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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

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  • Vishu Shetty
    Hi Nandan, Yes you are right, they are used as cover crops in rubber plantations and there has been studies which show they can be used in coffee plantations
    Message 1 of 19 , Dec 2 8:01 AM
      Hi Nandan,

      Yes you are right, they are used as cover crops in rubber plantations and
      there has been studies which show they can be used in coffee plantations as
      well. However, it is not a widely established practice and I want to
      experiment at a small patch of land to start with.

      I also came across covercrops.org while googling and have written to them
      but have not received a reply from them. Thanks for
      your help, Much appreciated. I will get in touch with you offline.

      I have also been contacted from one member of this forum who is also a
      supplier of cover crop seeds about the availability of the seeds in the
      month of Jan. I need to write to him with my requirement.


      On Thu, Dec 2, 2010 at 9:49 AM, Nandan Palaparambil
      <p_k_nandanan@...>wrote:

      >
      >
      > Hi Vishu,
      >
      > I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks
      > like the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is
      > grown in the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and
      > will look like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade
      > establishes, this will go by itself. One person recently told me, when the
      > trees are cut after a period of 25 years (typically), they come back again,
      > they just remain in the soil for so many years.
      >
      > Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -
      > http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur,
      > if you need any help I can provide that.
      >
      > Regards,
      > Nandan
      >
      > --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...<magicblack%40gmail.com>>
      > wrote:
      >
      > From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <magicblack%40gmail.com>>
      > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
      > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Dear All,
      >
      > Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use
      >
      > it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live
      >
      > mulch.
      >
      > I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in
      >
      > coffee plantation.
      >
      > --
      >
      > Vishu
      >
      > http://titli.bikingvikings.com
      >
      > The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Vishu

      http://titli.bikingvikings.com

      The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Anant Joglekar
      Hi friends ! Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135 Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land
      Message 2 of 19 , Dec 2 5:45 PM
        Hi friends !

        Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135
        Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since 1995.My
        lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a minor
        irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop within
        Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage
        Eucalyptus.

        I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which will
        control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of soil and
        stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest some
        live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.

        I request advice, suggestions from the group please.

        Thanks and regards.

        Anant Joglekar
        919423089706


        Sent with Best Compliments -
        Call me at-
        +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724
        Post me at-
        Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose
        Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001

        Meet me at-
        yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro

        BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC





        ________________________________
        From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM
        Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica


        Hi Vishu,

        I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks like
        the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown in
        the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will look
        like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this will go
        by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a period of
        25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil for so
        many years.

        Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -
        http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur, if you
        need any help I can provide that.

        Regards,
        Nandan

        --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...> wrote:

        From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...>
        Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM



        Dear All,

        Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use

        it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live

        mulch.

        I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in

        coffee plantation.

        --

        Vishu

        http://titli.bikingvikings.com

        The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Linda Shewan
        Hi Anant, I am interested in why you chose eucalypts? Are they native to your area? I ask because eucalypts are known for ‘raping’ a landscape – they
        Message 3 of 19 , Dec 2 8:40 PM
          Hi Anant,



          I am interested in why you chose eucalypts? Are they native to your area?



          I ask because eucalypts are known for ‘raping’ a landscape – they destroy the soil, suck up ALL the water and prohibit anything else from growing in their root zone and wherever the leaves land – I know this from personal experience because I have tried to garden close to them and it doesn’t matter how much compost or mulch you put on an area the eucalypts turn it to sand in no time at all... and it sucks all the water from below as you are watering from above – impossible!



          Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia becomes more and more arid...



          Just interested, I know they have their benefits too, particularly for building!



          For live fencing you will want a really thick thorny hedge like barberry or hawthorn (or preferably a native equivalent) around the perimeter to keep out the cattle – but you will need to fence for a few years as they grow. Once you have fenced of course your options for cover crops increase exponentially. I wouldn’t worry about weeds – most of them are GOOD and bring up nutrients from the subsoil which then adds the nutrients to the topsoil as they die and decompose... it’s all in the mind!



          Do you have plenty of water year round – if so then you should be able to get perennial crops growing under them – the ones next door here have climbers like honeysuckle around them and blackberries seem to do well too – they are at the bottom of a slope so get all the nutrient and water from an acre or so above them though... Blackberries will also deter the wild animals and you will get food as well – all good! But they will grow faster than the eucalypts and may smother them – not so good! If you plant them a fair distance away from the trees then they might work. They won’t add to the soil though!





          Good luck, Linda





          From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Anant Joglekar
          Sent: Friday, 3 December 2010 12:45 PM
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: Nandan Palaparambil
          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica





          Hi friends !

          Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135
          Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since 1995.My
          lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a minor
          irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop within
          Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage
          Eucalyptus.

          I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which will
          control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of soil and
          stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest some
          live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.

          I request advice, suggestions from the group please.

          Thanks and regards.

          Anant Joglekar
          919423089706

          Sent with Best Compliments -
          Call me at-
          +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724
          Post me at-
          Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose
          Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001

          Meet me at-
          yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro

          BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC

          ________________________________
          From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@... <mailto:p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com> >
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM
          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

          Hi Vishu,

          I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks like
          the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown in
          the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will look
          like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this will go
          by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a period of
          25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil for so
          many years.

          Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -
          http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur, if you
          need any help I can provide that.

          Regards,
          Nandan

          --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> > wrote:

          From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> >
          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM

          Dear All,

          Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use

          it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live

          mulch.

          I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in

          coffee plantation.

          --

          Vishu

          http://titli.bikingvikings.com

          The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jason Stewart
          Dear Anant Joglekar, Writing this from the land of the native Eucalypts (about 600 species native) Australia, :) , i write: Please list the names of any plants
          Message 4 of 19 , Dec 2 9:28 PM
            Dear Anant Joglekar,

            Writing this from the land of the native Eucalypts (about 600 species native)
            Australia, :) , i write:
            Please list the names of any plants growing around the area there, any names you
            have including Indian local common names, of any possible suitable plants such
            as grasses, shrubs, legumes and spiny plants for the live fencing.

            I have the name of Cockspur Thorn –botanical name:
            "_Maclura_cochinchinensis_ (Lour.) Corner" of India and of Australia and China.
            A very spiny woody big spreading shrub &/or vine, with edible ripe orange
            fruits. It naturally grows in forests (dry & wet rainforests, & wet Eucalypt
            forests) in warm temperate and subtropical south and eastern Australia (NSW &
            QLD).

            -> http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Cockspur%20Thorn.htmlMore photos
            in Australia:

            -> http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Maclura~cochinchinensis-> http://www.rainforestpublishing.com.au/index.php?href=botanical&dir=botanical_pages&subpage=view&ext=php&array_place=13&item_id=533#image_533

            ( http://www.rainforestpublishing.com.au/botanical_images/Maclura%20cochinchinensis%209.jpg )

            -> http://www.flickr.com/photos/blackdiamondimages/4205370259/in/photostream/
            -> http://toowoombaplants2008.blogspot.com/2008/02/cockspur-thorn.html

            -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


            Any leguminous nitrogen fixing species please list, we all may each have some
            pieces of encouraging information about a list of your local species, if you
            need to please ask local people and local farmers the local plant species.

            Eucalypts (from Australia) can produce unusual environments underneath their
            trees, from the leaf oils, and from the root symbiotic relationships, root
            chemicals and environments made by the roots. Unusual elsewhere in the world.
            Here in Australia there are many endemic species of plants long adapted growing
            in these Eucalypt environments, above-ground and in the root zone (adapted
            meaning revolved sensu Mr. Fukuoka instead of evolved sensu science, long
            meaning over millions of years).


            Best wishes to all,
            Jase
            (Jason Stewart)
            south-eastern Australia



            ________________________________
            From: Anant Joglekar <apjoglekar@...>
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
            Sent: Friday, December 3, 2010 12:45:18
            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica


            Hi friends !

            Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135

            Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since 1995.My
            lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a minor
            irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop within
            Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage
            Eucalyptus.

            I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which will
            control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of soil and

            stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest some
            live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.

            I request advice, suggestions from the group please.

            Thanks and regards.

            Anant Joglekar
            919423089706

            Sent with Best Compliments -
            Call me at-
            +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724
            Post me at-
            Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose
            Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001

            Meet me at-
            yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro

            BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC

            ________________________________
            From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM
            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

            Hi Vishu,

            I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks like

            the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown in
            the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will look
            like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this will go

            by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a period of

            25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil for so
            many years.

            Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -
            http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur, if you

            need any help I can provide that.

