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waterwise varieties, was waterwise gardening books

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  • J. P.
    Hi Bob - yes, I had discovered Native seeds/search - in fact I am currently harvesting several of the varieties you named! do you grow those too? my
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 28, 2002
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      Hi Bob -

      yes, I had discovered Native seeds/search - in fact I am currently
      harvesting several of the varieties you named! do you grow those too? my
      tomatillos are coming in, but as I have never grown them before, I will have
      to learn what to do with them. I harvested several varieties of their
      heirloom beans earlier this month, and my kids loved their yuman yellow
      corn. (my kids also love shelling their beans because they are so pretty).
      I have some monster Native American squashes growing right now - some Ha'l
      that is used like zucchini (one squash can feed 8 people) and Mayo Kama.
      also growing their Mexican cilantro. I experimented with amaranth this
      year, and I'd like to try quinoa next year. I'll be trying the espinaca
      this fall, as well as a curcubit their catalog says is grown in fall in
      Mexico. the vadito quelites were a disappontment last yr, so I didn't
      repeat this yr - perhaps I didn't know what care they really wanted.

      but I don't think any of these named varieties would tolerate the
      circumstances described by the original poster, of never watering at all.
      at least, not around here, where we have not a drop of rain from April to
      Oct or Nov. I have to regularly water all the above-named stuff. also, all
      of the above was grown with more traditional layout & maintenance, with
      ideas borrowed from Mel Bartholomew, John Jeavons, Native American 4
      sisters, etc, but not really Fukuoka.

      the thing I discovered in my research was that indigenous peoples around
      here did not do cultivated agriculture - instead, they were pretty
      sophisticated stewards of the wild. thus there are not traditional veggie
      varieties developed for the natural rigors of this area. However, my
      conclusion was that any Fukuoka style garden located here should be based on
      a combo of Native Seeds/Search low water varieties, together with such
      things as the Calif native chia (diff than Native Seeds/Search), and brodea
      (a bulb the Calif Native Americans used to dig). Also, those daikon that
      Fukuoka mentions do *great* here for some strange reason. they are not that
      particular about the water! overstory could include the various native
      Rubus (blackberries) and Elder. We do not have sufficient chill for nuts
      like the Calif native hazel. I have not yet tried Jojoba/goatnut, which is
      not native but may do well here.

      if you have grown any of the Native seeds/search varieties, I'd love to hear
      about your experience.

      Joanne
      Los Angeles
    • GlobalCirclenet
      What bean strains have you worked with, and what results? Wondered if you ve tried tepary beans yet, and how has your amaranth turned out? I d also like to
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 28, 2002
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        What bean strains have you worked with, and what results? Wondered if
        you've tried tepary beans yet, and how has your amaranth turned out? I'd
        also like to hear about anyone doing quinoa.

        paul & barb - on the continental divide
        http://globalcircle.net

        *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

        On 9/28/2002 at 9:34 AM J. P. wrote:

        >Hi Bob -
        >
        >yes, I had discovered Native seeds/search - in fact I am currently
        >harvesting several of the varieties you named! do you grow those too? my
        >tomatillos are coming in, but as I have never grown them before, I will
        >have
        >to learn what to do with them. I harvested several varieties of their
        >heirloom beans earlier this month, and my kids loved their yuman yellow
        >corn. (my kids also love shelling their beans because they are so
        pretty).
        >I have some monster Native American squashes growing right now - some Ha'l
        >that is used like zucchini (one squash can feed 8 people) and Mayo Kama.
        >also growing their Mexican cilantro. I experimented with amaranth this
        >year, and I'd like to try quinoa next year. I'll be trying the espinaca
        >this fall, as well as a curcubit their catalog says is grown in fall in
        >Mexico. the vadito quelites were a disappontment last yr, so I didn't
        >repeat this yr - perhaps I didn't know what care they really wanted.
        >
        >but I don't think any of these named varieties would tolerate the
        >circumstances described by the original poster, of never watering at all.
        >at least, not around here, where we have not a drop of rain from April to
        >Oct or Nov. I have to regularly water all the above-named stuff. also,
        >all
        >of the above was grown with more traditional layout & maintenance, with
        >ideas borrowed from Mel Bartholomew, John Jeavons, Native American 4
        >sisters, etc, but not really Fukuoka.
        >
        >the thing I discovered in my research was that indigenous peoples around
        >here did not do cultivated agriculture - instead, they were pretty
        >sophisticated stewards of the wild. thus there are not traditional veggie
        >varieties developed for the natural rigors of this area. However, my
        >conclusion was that any Fukuoka style garden located here should be based
        >on
        >a combo of Native Seeds/Search low water varieties, together with such
        >things as the Calif native chia (diff than Native Seeds/Search), and
        brodea
        >(a bulb the Calif Native Americans used to dig). Also, those daikon that
        >Fukuoka mentions do *great* here for some strange reason. they are not
        >that
        >particular about the water! overstory could include the various native
        >Rubus (blackberries) and Elder. We do not have sufficient chill for nuts
        >like the Calif native hazel. I have not yet tried Jojoba/goatnut, which
        is
        >not native but may do well here.
        >
        >if you have grown any of the Native seeds/search varieties, I'd love to
        >hear
        >about your experience.
        >
        >Joanne
        >Los Angeles
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        >fukuoka_farming-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • bobm20001
        Joanne from Los Angeles asked if anybody knew what to do with tomatillos. I can recall several San Antonio hosts gleefully serving tomatillos in all sorts of
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 29, 2002
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          Joanne from Los Angeles asked if anybody knew what to do with
          tomatillos.

