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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Sunlight

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  • Sumant Joshi
    Well, looks like I have done something for once. I have been using raw red soil for potting my plants. What I did was, I bought large 20 litre plastic drums
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 31 7:53 AM
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      Well, looks like I have done something for once. I have been using raw red soil for potting my plants. What I did was, I bought large 20 litre plastic drums and filled a quarter of each with kitchen waste, then I filled another half with red soil and planted trees. Now I am feeding kitchen waste by just putting it in the pot to cover the soil. The idea is to utilize the entire kitchen waste (vegetable peels, cuttings etc. and sometimes waste food) in my balcony. Right now I have about twelve drums working. one advantage is that I don't have to water every day.
      Once I had the scaly bug attack and I took some chilli powder, added water and doused them with it. They seemed to go away. Organic pesticide!!


      Sent from my BSNL landline B-fone

      Warm regards,

      Sumant Joshi
      Tel - 09370010424, 0253-2361161

      --- On Thu, 31/3/11, Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...> wrote:

      From: Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...>
      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Sunlight
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, 31 March, 2011, 7:40 PM

      Dear Daniel and BV,
        Thanks. The soil I used was red clay with a little mix of manure, that was
      sold specifically for gardens. Some pots had soil undisturbed for years.
      Plants growing in both got infected. Actually it started from the chilli
      plant in the older pot. Watering is done when the plants are wilting. The
      temperatures here are close to 38 C. Soon will cross 40s. Pots are
      terracota.

      Rain is not just water. It is life. It is a miracle. I witnessed it. Once we
      transplanted a tulsi(holy basil) plant and it just never responded to water
      and wilted badly for three days. That night it rained. Next morning the
      plant was in full health and no looking back since then. Another time, some
      seeds we planted never sprouted after many days of watering, until a small
      rain injected life into them.


      Best Regards
      Yugandhar

      On Thu, Mar 31, 2011 at 4:58 PM, Daniel <dfjager@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > You most probably used potting soil in your pots and watered too often. My
      > mistake when first growing anything in pots too.
      >
      > Most plants in the tropics are used to very little organic matter. Most
      > potting soil is 100% organic matter. It stays too wet, and after a while the
      > deeper roots start to die off due to rot. Then the bugs come. Usually the
      > white scaly bugs like you describe.
      >
      > Try uprooting some of your plants and smell the soil at the bottom of the
      > pot. Will probably smell awful.
      > I usually use a 1 in 5 mix of dark potting soil and sand in my pots. Makes
      > the pots much heavier, but it helps drainage and greatly improves plant
      > vigor (for my plants at least)
      >
      > It could also be your pots. Terracotta pots are always better than plastic
      > pots, since terracotta can 'breathe'.
      >
      > Another problem is irrigation. no matter what I tried, my plants always
      > showed instantly the difference between real rainwater and irrigated water.
      > When irrigating it is always difficult to get it just right.
      >
      > I had plants in pots that did very poorly in the dry-season in Thailand,
      > both in full sunlight or shade, and yet when the rainy season came and the
      > soil inside the pots was continuously soaked for 5 months straight, all
      > plants were full of vigor and health.
      >
      > I think it is not a problem of sunlight, since all the plants you describe
      > would have grown wild in the (tropical) understory, and therefore are
      > shade-loving plants (even though most of us grow them erroneously in full
      > sun to stress them into producing more fruit).
      >
      > These at least are my experiences. Hope it helps.
      >
      > Daniel
      >
      >
      > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Dear All,
      > > I have been doing(or not doing) some experiments lately. We planted
      > > various plants like chilli, tomato, onions, okra(bernard pebble
      > > garden),methi, coriander etc few months ago in pots and placed them in
      > our
      > > balcony. I mulched almost all pots with rice straw obtained from a gift
      > > shop. I believe the straw came from the recent flood damaged crop of
      > Andhra
      > > and all the rice seedlings sprouted. So all pots had rice plants as well.
      > > All of them came up well. Everyone of them flowered and bore fruit. After
      > > some time the chilli was attacked by a 'sap sucking' insect. These are
      > white
      > > growing upto 5 mm in size and having a powdery scaly covering and oval in
      > > shape. We just watched. Slowly they stunted the growth of the fruit,
      > killed
      > > the flowers and the plants. They spread to almost all the plants, except
      > > mint, tulsi and some others. Now all the plants are dying.
      > >
      > > I observed that my balcony does not get a full day's sun, which is
      > stunting
      > > the growth of plants and giving rise to pests.
      > >
      > > But, *how do plants flourish in dense rain forests where sunlight barely
      > > penetrates the canopy*?
      > >
      > > Best Regards
      > > Yugandhar
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >

      >


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