
          > farming.
          >
          > But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to
          > carry
          >
          > it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then
          > I've
          >
          > farmed in search of these methods.
          >
          > Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are.
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > [Chapter]
          >
          > 5
          >
          > ====================
          >
          > Nature, God, and Man
          >
          > ====================
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > [Chapter]
          >
          > 6
          >
          > ===============================
          >
          > Seeding a Real Green Revolution
          >
          > ===============================
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > We Must Stop the Advance of the Deserts
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Forty Days in Africa
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > America Revisited
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > Sowing Seed in the Desert
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > A Statement
          >
          > –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > ...
          >
          > "
          >
          > .
          >
          > .
          >
          > Biggest best wishes to all Japanese and to all,
          >
          > .
          >
          > Jason Stewart
          >
          > —busy in south eastern Oz.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jason Stewart
          Please elaborate what strikes you in your thoughts about theses words Dear Mr. Sumant. ________________________________ From: Sumant Joshi
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 27, 2011
            Please elaborate what strikes you in your thoughts about theses words Dear Mr. Sumant.


            ________________________________
            From: Sumant Joshi <sumant_jo@...>
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2011 2:30 AM
            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"


             
            Jason, the last few lines struck me as quite unusual. A man of Fukuoka's stature and experience is saying:
            "So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing" farming. 
            But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to carry 
            it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then I've 
            farmed in search of these methods. Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are."

            Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone

            Warm regards,

            Sumant Joshi
            Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161

            --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...> wrote:

            From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
            Subject: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 9:50 AM

             

            Does anyone realise the significance of this quoted passage of late Mr. Fukuoka

            Masanobu's autobiographical writing (about his own life)?:

            .

            .

            Quoted from:

            .

            1984 (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)

            Published by Shunjūsha (春秋社)

            1984 Aug.

            vii 362p 17p of plates ill. 20cm

            out of print ISBN 978-4-393-74104-7

            .

            ——1987 (English) translation The Road Back to Nature–Regaining the Paradise

            Lost

            ——translated by Frederic P. Metreaud

            ——Japan Publications

            ——first edition 1987 Aug.

            ——377p 8p of plates

            ——out of print ISBN 978-0-87040-673-7.

            .

            .

            (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)

            —Later editions, untranslated:

            ==============================

            Enlarged and revised edition

            1993 April

            458p

            out of print

            ISBN 978-4-393-74114-6

            .

            New edition

            2004 Sept.

            xvi 488p 8p of plates ill. 18.8x13cm

            in print ISBN 978-4-393-74146-7

            .

            .

            —quoting: ".

            The Road Back to Nature

            ––––––––––––––––––––––––Regaining the Paradise Lost

            ––––––––––––––––––––––––

            Masanobu Fukuoka

            .

            Japan Publications, Inc.

            .

            1987 by Masanobu Fukuoka

            .

            Translated by Frederic P. Metreaud

            .

            First edition: August 1987

            .

            ISBN 0–87040–673–6

            .

            Printed in Japan.

            .

            Contents

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...

            ...

            Preface to English Edition

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...

            ...

            Preface to Japanese Edition

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...

            ...

            Introduction:

            Man Doesn't Live by Bread Alone

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...

            All One Has to Do is to Live

            ...

            ...

            [Chapter]

            1

            =====================================

            America–

            Land of Plenty?

            =====================================

            ...

            ...

            Why has California Turned to Desert?

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            Agriculture Run Amok

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            The Machine Culture is doomed

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            The Natural Foods Boom

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            [Chapter]

            2

            ==================

            Europe As I Saw It

            ==================

            ...

            ...

            Touring Europe in Geta and Monpe

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            The Culture of Meat and Wine

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            Natural Farming Takes Root in Italy

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            The Old Man and the Mill

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            European Civilisation at a Standstill

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            A Green Peace

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            A Message for Peace

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            [Chapter]

            3

            ======================

            Food and the Ecosystem

            ======================

            ...

            ...

            ...

            [Chapter]

            4

            =====================================

            Natural Farming: A Personal Testimony

            =====================================

            The Principle and Practice of Natural Farming

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural

            farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō (the Religion for the

            Salvation of the World) in January 1975.

            ***

            I graduated from Gifu Agricultural College and at the age of twenty–five joined

            the plant inspection division at the Yokohama Customs Bureau. There I did

            research in plant pathology and worked as a plant customs inspector for a while.

            I spent countless hours looking through the eyepiece of my microscope. As I did

            so, I noticed that the tiny worlds of the fungi and bacteria have something in

            common with the vast universe of heavenly bodies.

