Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: medicinal herbs

Expand Messages
  • Judy Phillips
    Hi all--busy seed harvesting and doing garden work the past few weeks so I have not responded to many posts. But I did want to jump in on the topic of using
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 30, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all--busy seed harvesting and doing garden work the past few weeks so I
      have not responded to many posts. But I did want to jump in on the topic of
      using medicinal herbs in the seedball mix. Actually this is my main passion
      and focus in my seed harvesting and redistribution. I think these plants are
      healing not only for us but for the earth. I haven't the time to go into an
      extended or well-researched essay at the moment, though I would like to
      submit an article of this nature to the website when life slows down a bit.
      Yes, gathering the healing herbs does require patience and helps us to
      cultivate a better understanding of our bodies' needs as well as the
      enviroments' needs--intuition tells me "as above, so below" The process of
      learning to identify and cultivate the wildlings, the beneficial healing
      plants has been the most important part of the process for me. Just being
      with these plants makes me a healthier person.
      Collecting their seeds has put me in touch with a whole new part of the life
      cycle--rebirth. Plants are no longer "dead" to me once their blooms have
      faded or their fruits are harvested. Now I pay close attention to their
      survival strategies, I see the process to fruition. The diversity is truly
      inspiring.
      On a less metaphysical track--when I see the number of birds, bees,
      butterflies, hummingbirds and other beneficial insects these plants attract
      to my garden, I know that I am doing the right thing. When I see the worn
      out soil growing richer year after year, I am rewarded. And when I am just
      too plain lazy to weed, I feel less guilty! I am a lousy vegetable gardener,
      truth be told, but a great forager! My spinach harvest was minimal this
      year, but there has never been any lack of lambsquarters volunteers to go
      into the pot.
      In addition to their nourishing values, many of these plants also act as
      great "foils" for predatory insects. I seldom experience mass attacks of
      destructive insect populations now that I mix my herbs, wild and
      domesticated plants in the garden.
      Green Blessings
      Judy

      > Knowing Fukuoka, it probably is the gathering, just as for Henry Thoreau,
      it was the "sauntering."
      > Bob Monie
      >
      > "J. P." wrote:>>> He says that gathering the "seven herbs of spring"
      (watercress,
      > shepherd's purse, wild turnip, cottonweed, chickweed, wild radish, and bee
      > nettle) will make a person gentle.
      >
      > this part had me chuckling - is it the gathering process, or the
      consumption
      > that brings on the gentleness LOL! because those are such little plants!
      > one must cultivate patience!
      >
      > Joanne
      > Los Angeles
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.