            Regards,
            Nandan

            --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...> wrote:

            From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...>
            Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM

            Dear All,

            Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use

            it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live

            mulch.

            I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in

            coffee plantation.

            --

            Vishu

            http://titli.bikingvikings.com

            The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jason Stewart
            Dear friend Linda, Peter Andrews half talks realistically (especially his great realisation writings about stream and half talks incoherent claptrap (i m not
            Message 5 of 19 , Dec 2 11:07 PM
              Dear friend Linda,

              Peter Andrews half talks realistically (especially his great realisation
              writings about stream and half talks incoherent claptrap (i'm not sure which of
              perceptions prejudices, ethnocentric-biases, emotions, feelings, plain errors or
              what).
              Popularity which he has, and appearance of credibility which latterly he now
              has, amongst many but far from all people, does not reality—make!
              We all humanly make errors, do sloppy work lacking rigour, we all err –anyone
              who says "humans are rational" is definitely irrational–
              We all have emotions feelings & perceptions, it depends what we do with our
              intellectual-side to our emotions to re-direct them and their energy into
              expression(s) which are beneficial to all, if not also perhaps-accidentally
              expressing so called rationality –much vaunted by Richard Dawkins whose memes
              work, for one of many examples, definitively is irrational.

              Futhermore, Linda this your wording cant sustain scrutiny: "eucalypts are known
              for ‘raping’ a landscape – they destroy the soil, suck up ALL the water" – nor
              have you referenced. I'm happy if you merely qualify it as your feelings.
              Because it is not evidence based... .


              Best wishes to you & all,

              Jase
              Jason Stewart
              south-eastern Oz

              ________________________________
              From: Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...>
              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, December 3, 2010 15:40:50
              Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] Eucalypts


              Hi Anant,

              I am interested in why you chose eucalypts? Are they native to your area?

              I ask because eucalypts are known for ‘raping’ a landscape – they destroy the
              soil, suck up ALL the water and prohibit anything else from growing in their
              root zone and wherever the leaves land – I know this from personal experience
              because I have tried to garden close to them and it doesn’t matter how much
              compost or mulch you put on an area the eucalypts turn it to sand in no time at
              all... and it sucks all the water from below as you are watering from above –
              impossible!

              Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are 80%
              (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia becomes more
              and more arid...

              Just interested, I know they have their benefits too, particularly for building!

              For live fencing you will want a really thick thorny hedge like barberry or
              hawthorn (or preferably a native equivalent) around the perimeter to keep out
              the cattle – but you will need to fence for a few years as they grow. Once you
              have fenced of course your options for cover crops increase exponentially. I
              wouldn’t worry about weeds – most of them are GOOD and bring up nutrients from
              the subsoil which then adds the nutrients to the topsoil as they die and
              decompose... it’s all in the mind!

              Do you have plenty of water year round – if so then you should be able to get
              perennial crops growing under them – the ones next door here have climbers like
              honeysuckle around them and blackberries seem to do well too – they are at the
              bottom of a slope so get all the nutrient and water from an acre or so above
              them though... Blackberries will also deter the wild animals and you will get
              food as well – all good! But they will grow faster than the eucalypts and may
              smother them – not so good! If you plant them a fair distance away from the
              trees then they might work. They won’t add to the soil though!

              Good luck, Linda

              From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of Anant Joglekar
              Sent: Friday, 3 December 2010 12:45 PM
              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: Nandan Palaparambil
              Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

              Hi friends !

              Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135

              Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since 1995.My
              lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a minor
              irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop within
              Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage
              Eucalyptus.

              I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which will
              control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of soil and

              stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest some
              live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.

              I request advice, suggestions from the group please.

              Thanks and regards.

              Anant Joglekar
              919423089706

              Sent with Best Compliments -
              Call me at-
              +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724
              Post me at-
              Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose
              Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001

              Meet me at-
              yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro

              BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC

              ________________________________
              From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...
              <mailto:p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com> >
              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM
              Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

              Hi Vishu,

              I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks like

              the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown in
              the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will look
              like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this will go

              by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a period of

              25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil for so
              many years.

              Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -
              http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur, if you

              need any help I can provide that.

              Regards,
              Nandan

              --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...
              <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> > wrote:

              From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> >
              Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
              To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
              Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM

              Dear All,

              Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use

              it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live

              mulch.

              I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in

              coffee plantation.

              --

              Vishu

              http://titli.bikingvikings.com

              The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • yajnesh shetty
              Hello Anant, For live fencing Caesalpinia bonducella(fever nut/gacchakaya/sagargota) is supposed to be very good.They claim that it forms an impenetrable
              Message 6 of 19 , Dec 3 1:19 AM
                Hello Anant,
                For live fencing Caesalpinia bonducella(fever nut/gacchakaya/sagargota) is supposed to be very good.They claim that it forms an impenetrable barrier at 2 years if planted at  distances of 3 feet between each sapling or seed.
                                                                                     Regards,
                                                                                         Yaj.



                Hi friends !



                Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135



                Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since 1995.My

                lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a minor

                irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop within

                Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage

                Eucalyptus.



                I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which will

                control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of soil and



                stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest some

                live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.



                I request advice, suggestions from the group please.



                Thanks and regards.



                Anant Joglekar

                919423089706



                Sent with Best Compliments -

                Call me at-

                +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724

                Post me at-

                Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose

                Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001



                Meet me at-

                yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro



                BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC



                ________________________________

                From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...

                <mailto:p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com> >

                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>

                Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM

                Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica



                Hi Vishu,



                I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks like



                the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown in

                the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will look

                like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this will go



                by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a period of



                25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil for so

                many years.



                Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -

                http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur, if you



                need any help I can provide that.



                Regards,

                Nandan



                --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...

                <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> > wrote:



                From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> >

                Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>

                Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM



                Dear All,



                Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use



                it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live



                mulch.



                I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in



                coffee plantation.



                --



                Vishu



                http://titli.bikingvikings.com



                The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






















                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • vivasayee vivasayee
                Hi Mr Anant ,Having association to natural farming ,As ucalyptus is non environment friendly never recommended as it has the capability to deplete the water
                Message 7 of 19 , Dec 3 6:55 AM
                  Hi Mr Anant ,Having association to natural farming ,As ucalyptus is non
                  environment friendly never recommended as it has the capability to deplete
                  the water source as linda explained detail about..There are many cash crops
                  you could think of as 90 acres is huge impact to the surroundings ...

                  If you want some thing to do for the environment and world ..think twice
                  whether to have this plant in ur field irrespective of its unfriendly
                  nature to environment ...