            There are males and there are females in those little fungi too. At the time, I

            was working on crossing molds. Molds bear a close resemblance to man not only in

            their shape, but in everything they do. While I was pursuing these thoughts,

            filled with doubts and wonder, I fell ill [pneumonia]. Then one day [15 May

            1937], prompted by a chance incident, I underwent what I suppose you could call

            a conversion of faith. It was a turning point, I'm not going to get into that

            here, but I had the feeling then that science was some sort of outrageous

            monster.

            Sensing that everything is utterly meaningless, I quit my post at customs

            and headed back to Shikoku. I didn't head straight back, though. I traveled

            around a good bit, during which time I conceived the idea of natural farming

            [自然農法]. On my return to Shikoku, I retreated to my father's orchard to try this

            out. this was during the early years of the war. As the war escalated, a life of

            leisurely isolation in the hills became impossible, so I joined the agricultural

            testing station in neighboring Kōchi Prefecture, where I was placed in charge of

            insect damage and worked through to the end of the war. While at the Kōchi

            testing centre, I did scientific research on farming methods and ran around

            providing guidance and instruction to the local farmers on growing rice and

            barley and on encouraging seed germination. Our goal at the time was to maximize

            food production for the war effort. At the same time, however, I had this idea

            of natural farming [自然農法] in the back of my head [mind]. So along with the

            scientific research I was doing, I also did some research of my own on natural

            farming. When the war ended, I was free to go at last and become a farmer as I

            had desired. I wasted no time in putting my ideas into practice.

            So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing" farming.

            But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to carry

            it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then I've

            farmed in search of these methods.

            Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are.

            ...

            ...

            ...

            [Chapter]

            5

            ====================

            Nature, God, and Man

            ====================

            ...

            ...

            ...

            [Chapter]

            6

            ===============================

            Seeding a Real Green Revolution

            ===============================

            ...

            ...

            We Must Stop the Advance of the Deserts

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            Forty Days in Africa

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            America Revisited

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            Sowing Seed in the Desert

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            ...

            A Statement

            –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

            ...

            ...

            ...

            "

            .

            .

            Biggest best wishes to all Japanese and to all,

            .

            Jason Stewart

            —busy in south eastern Oz.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Sumant Joshi
            Like I said, it is unusual to be humble. There are many people who will claim to know a lot after working for just a few years or after reading a few more
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 27, 2011
              Like I said, it is unusual to be humble. There are many people who will claim to know a lot after working for just a few years or after 'reading a few more books than others'. But that isn't knowledge. Fukuoka San lived his words and knowledge and yet he was humble enough to say he learnt a little after thirty years. I doubt he ever tried to humiliate anyone just because he thought he knew what he did.
              Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone

              Warm regards,

              Sumant Joshi
              Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161

              --- On Wed, 27/4/11, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...> wrote:

              From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
              Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"
              To: "fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com" <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
              Date: Wednesday, 27 April, 2011, 2:46 PM
















               









              Please elaborate what strikes you in your thoughts about theses words Dear Mr. Sumant.



              ________________________________

              From: Sumant Joshi <sumant_jo@...>

              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com

              Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2011 2:30 AM

              Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"



               

              Jason, the last few lines struck me as quite unusual. A man of Fukuoka's stature and experience is saying:

              "So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing" farming. 

              But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to carry 

              it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then I've 

              farmed in search of these methods. Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are."



              Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone



              Warm regards,



              Sumant Joshi

              Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161



              --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...> wrote:



              From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>

              Subject: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"

              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com

              Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 9:50 AM



               



              Does anyone realise the significance of this quoted passage of late Mr. Fukuoka



              Masanobu's autobiographical writing (about his own life)?:



              .



              .



              Quoted from:



              .



              1984 (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)



              Published by Shunjūsha (春秋社)



              1984 Aug.



              vii 362p 17p of plates ill. 20cm



              out of print ISBN 978-4-393-74104-7



              .



              ——1987 (English) translation The Road Back to Nature–Regaining the Paradise



              Lost



              ——translated by Frederic P. Metreaud



              ——Japan Publications



              ——first edition 1987 Aug.



              ——377p 8p of plates



              ——out of print ISBN 978-0-87040-673-7.



              .



              .



              (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)



              —Later editions, untranslated:



              ==============================



              Enlarged and revised edition



              1993 April



              458p



              out of print



              ISBN 978-4-393-74114-6



              .



              New edition



              2004 Sept.



              xvi 488p 8p of plates ill. 18.8x13cm



              in print ISBN 978-4-393-74146-7



              .



              .



              —quoting: ".



