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translated Raju Titus post on soil fertility

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  • seaseal
    Dear Sumant Joshi. RE the remarks of Raju Titus you translated: Most people in NF are of the opinion that it is the artificial fertilizers and pesticides which
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 4 9:22 AM
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      Dear Sumant Joshi.

      RE the remarks of Raju Titus you translated: Most people in NF are of the opinion that it is the artificial fertilizers and pesticides which cause the land to degrade and if we remove these, it should be enough to improve it. …when we till the land, it causes the soil to become like a fine paste during rains which prevents water percolating into the soil. Ergo, it just flows away and takes with it tons of good natural fertile soil. … they neither have good natural fertilizer and nor do they have water. …In NF there is no violence whereas in till based farming there is violence against the micro-organisms living in the soil. …Warm regards, Sumant Joshi

      I am a retired teacher in the U.S.A. who has returned to college to study Horticulture. I also use worm compost bins to compost all food waste from a local soup kitchen that feeds about 150 people a day. I get about 40-100 pounds of food scraps like melon rinds, potato peels and waste (uneaten food from people's plates) a day. My chickens eat much of that. Everything left over goes into the worm bin compost.

      I liked what you said about no-till Natural Farming. It is especially important to realize artificial fertilizers and pesticides will kill not only micro soil organisms but will kill all earthworms also.

      To ensure fertile soil, you must return organic matter (meaning plant-based materials such as leaves, fruit rinds, vegetable scraps) to the soil. When there is sufficient organic matter, it does several things to ensure fertility.
      ---it retains moisture in the soil
      ---it helps the soil microorganisms by feeding them, providing habitat, and keeping the moisture level right for their survival
      ---it provides nutrients to return to plant roots
      ---it prevents erosion.

      My plant materials all go through the worm compost bins (and the chickens), so lots of additional micro organisms are added back to the soil also.

      Without adding sufficient plant materials back into the soil, it becomes as you describe it:

      ---the soil is not fertile
      ---the soil becomes like a fine paste
      ---water does not percolate into the soil
      ---water flows away, carrying the organic plant materials with it
      ---the microorganisms have nothing to live in or eat
      ---without natural organic plant materials, the soil is no longer fertile as microorganisms that transfer nutrients from the soil to the plant roots have died.

      If you would like information on building and maintaining worm compost bins, I can help you. I realize obtaining sufficient plant-based materials might be difficult, but without enough organic materials in your soil, you will continue to see the water flow away and nutrition levels drop.

      In many places, including India, the Americas and Japan, manure is also used to add plant materials back into the soil, but I believe it must be composted first to get the best use of it.

      I hope this helps. It seemed the key part on plant matter was missing from the Raju Titus article posted on the Fukuoka email list.

      Cecile
      seaseal@...

      It rains from under the earth and not from the sky.
      ~ Masanobu Fukuoka
    • Ruthie Aquino
      If I may humbly comment...for I am no expert... Masanobu Fukuoka, without discouraging it, does not promote composting. Maybe that s why you added your last
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 4 1:48 PM
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        If I may humbly comment...for I am no expert...
        Masanobu Fukuoka, without discouraging it, does not promote composting.
        Maybe that's why you added your last line, you thought he did not care about
        plant matter.
        When he reaped his rice and wheat he put the stalks immediately and directly
        back to the field, without chopping them up first.

        best
        RUTHIE

        2011/3/4 seaseal <seaseal@...>

        >
        >
        > Dear Sumant Joshi.
        >
        > RE the remarks of Raju Titus you translated: Most people in NF are of the
        > opinion that it is the artificial fertilizers and pesticides which cause the
        > land to degrade and if we remove these, it should be enough to improve it.
        > �when we till the land, it causes the soil to become like a fine paste
        > during rains which prevents water percolating into the soil. Ergo, it just
        > flows away and takes with it tons of good natural fertile soil. � they
        > neither have good natural fertilizer and nor do they have water. �In NF
        > there is no violence whereas in till based farming there is violence against
        > the micro-organisms living in the soil. �Warm regards, Sumant Joshi
        >
        > I am a retired teacher in the U.S.A. who has returned to college to study
        > Horticulture. I also use worm compost bins to compost all food waste from a
        > local soup kitchen that feeds about 150 people a day. I get about 40-100
        > pounds of food scraps like melon rinds, potato peels and waste (uneaten food
        > from people's plates) a day. My chickens eat much of that. Everything left
        > over goes into the worm bin compost.
        >
        > I liked what you said about no-till Natural Farming. It is especially
        > important to realize artificial fertilizers and pesticides will kill not
        > only micro soil organisms but will kill all earthworms also.
        >
        > To ensure fertile soil, you must return organic matter (meaning plant-based
        > materials such as leaves, fruit rinds, vegetable scraps) to the soil. When
        > there is sufficient organic matter, it does several things to ensure
        > fertility.
        > ---it retains moisture in the soil
        > ---it helps the soil microorganisms by feeding them, providing habitat, and
        > keeping the moisture level right for their survival
        > ---it provides nutrients to return to plant roots
        > ---it prevents erosion.
        >
        > My plant materials all go through the worm compost bins (and the chickens),
        > so lots of additional micro organisms are added back to the soil also.
        >
        > Without adding sufficient plant materials back into the soil, it becomes as
        > you describe it:
        >
        > ---the soil is not fertile
        > ---the soil becomes like a fine paste
        > ---water does not percolate into the soil
        > ---water flows away, carrying the organic plant materials with it
        > ---the microorganisms have nothing to live in or eat
        > ---without natural organic plant materials, the soil is no longer fertile
        > as microorganisms that transfer nutrients from the soil to the plant roots
        > have died.
        >
        > If you would like information on building and maintaining worm compost
        > bins, I can help you. I realize obtaining sufficient plant-based materials
        > might be difficult, but without enough organic materials in your soil, you
        > will continue to see the water flow away and nutrition levels drop.
        >
        > In many places, including India, the Americas and Japan, manure is also
        > used to add plant materials back into the soil, but I believe it must be
        > composted first to get the best use of it.
        >
        > I hope this helps. It seemed the key part on plant matter was missing from
        > the Raju Titus article posted on the Fukuoka email list.
        >
        > Cecile
        > seaseal@...
        >
        > It rains from under the earth and not from the sky.
        > ~ Masanobu Fukuoka
        >
        >
        >


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