                  Regards
                  vivasayee

                  On Fri, Dec 3, 2010 at 8:40 AM, Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...>wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  > Hi Anant,
                  >
                  > I am interested in why you chose eucalypts? Are they native to your area?
                  >
                  > I ask because eucalypts are known for �raping� a landscape � they destroy
                  > the soil, suck up ALL the water and prohibit anything else from growing in
                  > their root zone and wherever the leaves land � I know this from personal
                  > experience because I have tried to garden close to them and it doesn�t
                  > matter how much compost or mulch you put on an area the eucalypts turn it to
                  > sand in no time at all... and it sucks all the water from below as you are
                  > watering from above � impossible!
                  >
                  > Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are
                  > 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia becomes
                  > more and more arid...
                  >
                  > Just interested, I know they have their benefits too, particularly for
                  > building!
                  >
                  > For live fencing you will want a really thick thorny hedge like barberry or
                  > hawthorn (or preferably a native equivalent) around the perimeter to keep
                  > out the cattle � but you will need to fence for a few years as they grow.
                  > Once you have fenced of course your options for cover crops increase
                  > exponentially. I wouldn�t worry about weeds � most of them are GOOD and
                  > bring up nutrients from the subsoil which then adds the nutrients to the
                  > topsoil as they die and decompose... it�s all in the mind!
                  >
                  > Do you have plenty of water year round � if so then you should be able to
                  > get perennial crops growing under them � the ones next door here have
                  > climbers like honeysuckle around them and blackberries seem to do well too �
                  > they are at the bottom of a slope so get all the nutrient and water from an
                  > acre or so above them though... Blackberries will also deter the wild
                  > animals and you will get food as well � all good! But they will grow faster
                  > than the eucalypts and may smother them � not so good! If you plant them a
                  > fair distance away from the trees then they might work. They won�t add to
                  > the soil though!
                  >
                  > Good luck, Linda
                  >
                  > From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>[mailto:
                  > fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                  > Behalf Of Anant Joglekar
                  > Sent: Friday, 3 December 2010 12:45 PM
                  > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > Cc: Nandan Palaparambil
                  > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                  >
                  > Hi friends !
                  >
                  > Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out
                  > of 135
                  > Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since
                  > 1995.My
                  > lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a
                  > minor
                  > irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop
                  > within
                  > Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage
                  > Eucalyptus.
                  >
                  > I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which
                  > will
                  > control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of
                  > soil and
                  > stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest
                  > some
                  > live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.
                  >
                  > I request advice, suggestions from the group please.
                  >
                  > Thanks and regards.
                  >
                  > Anant Joglekar
                  > 919423089706
                  >
                  > Sent with Best Compliments -
                  > Call me at-
                  > +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724
                  > Post me at-
                  > Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose
                  > Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001
                  >
                  > Meet me at-
                  > yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro
                  >
                  > BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...<p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com><mailto:
                  > p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com <p_k_nandanan%2540yahoo.com>> >
                  > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com><mailto:
                  > fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%2540yahoogroups.com>>
                  > Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM
                  > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                  >
                  > Hi Vishu,
                  >
                  > I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks
                  > like
                  > the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown
                  > in
                  > the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will
                  > look
                  > like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this
                  > will go
                  > by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a
                  > period of
                  > 25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil
                  > for so
                  > many years.
                  >
                  > Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -
                  > http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur,
                  > if you
                  > need any help I can provide that.
                  >
                  > Regards,
                  > Nandan
                  >
                  > --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...<magicblack%40gmail.com><mailto:
                  > magicblack%40gmail.com <magicblack%2540gmail.com>> > wrote:
                  >
                  > From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <magicblack%40gmail.com> <mailto:
                  > magicblack%40gmail.com <magicblack%2540gmail.com>> >
                  > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                  > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com><mailto:
                  > fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%2540yahoogroups.com>>
                  > Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM
                  >
                  > Dear All,
                  >
                  > Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use
                  >
                  > it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live
                  >
                  > mulch.
                  >
                  > I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in
                  >
                  > coffee plantation.
                  >
                  > --
                  >
                  > Vishu
                  >
                  > http://titli.bikingvikings.com
                  >
                  > The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Nandan Palaparambil
                  Recently visited santhosh farms in Pollachi which is 50 acres and has a mix of coconut, mango trees, teak and many more. He has used Palmyra palm tree as live
                  Message 8 of 19 , Dec 3 8:25 AM
                    Recently visited santhosh farms in Pollachi which is 50 acres and has a mix of coconut, mango trees, teak and many more.

                    He has used Palmyra palm tree as live fence since he wanted to block elephants coming to farm from nearby forest.This tree is really strong and uprooting is not easy. I have seen people using Pathimukham (Caesalpenia sappan) which has thorns and has good medicinal values. I use gliricidia which gives lot of mulching material..

                    Dr.Nammalvar is an expert in live fencing and you can contact him for guidance.



                    Regards,
                    Nandan

                    --- On Fri, 12/3/10, vivasayee vivasayee <vivasayeee@...> wrote:

                    From: vivasayee vivasayee <vivasayeee@...>
                    Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Eucalypts
                    To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Friday, December 3, 2010, 8:25 PM

                    Hi Mr Anant ,Having association to natural farming ,As ucalyptus is non
                    environment friendly never recommended as it has the capability to deplete
                    the water source as linda explained detail about..There are many cash crops
                    you could think of as 90 acres is huge impact to the surroundings ...

                    If you want some thing to do for the environment and world ..think twice
                    whether to have this plant in ur field  irrespective of its unfriendly
                    nature to environment ...

                    Regards
                    vivasayee

                    On Fri, Dec 3, 2010 at 8:40 AM, Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...>wrote:

                    >
                    >
                    > Hi Anant,
                    >
                    > I am interested in why you chose eucalypts? Are they native to your area?
                    >
                    > I ask because eucalypts are known for ‘raping’ a landscape – they destroy
                    > the soil, suck up ALL the water and prohibit anything else from growing in
                    > their root zone and wherever the leaves land – I know this from personal
                    > experience because I have tried to garden close to them and it doesn’t
                    > matter how much compost or mulch you put on an area the eucalypts turn it to
                    > sand in no time at all... and it sucks all the water from below as you are
                    > watering from above – impossible!
                    >
                    > Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are
                    > 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia becomes
                    > more and more arid...
                    >
                    > Just interested, I know they have their benefits too, particularly for
                    > building!
                    >
                    > For live fencing you will want a really thick thorny hedge like barberry or
                    > hawthorn (or preferably a native equivalent) around the perimeter to keep
                    > out the cattle – but you will need to fence for a few years as they grow.
                    > Once you have fenced of course your options for cover crops increase
                    > exponentially. I wouldn’t worry about weeds – most of them are GOOD and
                    > bring up nutrients from the subsoil which then adds the nutrients to the
                    > topsoil as they die and decompose... it’s all in the mind!
                    >
                    > Do you have plenty of water year round – if so then you should be able to
                    > get perennial crops growing under them – the ones next door here have
                    > climbers like honeysuckle around them and blackberries seem to do well too –
                    > they are at the bottom of a slope so get all the nutrient and water from an
                    > acre or so above them though... Blackberries will also deter the wild
                    > animals and you will get food as well – all good! But they will grow faster
                    > than the eucalypts and may smother them – not so good! If you plant them a
                    > fair distance away from the trees then they might work. They won’t add to
                    > the soil though!
                    >
                    > Good luck, Linda
                    >
                    > From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>[mailto:
                    > fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                    > Behalf Of Anant Joglekar
                    > Sent: Friday, 3 December 2010 12:45 PM
                    > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
                    > Cc: Nandan Palaparambil
                    > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                    >
                    > Hi friends !
                    >
                    > Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out
                    > of 135
                    > Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since
                    > 1995.My
                    > lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a
                    > minor
                    > irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop
                    > within
                    > Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage
                    > Eucalyptus.
                    >
                    > I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which
                    > will
                    > control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of
                    > soil and
                    > stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest
                    > some
                    > live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.
                    >
                    > I request advice, suggestions from the group please.
                    >
                    > Thanks and regards.
                    >
                    > Anant Joglekar
                    > 919423089706
                    >
                    > Sent with Best Compliments -
                    > Call me at-
                    > +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724
                    > Post me at-
                    > Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose
                    > Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001
                    >
                    > Meet me at-
                    > yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro
                    >
                    > BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...<p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com><mailto:
                    > p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com <p_k_nandanan%2540yahoo.com>> >
                    > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com><mailto:
                    > fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%2540yahoogroups.com>>
                    > Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM
                    > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                    >
                    > Hi Vishu,
                    >
                    > I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks
                    > like
                    > the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown
                    > in
                    > the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will
                    > look
                    > like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this
                    > will go
                    > by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a
                    > period of
                    > 25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil
                    > for so
                    > many years.
                    >
                    > Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -
                    > http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur,
                    > if you
                    > need any help I can provide that.
                    >
                    > Regards,
                    > Nandan
                    >
                    > --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...<magicblack%40gmail.com><mailto:
                    > magicblack%40gmail.com <magicblack%2540gmail.com>> > wrote:
                    >
                    > From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <magicblack%40gmail.com> <mailto:
                    > magicblack%40gmail.com <magicblack%2540gmail.com>> >
                    > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                    > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com><mailto:
                    > fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%2540yahoogroups.com>>
                    > Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM
                    >
                    > Dear All,
                    >
                    > Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use
                    >
                    > it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live
                    >
                    > mulch.
                    >
                    > I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in
                    >
                    > coffee plantation.
                    >
                    > --
                    >
                    > Vishu
                    >
                    > http://titli.bikingvikings.com
                    >
                    > The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                    ------------------------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links








                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Nandan Palaparambil
                    Linda, Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia becomes
                    Message 9 of 19 , Dec 3 8:31 AM
                      Linda,


                      Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they
                      are 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia
                      becomes more and more arid...


                      Is  Eucalypts spreading by its own or people are planting it? Does goverment do anything about spreading Eucalypts and acacias? Just eager how things work in your part of world.


                      Regards,
                      Nandan

                      --- On Fri, 12/3/10, Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...> wrote:

                      From: Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...>
                      Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] Eucalypts
                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Friday, December 3, 2010, 10:10 AM







                       









                      Hi Anant,



                      I am interested in why you chose eucalypts? Are they native to your area?



                      I ask because eucalypts are known for ‘raping’ a landscape – they destroy the soil, suck up ALL the water and prohibit anything else from growing in their root zone and wherever the leaves land – I know this from personal experience because I have tried to garden close to them and it doesn’t matter how much compost or mulch you put on an area the eucalypts turn it to sand in no time at all... and it sucks all the water from below as you are watering from above – impossible!