              The Road Back to Nature



              ––––––––––––––––––––––––Regaining the Paradise Lost



              ––––––––––––––––––––––––



              Masanobu Fukuoka



              .



              Japan Publications, Inc.



              .



              1987 by Masanobu Fukuoka



              .



              Translated by Frederic P. Metreaud



              .



              First edition: August 1987



              .



              ISBN 0–87040–673–6



              .



              Printed in Japan.



              .



              Contents



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...



              ...



              Preface to English Edition



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...



              ...



              Preface to Japanese Edition



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...



              ...



              Introduction:



              Man Doesn't Live by Bread Alone



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...



              All One Has to Do is to Live



              ...



              ...



              [Chapter]



              1



              =====================================



              America–



              Land of Plenty?



              =====================================



              ...



              ...



              Why has California Turned to Desert?



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              Agriculture Run Amok



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              The Machine Culture is doomed



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              The Natural Foods Boom



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              [Chapter]



              2



              ==================



              Europe As I Saw It



              ==================



              ...



              ...



              Touring Europe in Geta and Monpe



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              The Culture of Meat and Wine



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              Natural Farming Takes Root in Italy



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              The Old Man and the Mill



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              European Civilisation at a Standstill



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              A Green Peace



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              A Message for Peace



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              [Chapter]



              3



              ======================



              Food and the Ecosystem



              ======================



              ...



              ...



              ...



              [Chapter]



              4



              =====================================



              Natural Farming: A Personal Testimony



              =====================================



              The Principle and Practice of Natural Farming



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural



              farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō (the Religion for the



              Salvation of the World) in January 1975.



              ***



              I graduated from Gifu Agricultural College and at the age of twenty–five joined



              the plant inspection division at the Yokohama Customs Bureau. There I did



              research in plant pathology and worked as a plant customs inspector for a while.



              I spent countless hours looking through the eyepiece of my microscope. As I did



              so, I noticed that the tiny worlds of the fungi and bacteria have something in



              common with the vast universe of heavenly bodies.



              There are males and there are females in those little fungi too. At the time, I



              was working on crossing molds. Molds bear a close resemblance to man not only in



              their shape, but in everything they do. While I was pursuing these thoughts,



              filled with doubts and wonder, I fell ill [pneumonia]. Then one day [15 May



              1937], prompted by a chance incident, I underwent what I suppose you could call



              a conversion of faith. It was a turning point, I'm not going to get into that



              here, but I had the feeling then that science was some sort of outrageous



              monster.



              Sensing that everything is utterly meaningless, I quit my post at customs



              and headed back to Shikoku. I didn't head straight back, though. I traveled



              around a good bit, during which time I conceived the idea of natural farming



              [自然農法]. On my return to Shikoku, I retreated to my father's orchard to try this



              out. this was during the early years of the war. As the war escalated, a life of



              leisurely isolation in the hills became impossible, so I joined the agricultural



              testing station in neighboring Kōchi Prefecture, where I was placed in charge of



              insect damage and worked through to the end of the war. While at the Kōchi



              testing centre, I did scientific research on farming methods and ran around



              providing guidance and instruction to the local farmers on growing rice and



              barley and on encouraging seed germination. Our goal at the time was to maximize



              food production for the war effort. At the same time, however, I had this idea



              of natural farming [自然農法] in the back of my head [mind]. So along with the



              scientific research I was doing, I also did some research of my own on natural



              farming. When the war ended, I was free to go at last and become a farmer as I



              had desired. I wasted no time in putting my ideas into practice.



              So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing" farming.



              But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to carry



              it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then I've



              farmed in search of these methods.



              Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are.



              ...



              ...



              ...



              [Chapter]



              5



              ====================



              Nature, God, and Man



              ====================



              ...



              ...



              ...



              [Chapter]



              6



              ===============================



              Seeding a Real Green Revolution



              ===============================



              ...



              ...



              We Must Stop the Advance of the Deserts



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              Forty Days in Africa



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              America Revisited



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              Sowing Seed in the Desert



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              ...



              A Statement



              –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



              ...



              ...



              ...



              "



              .



              .



              Biggest best wishes to all Japanese and to all,



              .



              Jason Stewart



              —busy in south eastern Oz.