          I can recall several San Antonio hosts gleefully serving tomatillos
          in all sorts of contexts(including surrounded by lime jello and
          shimmying in the company of other veggies). I never paid much
          attention to how the tomatillos were prepared; I just ate them, but I
          will try to find out for you. I read somewhere that researchers have
          discovered just last year that a variety of "Texas ground cherry" has
          the highest known natural content of lycopene, a carotene now
          figuring prominently in preventive cancer and heart disease research.

          Craig Drehman, organic mulch-style farmer and owner of Redwood City
          Seeds in Redwood, California, has written a little book on the
          Tomatillo family: "Ground Cherries, Husk Tomatoes, and Tomatillos,"
          avilable direclty from him and, I think, on Amazon.co.

          Craig is also the author of several other amusing and practical
          gardening books, including "Companion Plants: Carrots Really Detest
          Tomatoes." This wonderfully contrary one I plan to review soon.

          In a telephone conversation a few years ago, Craig said he was
          following much in the footsteps of Ruth Stout (he didn't mention
          Fukuoka) in doing thick-mulch gardening, and he suggested that I do
          the same. As a "nearly natural" seed resource person he might prove
          as valuable as George Stevens of synergy seeds. Anyone curious can
          investigate at http://www.batnet.com/rwc-seed or just pull
          up "Redwood City Seed Co. on Google.com.

          Larry, some good links from your Fukuoka site would be (as Beatrice
          and Jamie will no doubt agree) the scrumptious selection of organic
          seeds offered in Great Britain and Europe by Terre de Semences at

          http://www.organicseedsonline.co.uk

          or the equivalent French/World site for Terre de Semences Organic
          Seeds. Also in the US

          http://www.synergyseeds.com (George Stevens)and

          http://www.batnet.com/rwc-seed (Craig Dreman)

          and Paul Nabham's NATIVE SEED SEARCH site as well.

          Bob Monie




          --- In fukuoka_farming@y..., "J. P." <jpoy@a...> wrote:
          > Hi Bob -
          >
          > yes, I had discovered Native seeds/search - in fact I am currently
          > harvesting several of the varieties you named! do you grow those
          too? my
          > tomatillos are coming in, but as I have never grown them before, I
          will have
          > to learn what to do with them. I harvested several varieties of
          their
          > heirloom beans earlier this month, and my kids loved their yuman
          yellow
          > corn. (my kids also love shelling their beans because they are so
          pretty).
          > I have some monster Native American squashes growing right now -
          some Ha'l
          > that is used like zucchini (one squash can feed 8 people) and Mayo
          Kama.
          > also growing their Mexican cilantro. I experimented with amaranth
          this
          > year, and I'd like to try quinoa next year. I'll be trying the
          espinaca
          > this fall, as well as a curcubit their catalog says is grown in
          fall in
          > Mexico. the vadito quelites were a disappontment last yr, so I
          didn't
          > repeat this yr - perhaps I didn't know what care they really wanted.
          >
          > but I don't think any of these named varieties would tolerate the
          > circumstances described by the original poster, of never watering
          at all.
          > at least, not around here, where we have not a drop of rain from
          April to
          > Oct or Nov. I have to regularly water all the above-named stuff.
          also, all
          > of the above was grown with more traditional layout & maintenance,
          with
          > ideas borrowed from Mel Bartholomew, John Jeavons, Native American 4
          > sisters, etc, but not really Fukuoka.
          >
          > the thing I discovered in my research was that indigenous peoples
          around
          > here did not do cultivated agriculture - instead, they were pretty
          > sophisticated stewards of the wild. thus there are not traditional
          veggie
          > varieties developed for the natural rigors of this area. However,
          my
          > conclusion was that any Fukuoka style garden located here should be
          based on
          > a combo of Native Seeds/Search low water varieties, together with
          such
          > things as the Calif native chia (diff than Native Seeds/Search),
          and brodea
          > (a bulb the Calif Native Americans used to dig). Also, those
          daikon that
          > Fukuoka mentions do *great* here for some strange reason. they are
          not that
          > particular about the water! overstory could include the various
          native
          > Rubus (blackberries) and Elder. We do not have sufficient chill
          for nuts
          > like the Calif native hazel. I have not yet tried Jojoba/goatnut,
          which is
          > not native but may do well here.
          >
          > if you have grown any of the Native seeds/search varieties, I'd
          love to hear
          > about your experience.
          >
          > Joanne
          > Los Angeles
        • Larry Haftl
          ... .. links not quoted for brevity... Thanks Robert, I ll start a links subsection for seed sources and put these in there. To all.... comeon gang, don t make
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 29, 2002
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            Robert Monie wrote:

            >Larry, some good links from your Fukuoka site would be (as Beatrice
            >and Jamie will no doubt agree) the scrumptious selection of organic
            >seeds offered in Great Britain and Europe by Terre de Semences at

            .. links not quoted for brevity...

            Thanks Robert, I'll start a links subsection for seed sources and
            put these in there.

            To all.... comeon gang, don't make me read through the entire archive
            for useful links...

            And how about keywords...


            Larry Haftl
            larry@...
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