                      Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia becomes more and more arid...



                      Just interested, I know they have their benefits too, particularly for building!



                      For live fencing you will want a really thick thorny hedge like barberry or hawthorn (or preferably a native equivalent) around the perimeter to keep out the cattle – but you will need to fence for a few years as they grow. Once you have fenced of course your options for cover crops increase exponentially. I wouldn’t worry about weeds – most of them are GOOD and bring up nutrients from the subsoil which then adds the nutrients to the topsoil as they die and decompose... it’s all in the mind!



                      Do you have plenty of water year round – if so then you should be able to get perennial crops growing under them – the ones next door here have climbers like honeysuckle around them and blackberries seem to do well too – they are at the bottom of a slope so get all the nutrient and water from an acre or so above them though... Blackberries will also deter the wild animals and you will get food as well – all good! But they will grow faster than the eucalypts and may smother them – not so good! If you plant them a fair distance away from the trees then they might work. They won’t add to the soil though!



                      Good luck, Linda



                      From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Anant Joglekar

                      Sent: Friday, 3 December 2010 12:45 PM

                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com

                      Cc: Nandan Palaparambil

                      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica



                      Hi friends !



                      Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135

                      Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since 1995.My

                      lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a minor

                      irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop within

                      Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage

                      Eucalyptus.



                      I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which will

                      control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of soil and

                      stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest some

                      live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.



                      I request advice, suggestions from the group please.



                      Thanks and regards.



                      Anant Joglekar

                      919423089706



                      Sent with Best Compliments -

                      Call me at-

                      +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724

                      Post me at-

                      Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose

                      Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001



                      Meet me at-

                      yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro



                      BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC



                      ________________________________

                      From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@... <mailto:p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com> >

                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>

                      Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM

                      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica



                      Hi Vishu,



                      I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks like

                      the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown in

                      the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will look

                      like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this will go

                      by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a period of

                      25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil for so

                      many years.



                      Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -

                      http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur, if you

                      need any help I can provide that.



                      Regards,

                      Nandan



                      --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> > wrote:



                      From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> >

                      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>

                      Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM



                      Dear All,



                      Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use



                      it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live



                      mulch.



                      I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in



                      coffee plantation.



                      --



                      Vishu



                      http://titli.bikingvikings.com



                      The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Raju Titus
                      Dear friend, All bio diversity provided by nature is Eco-friendly. In some cases mono-culture in man made jungles shows some problem can be solved by adding
                      Message 10 of 19 , Dec 3 9:06 PM
                        Dear friend,
                        All bio diversity provided by nature is Eco-friendly. In some cases
                        mono-culture in man made jungles shows some problem can be solved by adding
                        diversity. Subabul with Eucalyptus will solve problem if any.
                        Thanks
                        Raju

                        On Fri, Dec 3, 2010 at 8:25 PM, vivasayee vivasayee <vivasayeee@...>wrote:

                        > Hi Mr Anant ,Having association to natural farming ,As ucalyptus is non
                        > environment friendly never recommended as it has the capability to deplete
                        > the water source as linda explained detail about..There are many cash crops
                        > you could think of as 90 acres is huge impact to the surroundings ...
                        >
                        > If you want some thing to do for the environment and world ..think twice
                        > whether to have this plant in ur field irrespective of its unfriendly
                        > nature to environment ...
                        >
                        > Regards
                        > vivasayee
                        >
                        > On Fri, Dec 3, 2010 at 8:40 AM, Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...
                        > >wrote:
                        >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Hi Anant,
                        > >
                        > > I am interested in why you chose eucalypts? Are they native to your area?
                        > >
                        > > I ask because eucalypts are known for �raping� a landscape � they destroy
                        > > the soil, suck up ALL the water and prohibit anything else from growing
                        > in
                        > > their root zone and wherever the leaves land � I know this from personal
                        > > experience because I have tried to garden close to them and it doesn�t
                        > > matter how much compost or mulch you put on an area the eucalypts turn it
                        > to
                        > > sand in no time at all... and it sucks all the water from below as you
                        > are
                        > > watering from above � impossible!
                        > >
                        > > Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are
                        > > 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia
                        > becomes
                        > > more and more arid...
                        > >
                        > > Just interested, I know they have their benefits too, particularly for
                        > > building!
                        > >
                        > > For live fencing you will want a really thick thorny hedge like barberry
                        > or
                        > > hawthorn (or preferably a native equivalent) around the perimeter to keep
                        > > out the cattle � but you will need to fence for a few years as they grow.
                        > > Once you have fenced of course your options for cover crops increase
                        > > exponentially. I wouldn�t worry about weeds � most of them are GOOD and
                        > > bring up nutrients from the subsoil which then adds the nutrients to the
                        > > topsoil as they die and decompose... it�s all in the mind!
                        > >
                        > > Do you have plenty of water year round � if so then you should be able to
                        > > get perennial crops growing under them � the ones next door here have
                        > > climbers like honeysuckle around them and blackberries seem to do well
                        > too �
                        > > they are at the bottom of a slope so get all the nutrient and water from
                        > an
                        > > acre or so above them though... Blackberries will also deter the wild
                        > > animals and you will get food as well � all good! But they will grow
                        > faster
                        > > than the eucalypts and may smother them � not so good! If you plant them
                        > a
                        > > fair distance away from the trees then they might work. They won�t add to
                        > > the soil though!
                        > >
                        > > Good luck, Linda
                        > >
                        > > From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com
                        > >[mailto:
                        > > fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                        > > Behalf Of Anant Joglekar
                        > > Sent: Friday, 3 December 2010 12:45 PM
                        > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > > Cc: Nandan Palaparambil
                        > > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                        > >
                        > > Hi friends !
                        > >
                        > > Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out
                        > > of 135
                        > > Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since
                        > > 1995.My
                        > > lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a
                        > > minor
                        > > irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop
                        > > within
                        > > Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage
                        > > Eucalyptus.
                        > >
                        > > I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which
                        > > will
                        > > control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of
                        > > soil and
                        > > stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest
                        > > some
                        > > live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.
                        > >
                        > > I request advice, suggestions from the group please.
                        > >
                        > > Thanks and regards.
                        > >
                        > > Anant Joglekar
                        > > 919423089706
                        > >
                        > > Sent with Best Compliments -
                        > > Call me at-
                        > > +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724
                        > > Post me at-
                        > > Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose
                        > > Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001
                        > >
                        > > Meet me at-
                        > > yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro
                        > >
                        > > BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC
                        > >
                        > > ________________________________
                        > > From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...<p_k_nandanan%
                        > 40yahoo.com><mailto:
                        > > p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com <p_k_nandanan%2540yahoo.com>> >
                        > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com
                        > ><mailto:
                        > > fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%2540yahoogroups.com>>
                        > > Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM
                        > > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                        > >
                        > > Hi Vishu,
                        > >
                        > > I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it
                        > looks
                        > > like
                        > > the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is
                        > grown
                        > > in
                        > > the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will
                        > > look
                        > > like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this
                        > > will go
                        > > by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a
                        > > period of
                        > > 25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil
                        > > for so
                        > > many years.
                        > >
                        > > Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -
                        > > http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town
                        > Trichur,
                        > > if you
                        > > need any help I can provide that.
                        > >
                        > > Regards,
                        > > Nandan
                        > >
                        > > --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...<magicblack%
                        > 40gmail.com><mailto:
                        > > magicblack%40gmail.com <magicblack%2540gmail.com>> > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <magicblack%40gmail.com>
                        > <mailto:
                        > > magicblack%40gmail.com <magicblack%2540gmail.com>> >
                        > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                        > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com
                        > ><mailto:
                        > > fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%2540yahoogroups.com>>
                        > > Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM
                        > >
                        > > Dear All,
                        > >
                        > > Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to
                        > use
                        > >
                        > > it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live
                        > >
                        > > mulch.
                        > >
                        > > I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in
                        > >
                        > > coffee plantation.
                        > >
                        > > --
                        > >
                        > > Vishu
                        > >
                        > > http://titli.bikingvikings.com
                        > >
                        > > The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it
                        > happens
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        --
                        Raju Titus. Hoshangabad. 461001.India.
                        +919179738049.
                        http://picasaweb.google.com/rajuktitus<http://picasawebalbum.google.com/rajuktitus>
                        fukuoka_farming yahoogroup


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Jason Stewart
                        Dear Nandan, and all, This is my natural heartfelt work all my life, my part of the world (too), Australia, especially Melbourne, far-east gippsland farming
                        Message 11 of 19 , Dec 3 9:08 PM
                          Dear Nandan, and all,

                          This is my natural heartfelt work all my life, my part of the world (too),
                          Australia, especially Melbourne, far-east gippsland farming rural areas,
                          Victoria, Sydney, rural areas, NSW, ACT (Canberra & rural arras) and my
                          professional–natural–work for all and sundry (local state & federal gov't's,
                          voluntarily for communities including Aborigines' communities, companies,
                          farmers, landcare, bushcare, Royal Melb. Golf Club, etc.).
                          The authority & credibility, i have (without ego as best as i can), to say that
                          that is complete nonsense and must not get taken any further PLEASE! -quote:
                          "Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are 80%
                          (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia

                          becomes more and more arid..."

