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RE: J.P.'s Bermuda Grass Invasion

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  • J. P.
    first of all, let me correct that the bermuda grass invasions are far from seasonal - they are definitely year round, and more intensive at some times of year!
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 1, 2002
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      first of all, let me correct that the bermuda grass invasions are far from
      seasonal - they are definitely year round, and more intensive at some times
      of year!

      interesting that you bring up buckwheat. there was some in the beneficial
      flowers mix I used from Bountiful Gardens, and I actually don't recall any
      bermuda grass coming in at that area! I shall have to experiment further!
      I love the idea of planting something I could harvest, to deal with the
      monsters! I had read of an herb - I want to say comfrey but I may have that
      wrong - that creates such a barrier nothing can get through. but then it's
      said that you can never get rid of the herb, so I lost interest. sounded a
      lot like substituting one voracious monster for another.
      horsetail reeds are dangerous here - plant one, adn they move in,
      everywhere. bamboo either fusses, or it loves ya, and if the latter, STAND
      BACK! we don't have a cold winter to freeze it back into submission, so it
      takes over. so "tenacious horizontal roots" may be more of a problem than a
      solution in this climate.
      I'd like to try a western ginger, asarum caudatum (spelling?), but it's
      apparently a delicate plant here, for shade and heavy loam areas, which I
      can accomodate in an odd pocket onthe opposite side of the property from
      this bermudagrass issue.


      Bob wrote:

      Joanne writes that her garden is in "what used to be a bermuda grass . . .
      lawninsh area." What can she do to stop the seasonal bermuda grass
      invasions?

      Traditionally, buckwheat snuffs out many "weeds," sometimes even grasses.
      Botanically a grass itself, buckwheat may have "insider's knowledge" in
      coping with other grasses.

      No guarantees here, but buckwheat is so much fun to grow, even if it only
      coexists with the other grass, it will reward you. Unlike soy and mung
      beans--which can tolerate a little shade-- buckwheat needs strong, direct
      sunlight; my only crop failures with buckwheat have come from planting it
      too much in the shade.

      Sheer fancy (not a shred of evidence) suggests that another tack might be to
      try plants with tenacious horizonal roots, such as horsetail reeds
      (equisetum) or bamboos, or horizonally-growing underground herbs like ginger
      and tumeric, to see if they crowd out the bermuda in the subterranean
      depths of your garden. If the horizonal group is able to take hold, it
      should be easier to control than the grass was. Horsetail, because it has
      very definite rope-like roots, can be satisfactorily pulled up, root and
      branch. Bamboo growth can be controlled by wedges available from bamboo
      specialty shops. Of course, your dry climate may not support this
      "solution" beyond the level of pure imagination.
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