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



























              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Sumant Joshi
              Like I said, it is unusual to be humble. There are many people who will claim to know a lot after working for just a few years or after reading a few more
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 27, 2011
                Like I said, it is unusual to be humble. There are many people who will claim to know a lot after working for just a few years or after 'reading a few more books than others'. But that isn't knowledge. Fukuoka San lived his words and knowledge and yet he was humble enough to say he learnt a little after thirty years. I doubt he ever tried to humiliate anyone just because he thought he knew what he did.
                Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone

                Warm regards,

                Sumant Joshi
                Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161

                --- On Wed, 27/4/11, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...> wrote:

                From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
                Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"
                To: "fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com" <fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com>
                Date: Wednesday, 27 April, 2011, 2:46 PM
















                 









                Please elaborate what strikes you in your thoughts about theses words Dear Mr. Sumant.



                ________________________________

                From: Sumant Joshi <sumant_jo@...>

                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com

                Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2011 2:30 AM

                Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"



                 

                Jason, the last few lines struck me as quite unusual. A man of Fukuoka's stature and experience is saying:

                "So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing" farming. 

                But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to carry 

                it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then I've 

                farmed in search of these methods. Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are."



                Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone



                Warm regards,



                Sumant Joshi

                Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161



                --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...> wrote:



                From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>

                Subject: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"

                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com

                Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 9:50 AM



                 



                Does anyone realise the significance of this quoted passage of late Mr. Fukuoka



                Masanobu's autobiographical writing (about his own life)?:



                .



                .



                Quoted from:



                .



                1984 (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)



                Published by Shunjūsha (春秋社)



                1984 Aug.



                vii 362p 17p of plates ill. 20cm



                out of print ISBN 978-4-393-74104-7



                .



                ——1987 (English) translation The Road Back to Nature–Regaining the Paradise



                Lost



                ——translated by Frederic P. Metreaud



                ——Japan Publications



                ——first edition 1987 Aug.



                ——377p 8p of plates



                ——out of print ISBN 978-0-87040-673-7.



                .



                .



                (Japanese) 自然に還る (shizen ni kaeru)



                —Later editions, untranslated:



                ==============================



                Enlarged and revised edition



                1993 April



                458p



                out of print



                ISBN 978-4-393-74114-6



                .



                New edition



                2004 Sept.



                xvi 488p 8p of plates ill. 18.8x13cm



                in print ISBN 978-4-393-74146-7



                .



                .



                —quoting: ".



                The Road Back to Nature



                ––––––––––––––––––––––––Regaining the Paradise Lost



                ––––––––––––––––––––––––



                Masanobu Fukuoka



                .



                Japan Publications, Inc.



                .



                1987 by Masanobu Fukuoka



                .



                Translated by Frederic P. Metreaud



                .



                First edition: August 1987



                .



                ISBN 0–87040–673–6



                .



                Printed in Japan.



                .



                Contents



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...



                ...



                Preface to English Edition



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...



                ...



                Preface to Japanese Edition



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...



                ...



                Introduction:



                Man Doesn't Live by Bread Alone



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––...



                All One Has to Do is to Live



                ...



                ...



                [Chapter]



                1



                =====================================



                America–



                Land of Plenty?



                =====================================



                ...



                ...



                Why has California Turned to Desert?



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                Agriculture Run Amok



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                The Machine Culture is doomed



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                The Natural Foods Boom



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                [Chapter]



                2



                ==================



                Europe As I Saw It



                ==================



                ...



                ...



                Touring Europe in Geta and Monpe



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                The Culture of Meat and Wine



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                Natural Farming Takes Root in Italy



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                The Old Man and the Mill



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                European Civilisation at a Standstill



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                A Green Peace



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                A Message for Peace



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                [Chapter]



                3



                ======================



                Food and the Ecosystem



                ======================



                ...



                ...



                ...



                [Chapter]



                4



                =====================================



                Natural Farming: A Personal Testimony



                =====================================



                The Principle and Practice of Natural Farming



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural



                farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō (the Religion for the



                Salvation of the World) in January 1975.



                ***



                I graduated from Gifu Agricultural College and at the age of twenty–five joined



                the plant inspection division at the Yokohama Customs Bureau. There I did



                research in plant pathology and worked as a plant customs inspector for a while.



                I spent countless hours looking through the eyepiece of my microscope. As I did



                so, I noticed that the tiny worlds of the fungi and bacteria have something in



                common with the vast universe of heavenly bodies.



                There are males and there are females in those little fungi too. At the time, I



                was working on crossing molds. Molds bear a close resemblance to man not only in



                their shape, but in everything they do. While I was pursuing these thoughts,



                filled with doubts and wonder, I fell ill [pneumonia]. Then one day [15 May



                1937], prompted by a chance incident, I underwent what I suppose you could call



                a conversion of faith. It was a turning point, I'm not going to get into that



                here, but I had the feeling then that science was some sort of outrageous



                monster.