                          It's an extreme misrepresentation of ancient Australian geology, palaeobotany,
                          palynology and so on, poorly derived by Peter Andrews that i've read of his
                          writing, —evidently i understand this ancient Australian geology, palaeobotany,
                          palynology better than Peter Andrews does—i suppose because i have, in
                          privileges, been trained in it properly in University—
                          –deriving from taken completely out of context, 65 million (65,000,000) and more
                          years ago—Gondwanaland at the south pole— when Dinosaurs roamed the Earth and
                          most Angiosperm plants hadn't revolved yet (sensu late Mr.
                          Fukuoka<=evolved)—when the Himalaya's, according to geology, didnt exist yet,
                          and when India was not yet India but rather an subcontinent-sized island, north
                          of Antarctica, moving centimetres north per year towards continental Asia or
                          even, still part of the supercontinent Gondwanaland.
                          At this natural time plants, of what is now Australia, NZ, south America &
                          India, didn't include Eucalypts at all because they hadn't revolved yet (sensu
                          late Mr. Fukuoka<=evolved) at all.
                          The then ancestor species of all Eucalypts still grow today and are still found
                          today in the Wet Tropical Rainforests of far north Queenland, Australia & PNG –
                          most notably _Stockwellia_quadrifida_ (named after forester Mr. Stockwell).
                          Hence at that time 65,000,000 or more years ago the climate of the whole of our
                          Earth was very different, the continents (land masses) were not as they are
                          today, at all, and the plants and animals were not at all as they are today
                          (except for a very few botanically famous persisting species today like
                          Stockwellia, Wollemia, Araucaria, Agathis, Eucalyptopsis, few Protea-ancestors,
                          few Casuarina-ancestors, etc.)
                          As Australia (& India & NZ islands) broke into island–continents off from
                          Gondwanaland they very slowly moved northwards at varying rates of a few
                          centimetres per year. Multiply for example 5 cm by 65,000,000 years and you have
                          3250 km! As they moved towards the equator from the region of the south pole and
                          the Earth's climate changed through many revolutions, all over 65,000,000 years,
                          India came to smash into Asia pushing up the tallest mountain range in our
                          Earth, the Himalayas, creating the new headwaters of the sacred Ganges and many
                          more rivers. Australia moved slowly towards south-east Asia through the
                          Indian-Pacific ocean, into middle latitudes where the world over and in whatever
                          Earth climate they are known as relatively less rain-bearing latitudes from the
                          Earth-atmospheric circulation nature; Hence Australia is now known as "the
                          driest inhabited continent on Earth", about three-quarters by area-measurement
                          has an arid climate, naturally, since millions of years ago, which did lead to
                          the revolution (sensu late Mr. Fukuoka<=evolution) of Eucalypts and all the
                          non-rainforest floras around Australia, making up perhaps 20,000 species &
                          varieties of plants, which hadn't revolved=evolved as species yet at that time.
                          Hence also, as some human *cultures* and not others, have destroyed vegetation
                          en masse around our Earth over the last 13,000 years –eg.
                          Mediterranean-surrounding-cultures, some African-cultures–, these middle
                          latitudes in the northern and southern hemisphere's are the most vulnerable and
                          least quickly recovering from this vegetation destruction, so desert persists
                          longer, taking the longest to recover in these regions. Where in other regions
                          the moisture available from elsewhere like off oceans recovers the vegetation
                          more quickly.

                          You don't have to believe any of this science-based palaeo-history, but whatever
                          you believe about it, do not please believe interpretations of this science that
                          hack into incoherence (& in places racialist against Aborigines) by Peter
                          Andrews. The real sources the science, behind his science confusion, are there
                          in the original science writing for all to freely read.

                          etcetera
                          etcetera

                          /End of Gondwanaland history basics rushed-lesson.

                          Linda,
                          evidently you're way out of your depth on this subject, as evidently is Peter
                          Andrews, meanwhile as i'm, simply out of my depth, but can at least, roughly
                          relay the correct interpretation of many other scientists work, enough to
                          correct grossly unbalanced misinformation; to put this group back onto its topic
                          of healing our Earth rather than destroying it in the name of discriminating
                          falsely against Eucalypts. Eucalypts are natures lovely, in heart & practise,
                          trees & shrubs here in Oz in their more than 600 varieties.
                          Please read (available from the Libraries) the "Flora of Victoria [Australia]"
                          volume 1: Introductory volume with a Mr. Fukuoka slant on its science – and take
                          none of this rubbish advice part of his writing from Peter Andrews.
                          Please stop confusing people with fourth-hand poorly & emotively interpreted
                          nonsense.


                          Best wishes to all,

                          Jason Stewart


                          ________________________________
                          From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Saturday, December 4, 2010 3:31:16
                          Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] Eucalypts


                          Linda,

                          Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they
                          are 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia
                          becomes more and more arid...

                          Is Eucalypts spreading by its own or people are planting it? Does goverment do
                          anything about spreading Eucalypts and acacias? Just eager how things work in
                          your part of world.

                          Regards,
                          Nandan

                          --- On Fri, 12/3/10, Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...> wrote:

                          From: Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@...>
                          Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] Eucalypts
                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Friday, December 3, 2010, 10:10 AM



                          Hi Anant,

                          I am interested in why you chose eucalypts? Are they native to your area?

                          I ask because eucalypts are known for ‘raping’ a landscape – they destroy the
                          soil, suck up ALL the water and prohibit anything else from growing in their
                          root zone and wherever the leaves land – I know this from personal experience
                          because I have tried to garden close to them and it doesn’t matter how much
                          compost or mulch you put on an area the eucalypts turn it to sand in no time at
                          all... and it sucks all the water from below as you are watering from above –
                          impossible!

                          Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are 80%
                          (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia becomes more
                          and more arid...

                          Just interested, I know they have their benefits too, particularly for building!

                          For live fencing you will want a really thick thorny hedge like barberry or
                          hawthorn (or preferably a native equivalent) around the perimeter to keep out
                          the cattle – but you will need to fence for a few years as they grow. Once you
                          have fenced of course your options for cover crops increase exponentially. I
                          wouldn’t worry about weeds – most of them are GOOD and bring up nutrients from
                          the subsoil which then adds the nutrients to the topsoil as they die and
                          decompose... it’s all in the mind!

                          Do you have plenty of water year round – if so then you should be able to get
                          perennial crops growing under them – the ones next door here have climbers like
                          honeysuckle around them and blackberries seem to do well too – they are at the
                          bottom of a slope so get all the nutrient and water from an acre or so above
                          them though... Blackberries will also deter the wild animals and you will get
                          food as well – all good! But they will grow faster than the eucalypts and may
                          smother them – not so good! If you plant them a fair distance away from the
                          trees then they might work. They won’t add to the soil though!

                          Good luck, Linda

                          From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com]
                          On Behalf Of Anant Joglekar

                          Sent: Friday, 3 December 2010 12:45 PM

                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com

                          Cc: Nandan Palaparambil

                          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                          Hi friends !

                          Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135


                          Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since 1995.My

                          lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a minor

                          irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop within

                          Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage

                          Eucalyptus.

                          I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which will

                          control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of soil and


                          stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest some

                          live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.

                          I request advice, suggestions from the group please.

                          Thanks and regards.

                          Anant Joglekar

                          919423089706

                          Sent with Best Compliments -

                          Call me at-

                          +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724

                          Post me at-

                          Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose

                          Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001

                          Meet me at-

                          yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro

                          BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC

                          ________________________________

                          From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...
                          <mailto:p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com> >

                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>

                          Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM

                          Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                          Hi Vishu,

                          I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks like


                          the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown in

                          the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will look

                          like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this will go


                          by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a period of


                          25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil for so

                          many years.

                          Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -

                          http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur, if you


                          need any help I can provide that.

                          Regards,

                          Nandan

                          --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...
                          <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> > wrote:

                          From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> >

                          Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                          To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>

                          Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM

                          Dear All,

                          Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use

                          it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live

                          mulch.

                          I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in

                          coffee plantation.

                          --

                          Vishu

                          http://titli.bikingvikings.com

                          The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Linda Shewan
                          Hi Nandan, Acacias regenerate from fire, (when planting seed you pour boiling water over the seeds to create the same stimulation for germination), while most
                          Message 12 of 19 , Dec 4 1:43 AM
                            Hi Nandan,



                            Acacias regenerate from fire, (when planting seed you pour boiling water over the seeds to create the same stimulation for germination), while most other plants are simply killed by fire. So the fires that ravage the Australian landscape every summer are probably the biggest cause. Also the traditional aboriginal farming techniques of burning tracts of bushland and then allowing them to regrow actually stimulates the germination of these species above all others – this is not racist, just reality – although not all the land was burnt in this way, over the 40000 years of aboriginal management it would obviously have had some impact.



                            Eucalypts spread both by fire regeneration (the fire creates a seed bed where they are then able to colonise areas that were previously covered by grasses etc) and by major plantings both in plantations and as native regeneration projects. I have baby eucalypts come up every year in my back yard from seeds falling into either disturbed soil or tubs of potting mix. They don’t seem to germinate so easily in areas already occupied by grass or other vegetation that isn’t burnt off or bare for any other reason.



                            Here is an interesting report on eucalypts in California http://library.csustan.edu/bsantos/section3.htm - covers both for and against and gives good forestry practices if you choose to use them.

                            And another that really just condemns them... http://www.audubonmagazine.org/incite/incite0201.html



                            There are definitely pros and cons – and I absolutely love the eucalypts here, but I don’t feel the need to grow masses more of them as they are already very well represented. However in any native planting project, I definitely include them – I just try and add a lot of other flora for diversity as well.



                            Kind Regards, Linda







                            From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nandan Palaparambil
                            Sent: Saturday, 4 December 2010 3:31 AM
                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] Eucalypts





                            Linda,

                            Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they
                            are 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia
                            becomes more and more arid...

                            Is Eucalypts spreading by its own or people are planting it? Does goverment do anything about spreading Eucalypts and acacias? Just eager how things work in your part of world.

                            Regards,
                            Nandan

                            --- On Fri, 12/3/10, Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@... <mailto:linda_shewan%40yahoo.com.au> > wrote:

                            From: Linda Shewan <linda_shewan@... <mailto:linda_shewan%40yahoo.com.au> >
                            Subject: RE: [fukuoka_farming] Eucalypts
                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
                            Date: Friday, December 3, 2010, 10:10 AM



                            Hi Anant,

                            I am interested in why you chose eucalypts? Are they native to your area?

                            I ask because eucalypts are known for ‘raping’ a landscape – they destroy the soil, suck up ALL the water and prohibit anything else from growing in their root zone and wherever the leaves land – I know this from personal experience because I have tried to garden close to them and it doesn’t matter how much compost or mulch you put on an area the eucalypts turn it to sand in no time at all... and it sucks all the water from below as you are watering from above – impossible!

                            Eucalypts and acacias used to be 20% of Australian flora and now they are 80% (according to Peter Andrews, not sure of his source) - Australia becomes more and more arid...

                            Just interested, I know they have their benefits too, particularly for building!

                            For live fencing you will want a really thick thorny hedge like barberry or hawthorn (or preferably a native equivalent) around the perimeter to keep out the cattle – but you will need to fence for a few years as they grow. Once you have fenced of course your options for cover crops increase exponentially. I wouldn’t worry about weeds – most of them are GOOD and bring up nutrients from the subsoil which then adds the nutrients to the topsoil as they die and decompose... it’s all in the mind!

                            Do you have plenty of water year round – if so then you should be able to get perennial crops growing under them – the ones next door here have climbers like honeysuckle around them and blackberries seem to do well too – they are at the bottom of a slope so get all the nutrient and water from an acre or so above them though... Blackberries will also deter the wild animals and you will get food as well – all good! But they will grow faster than the eucalypts and may smother them – not so good! If you plant them a fair distance away from the trees then they might work. They won’t add to the soil though!

                            Good luck, Linda

                            From: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Anant Joglekar

                            Sent: Friday, 3 December 2010 12:45 PM

                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>

                            Cc: Nandan Palaparambil

                            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                            Hi friends !

                            Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135

                            Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since 1995.My

                            lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a minor

                            irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop within

                            Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage

                            Eucalyptus.

                            I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which will

                            control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of soil and

                            stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest some

                            live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.

                            I request advice, suggestions from the group please.

                            Thanks and regards.

                            Anant Joglekar

                            919423089706

                            Sent with Best Compliments -

                            Call me at-

                            +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724

                            Post me at-

                            Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose

                            Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001

                            Meet me at-

                            yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro

                            BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC

                            ________________________________

                            From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@... <mailto:p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com> <mailto:p_k_nandanan%40yahoo.com> >

                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>

                            Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM

                            Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                            Hi Vishu,

                            I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks like

                            the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown in

                            the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will look

                            like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this will go

                            by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a period of

                            25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil for so

                            many years.

                            Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -

                            http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur, if you

                            need any help I can provide that.

                            Regards,

                            Nandan

                            --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> > wrote:

                            From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@... <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> <mailto:magicblack%40gmail.com> >

                            Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                            To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>

                            Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM

                            Dear All,

                            Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use

                            it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live

                            mulch.

                            I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in

                            coffee plantation.

                            --

                            Vishu

                            http://titli.bikingvikings.com

                            The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens

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                          • greenie6666
                            Dear Friends: I have been wanting to write for some time, especially to our good friends in India, to just give a bit of warning to them, about our Australian
                            Message 13 of 19 , Dec 4 3:14 PM
                              Dear Friends:
                              I have been wanting to write for some time, especially to our good friends in India, to just give a bit of warning to them, about our Australian Eucalyptus & Casuarinas. I'm an Australian & I spent one year in 2003/4 living in India & recently had another short visit in June this year & plan another trip at the end of February, I have gained a strong love of India & it's people & am very impressed with some of the guys ideas & thoughts on life & the earths problems we discuss here.
                              Then there was Anant's article on planting Eucalypt & Linda's & Jason's follow ups. I have known for a long time of other countries plantings of Eucalypt & read of some of the problems associated with these plantings. Being Australian I have grown up with a strong love of Eucalypts, but since moving to a larger farm 18 hectares [46 acres] 27 years ago I have become worried about some of their abilities, they are an incredible plant & for reforestation on difficult grown, they probably would be one of the best because of their ability to extract nutrients from the hardest of soils & in some places they certainly have a place, because certainly a Eucalypt is better than no tree at all. When I first started here with ideas of natural farming, I left my Eucalypts & inter planted then with other trees, fruit & nuts etc, but when the first drought hit this area, which is almost sub tropical, I noticed how they coped with it, first they extracted all available moisture from the soil to the detriment of other plants, then they had a massive leaf drop, which covered the ground with a mulch of their leaves, which I guess is a good thing for the earth, but their leaves retard the growth of other species & even prevent most grasses from growing. The smooth bark varieties also shed their bark & we think plants can't plan or think, but it looked like they were to me planning the next fire, which most Eucalypts & Casuarinas have evolved to withstand. If they don't get a regular fire, other species may take over, it is their ability to survive fire that has made them the dominant species.
                              Unlike most Australians I had the idea that the best way to prevent our almost annual bushfires, was to improve the soil fertility & grow species that are less flammable. So I had started planting rainforest species here, which I felt grew more here in the past, than at the present day, but had been killed out, because mainly from the frequency of burn off's that are mostly been used as a fire prevention, which in my idea was creating the conditions for the next fire, as mainly only plants that can survive a burn end up becoming the main vegetation in such an area. I had kept fires out of my property for about 20 years, but one year there was a fire in the area & the bushfire brigade, which I was a member of, wanted to do a back burn to prevent spread of this fire, we started the burn at 1am in the morning & even with this really cool burn most of my rainforest species were scorched & died.
                              Here in Australia after just over 200 years of occupation of Europeans, some of us are beginning to see the damage we have done in this time & are now saying that we should look at how the original Aborigines managed the land, the Aborigines didn't have any form of agriculture, but it is said they used to manage the land by cool burns early in the dry season. As Jason mentions it is said that Australia has become so arid because of the continents move over time into a part of the earth which is drier, but as Fukuoka says he believes that deserts are caused from the ground up & I think he's right, maybe we have moved into a drier zone, but if over something like 60,000 to 40,000 years the people inhabiting this land have been practicing burn offs, I'm pretty sure this has had an effect on the land, vegetation, fertility of the soils. To me it's logic if you burn up the efforts of nature each year instead of letting it decompose back into the earth, which is natures way, it will become denuded. I think with us being human we can't help but interfere with natures natural process, we are supposed to be intelligent beings, but I guess that depends on what idea we consider as being intelligent & if we decided that something is intelligent for what the person sees as his desire in the present, but is not in the good of natural processes, maybe it can't be called intelligent.
                              When I visited Sensei at his home in Japan in 1984 he did one of his famous paintings for me & my Japanese wife interpreted his explanation of it, he said as we create a problem with our technologies, we think the smart thing is to solve it with another technology & he said with each technology we bury ourselves deeper & deeper.
                              The warning I want to give to people in India is, I had seen plantings of Eucalypts & Casuarinas & noticed in some areas what appeared to be areas of these plants that appear to be spreading by natural seeding & it just worries me that if these plants are allowed to spread into your environments, in the future in your dry season you may begin to experience wild fires [bush fires] similar to what we experience here in Australia & which just a few year ago killed more than 200 people. Maybe because of how people use resources, it may not come to that state, but it's something you should be aware of. I think in lots of cases these trees are used for firewood or in other ways that maybe they don't reach maturity, so the problem may not be the same as here.