                Sensing that everything is utterly meaningless, I quit my post at customs



                and headed back to Shikoku. I didn't head straight back, though. I traveled



                around a good bit, during which time I conceived the idea of natural farming



                [自然農法]. On my return to Shikoku, I retreated to my father's orchard to try this



                out. this was during the early years of the war. As the war escalated, a life of



                leisurely isolation in the hills became impossible, so I joined the agricultural



                testing station in neighboring Kōchi Prefecture, where I was placed in charge of



                insect damage and worked through to the end of the war. While at the Kōchi



                testing centre, I did scientific research on farming methods and ran around



                providing guidance and instruction to the local farmers on growing rice and



                barley and on encouraging seed germination. Our goal at the time was to maximize



                food production for the war effort. At the same time, however, I had this idea



                of natural farming [自然農法] in the back of my head [mind]. So along with the



                scientific research I was doing, I also did some research of my own on natural



                farming. When the war ended, I was free to go at last and become a farmer as I



                had desired. I wasted no time in putting my ideas into practice.



                So I was still a youth when I happened upon the idea of "do-nothing" farming.



                But although I knew that such a way existed, I had no idea at first how to carry



                it out in practice. I didn't know the methods. For thirty years since then I've



                farmed in search of these methods.



                Eventually, I came to have some idea of what these are.



                ...



                ...



                ...



                [Chapter]



                5



                ====================



                Nature, God, and Man



                ====================



                ...



                ...



                ...



                [Chapter]



                6



                ===============================



                Seeding a Real Green Revolution



                ===============================



                ...



                ...



                We Must Stop the Advance of the Deserts



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                Forty Days in Africa



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                America Revisited



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                Sowing Seed in the Desert



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                ...



                A Statement



                –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



                ...



                ...



                ...



                "



                .



                .



                Biggest best wishes to all Japanese and to all,



                .



                Jason Stewart



                —busy in south eastern Oz.



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

















                Reply to sender |


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Boovarahan Srinivasan
                The more you learn and know , the more humble you become. There is a saying in Tamil What is learnt is handful and what is not learnt is of world size . And
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 27, 2011
                  The more you learn and know , the more humble you become.
                  There is a saying in Tamil " What is learnt is handful and what is not
                  learnt is of world size". And when one realises this from the bottom of
                  one's heart , naturally one becomes humble.

                  On Wed, Apr 27, 2011 at 4:22 PM, Sumant Joshi <sumant_jo@...> wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  > Like I said, it is unusual to be humble. There are many people who will
                  > claim to know a lot after working for just a few years or after 'reading a
                  > few more books than others'. But that isn't knowledge. Fukuoka San lived his
                  > words and knowledge and yet he was humble enough to say he learnt a little
                  > after thirty years. I doubt he ever tried to humiliate anyone just because
                  > he thought he knew what he did.
                  > Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone
                  >
                  > Warm regards,
                  >
                  > Sumant Joshi
                  > Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161
                  >
                  Boovarahan S


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Sumant Joshi
                  In Hindi there is a saying which means. A humble person is like a fruit tree. The more fruits (knowledge) he/ she has, more it is bent (humble). Sent from my
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 29, 2011
                    In Hindi there is a saying which means. A humble person is like a fruit tree. The more fruits (knowledge) he/ she has, more it is bent (humble).
                    Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone

                    Warm regards,

                    Sumant Joshi
                    Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161

                    --- On Wed, 27/4/11, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...> wrote:

                    From: Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>
                    Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] 1975: "Here is the text of a speech outlining my experiences and approach to natural farming that I gave before members of the Sekai Kyūsei Kyō"
                    To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Wednesday, 27 April, 2011, 6:04 PM
















                     









                    The more you learn and know , the more humble you become.

                    There is a saying in Tamil " What is learnt is handful and what is not

                    learnt is of world size". And when one realises this from the bottom of

                    one's heart , naturally one becomes humble.



                    On Wed, Apr 27, 2011 at 4:22 PM, Sumant Joshi <sumant_jo@...> wrote:



                    >

                    >

                    > Like I said, it is unusual to be humble. There are many people who will

                    > claim to know a lot after working for just a few years or after 'reading a

                    > few more books than others'. But that isn't knowledge. Fukuoka San lived his

                    > words and knowledge and yet he was humble enough to say he learnt a little

                    > after thirty years. I doubt he ever tried to humiliate anyone just because

                    > he thought he knew what he did.

                    > Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone

                    >

                    > Warm regards,

                    >

                    > Sumant Joshi

                    > Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161

                    >

                    Boovarahan S



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



























                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.