                              Also I would like to make some comment on leguminous plants used in tropical areas such as in India. Fukuoka used White Clover which I don't think grows well in tropical areas & I haven't seen a similar plant that could be used in India, as most of the legumes I have seen & know in tropical places seem to be large bean like plants similar to "Pueraria Javanica" mentioned by Vishu, which might be ok with his coffee plants, but still I think would have to be watched in the early stages as they are so vigorous & rampant that they could over come them before they got large enough. In June I visited a natural farm in Auroville, in the area that they grew rice & millet, they were growing a large bean type legume & also some weeds that were said to be beneficial & I wasn't there to see the rice or millet planted, but such plants would not be able to be just cut & have the rice or millet sown into them, as before the grain would have a chance to get away they would be smothered. It seems that each plant would have to be removed by pulling out to give the grain crop a chance to get away, granted these plants would supply large amounts of humus & nitrogen, but their management would seem to be a big problem in natural farming. Are there other plants that are used that could be controlled easier in a similar way to Fukuoka's clover. Mr. Raju Titus's plant Subabul [Leucaena Luecocephla] is a shrub like plant that would I guess, have to be cut & used as mulch...regards...Norm...from Oz [Australia].
                            • Jason Stewart
                              Dear all, and Norm, In the sense of late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu sensei s natural people , Norm you are depressingly–falsely tarring original natural
                              Message 14 of 19 , Dec 4 8:06 PM
                                Dear all, and Norm,

                                In the sense of late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's "natural people", Norm you
                                are depressingly–falsely 'tarring' original "natural people" with the tar-brush
                                of obviously–the–extreme–of–world–history examples of, my ancestors, greedy,
                                land–grabbing–stealing, destructive (to nature and self=all nature), invading,
                                grossly unsustainable, child–enslaving & African–enslaving–trading, historical
                                Western European & Middle Eastern peoples (as i wrote as the extreme example
                                peoples – often distinct as people speaking languages of the Indo-European
                                language family and the inventors of the only *extremely–expansionary* forms of
                                unsustainable agriculture)

                                One key scholarly reference example:
                                Harris, D. (2002). The expansion capacity of early agricultural systems: a
                                comparative perspective on the spread of agriculture.In P. Bellwood and C.
                                Renfrew eds,Examining the Farming/Language Dispersal Hypothesis, pp. 31–40.
                                Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological
                                Research.

                                -----------------------

                                In the sense of late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's "natural faming" "natural
                                people", Norm you are passing on lies by your writing "the Aborigines didn't
                                have any form of agriculture".


                                Scholarly References (i have and have read all these papers, and can supply them
                                if really needed):
                                *
                                Convincing Ground: Learning to Fall in love with your country

                                ________________________________

                                Bruce PASCOE
                                Availability: Print
                                Electronic Book Format: www.ebooks.com
                                April 2007, pb, 234x153mm, 304pp, b/w illus
                                RRP $39.95 incl. GST
                                ISBN 9780855755492
                                | Contents | Sample Chapter | Index | Reviews |





























                                -> http://www.aiatsis.gov.au/asp/aspbooks/convground.html


                                * Gammage, Bill 2003. Australia Under Aboriginal Management, 15th Barry Andrews
                                Memorial Lecture,
                                2002, Canberra: University College, University of NSW, Australian Defence Force
                                Academy.

                                * Denham, T.P. 2008. Traditional forms of plant exploitation in Australia and
                                New Guinea: the search for common ground. Vegetation History and
                                Archaeobotany 17: 245-8.
                                -> http://www.adelaide.edu.au/efn/publications/Denham_TraditionalForms.pdf
                                -> http://www.adelaide.edu.au/efn/projects/wgp/TDenham_Project.html

                                * Gammage, Bill (2005), " '...far more happier than we Europeans': Aborigines
                                and farmers" (PDF), London Papers in Australian Studies (formerly Working Papers
                                in Australian Studies) (London: Menzies Centre for Australian Studies. King's
                                College. Each year the Centre publishes London Papers in Australian Studies .
                                These are representative of some of the most recent and exciting intellectual
                                work in Australian Studies.) (12): 1–27, ISSN 1746-1774, retrieved 2010-11-23
                                -> http://www.kcl.ac.uk/content/1/c6/01/27/52/LPAS12BillGammage1.pdf
                                -> http://www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/humanities/depts/menzies/research/pubs/lp

                                * Gammage, Bill 1986. Narrandera Shire Narrandera: Bill Gammage for the
                                Narrandera Shire Council.

                                * Denham, T., Donohue, M., & Booth, S. Horticultural experimentation in northern
                                Australia reconsidered. Antiquity No. 83
                                -> http://www.adelaide.edu.au/efn/publications/Denham_etal_2009_Antiquity.pdf

                                * Gerritsen, R (2008). Australia and the origins of agricultureArchaeopress -
                                British Archaeological Reports Ltd

                                * Denham, T.P. and S. Mooney (2008). Human-environment interactions in Australia
                                and New Guinea during the Holocene. The Holocene 18(3): 373-9.

                                * Gott, Beth (1983) Murnong–Microseris scapigera: a study of a staple food of
                                Victorian Aborigines - Australian Aboriginal Studies

                                * Gott, Beth (1992) Koorie Plants, Koorie People: Traditional Aboriginal Food,
                                Fibre and Healing Plants of Victoria - Koorie Heritage Trust, Victoria,
                                Australia.

                                * Gott, Beth (2005) Aboriginal fire management in south‐eastern Australia: aims
                                and frequency - Journal of Biogeography, Wiley

                                * Gammage, Bill (2008) Plain facts: Tasmania under aboriginal management -
                                Landscape Research - Routledge
                                -> http://westinstenv.org/wp-content/Gammagetasaborigsfires.pdf

                                * Gerritsen, R (2010). 'Evidence for indigenous Australian
                                agriculture',Australasian Science, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 35-37.
                                -> http://www.australasianscience.com.au/article/issue-july-august-2010/evidence-indigenous-australian-agriculture.html


                                * Denham, T.P. 2007. Early agriculture: recent conceptual and methodological
                                developments. In T.P. Denham and P. White, eds, The emergence of agriculture: a
                                global view, pp. 1-25. London: Routledge.

                                * Denham, T.P. and J.P. White (eds.) (2007). The emergence of agriculture: a
                                global view One World Archaeology Reader, London: Routledge.

                                *Denham, T.P. J. Atchison, J. Austin, S. Bestel, D. Bowdery, A. Crowther, N.
                                Dolby, A. Fairbairn, J. Field, A. Kennedy, C. Lentfer, C. Matheson, S. Nugent,
                                J. Parr, M. Prebble, G. Robertson, J. Specht, R. Torrence, H. Barton, R.
                                Fullagar, S. Haberle, M. Horrocks, T. Lewis and P. Matthews (2009).
                                Archaeobotany in Australia and New Guinea: practice, potential and
                                prospects. Australian Archaeology (accepted December 2008).
                                -> http://www.adelaide.edu.au/efn/publications/denham_etal_2009.pdf

                                * Denham, T.P., R. Fullagar and L. Head In press. Plant exploitation on Sahul:
                                from colonisation to the emergence of regional specialisation during the
                                Holocene. Quaternary International (accepted March 2008).

                                * Gott, Beth (2008) Indigenous use of plants in south-eastern
                                Australia - Telopea - rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au


                                Many more contemporary papers by Gott, Beth; Bill Gammage; Chase; Hynes & Chase;
                                etc..
                                Much more literature by early European Australians.


                                BTW:
                                * Beth Gott is an elder ethno-botanist from Monash University, Melbourne; was my
                                University lecturer there in 1990; and i continue to correspond with at times.
                                * Tim Denham is a scholar from Monash University, Melbourne
                                * Rupert Gerritsen is a self-funded scholar from here in Canberra attached to
                                the National Library of Australia, A Petherick reader; who i've met &
                                corresponded with a few times about all of this subject material


                                -----------------------

                                Do not get out your apparently triumphalist–Euro-centric–knives (please),
                                whether you know you are doing so or not,
                                to stab–in–the–back people in this sub–continent, who get called Aborigines.
                                It amazes me how you who obviously–evidently are way out of your depth of
                                detailed knowledge of this subject shoot your mouth of with unreferenced and
                                often unbalanced opinions, while the most scholarly people i personally know of
                                this subject, actively choose to say very circumspect statements about these
                                ancient, or 200 years ago history, or today continuing but severely dispossed,
                                subjects.
                                Not really reading, listening, to what i've written about this subject here for
                                up to 8 years and longer elsewhere, and to the extensively documented history of
                                this subject; I'm really tired of that, of you–kind–of–Ozzies, Norm & Peter, and
                                previously Adam & so on, not really reading, listening and so on to so many
                                saying this for so many years, on this subject—thousands of years of sustainable
                                nature farming in this continent, in the sense of the definition of late Mr.
                                Fukuoka Masanobu sensei.

                                It's great you've been to travelling in India. I want to hear a lot more stories
                                about that please.
                                But it is not necessary for this subject, learning this subject, to travel to
                                India.
                                The longest continuing nature farming traditions (in the sense of late Mr.
                                Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's definition by his principles) in our Earth, and still
                                continuing in some places in NSW, Australia, not so far from you Norm, like for
                                example with the Scuthorpe's family in N.W. NSW.
                                It's right before your eyes in the native Oz flora (& fauna) only waiting for
                                you to see and hear and smell and touch and 'aware' it AND EAT it!

                                Book Reference:

                                "Bush foods of New South Wales"

                                by Kathy Stewart & Bob Percival
                                (Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney 1997).

                                -29 pages - many great photos - many great drawings-

                                -> http://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/85542/Bushfoodsbook.pdf


                                Freeeeee!!! - I've paid money to buy many copies of it for friends over the
                                years.


                                An analogy reference:
                                "ON A GREEN MOUNTAIN - With Masanobu Fukuoka Sensei of Natural Farming
                                -Copyright (c) 1995 Jim Bones"
                                -> http://web.archive.org/web/20060413224615/www.seedballs.com/gmmfpa.html


                                ________________________________


                                In order now is, from
                                Historian, Teacher, Award winning writer of numerous book, short stories, poems
                                et. al., Editor, etc,
                                a truthful writing quote, for which plenty of scholarly and historical
                                documentation occurs in the public record and often by famous historical figures
                                like Mitchell, Sturt, etc.:
                                -> http://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=5858
                                "
                                Australians in denial ...
                                By Bruce Pascoe - posted Monday, 21 May 2007

                                Australia is a baby. An innocent baby, gurgling with good humour and wonder.
                                We've pulled the paper bag over our head and believe no-one can see us.

                                There we are, in the middle of the floor with a bag over our head. We refuse to
                                look back at our past and hope that with no effort on our part the future will
                                look after itself.

                                We live in a country with an incredible history but pretend it began in 1788.
                                The ancient past was not written so therefore it doesn't exist. The Aborigines
                                are primitive hunter gatherers who are migrants to the country just like us, so
                                really they had no more right to the land than we did. And we're better at it.


                                Oh, baby, pull off the bag, examine your land.

                                It is on the public record that Aboriginal people were not feckless and innocent
                                nomads but constructed complex housing; harvested grain, yams, eels, fish and
                                other produce with sophisticated feats of engineering; and created the first and
                                most enduring art, music and language in the world.

                                The social organisation looks amazingly like the first democracy, the first
                                modern state where art and dance were devoted more time than the procurement of
                                food.

                                We live in an incredible place but refuse to believe its history.

                                The eel aquaculture of the Western District of Victoria covers thousands of
                                hectares and involves hundreds of kilometres of stone walls, weirs and tunnels
                                burrowed through solid rock. The houses for these fishermen were set out in
                                large villages and some of them could accommodate 20 or more people. They are
                                like small town halls.

                                Grain was harvested in Queensland and from other grasslands: the fields of over
                                1,000 acres were carefully managed to maintain productivity. Settlers found this
                                grain stored in stone silos and intricately sewn, vermin proof skin bags. Often
                                the stored grain weighed over one tonne.

                                This is all on the public record in the first hand reports of Europeans. So why
                                do we maintain the myth of a crude civilisation meandering hopelessly across the
                                continent? Because we have to? Because to admit anything else defies our
                                perception of ownership and legitimacy, our own perception of how we took the
                                land?

                                We need to understand that there was a war in this country and the Indigenes
                                lost it but not before conducting battles which forced the Europeans back on
                                many fronts in the campaign. Aboriginal people did not just go away, disappear,
                                die out from exotic diseases - they were defeated in war. That war is on the
                                public record. The word “war” was used by our first governors and magistrates:
                                it is there for any Australian to read.

                                Of course it was unlike any other war we are familiar with because Aboriginal
                                people had lived within nation boundaries which remained the same over
                                thousands, probably tens of thousands, of years - their languages tell us this
                                because of the reference to ancient climatic and geological events. This country
                                is unique but we can't bring ourselves to admit it because we have to believe
                                the Indigenes walked away from it, left the field in awe of the marvellous
                                European.

                                I implore young Australians to undertake a scrutiny of the available material
                                and begin a negotiation with Aboriginal Australia, not about money but about our
                                shared history, our shared future and in celebration of this land we love, the
                                land we toast with cups of tea and Indigenous wine and beer

                                We love our country but have pulled the bag over our head pretending the world
                                can't see how we arrived

                                Young Australians please read your history, don't believe your elders' version
                                of events, most have got their head in a bag. You are young, intelligent,
                                hopeful, you have the rest of your lives ahead of you. Enjoy it, learn that you
                                live in a fabulous place where a civilisation developed which may yet teach us
                                crucial lessons about sustainability and civilised behaviour.

                                To understand our history is not an act of grand generosity but a bloody-minded
                                necessity. The alternative is to live with a bag over your head ... and baby,
                                it's dark in there.
                                "


                                Enough evidence said???


                                Biggest best wishes,

                                Jason
                                SE Oz.


                                ________________________________
                                From: greenie6666 <normbeee@...>
                                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Sunday, December 5, 2010 10:14:57
                                Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Eucalypts


                                Dear Friends:
                                I have been wanting to write for some time, especially to our good friends in
                                India, to just give a bit of warning to them, about our Australian Eucalyptus &
                                Casuarinas. I'm an Australian & I spent one year in 2003/4 living in India &
                                recently had another short visit in June this year & plan another trip at the
                                end of February, I have gained a strong love of India & it's people & am very
                                impressed with some of the guys ideas & thoughts on life & the earths problems
                                we discuss here.
                                Then there was Anant's article on planting Eucalypt & Linda's & Jason's follow
                                ups. I have known for a long time of other countries plantings of Eucalypt &
                                read of some of the problems associated with these plantings. Being Australian I
                                have grown up with a strong love of Eucalypts, but since moving to a larger farm
                                18 hectares [46 acres] 27 years ago I have become worried about some of their
                                abilities, they are an incredible plant & for reforestation on difficult grown,
                                they probably would be one of the best because of their ability to extract
                                nutrients from the hardest of soils & in some places they certainly have a
                                place, because certainly a Eucalypt is better than no tree at all. When I first
                                started here with ideas of natural farming, I left my Eucalypts & inter planted
                                then with other trees, fruit & nuts etc, but when the first drought hit this
                                area, which is almost sub tropical, I noticed how they coped with it, first they
                                extracted all available moisture from the soil to the detriment of other plants,
                                then they had a massive leaf drop, which covered the ground with a mulch of
                                their leaves, which I guess is a good thing for the earth, but their leaves
                                retard the growth of other species & even prevent most grasses from growing. The
                                smooth bark varieties also shed their bark & we think plants can't plan or
                                think, but it looked like they were to me planning the next fire, which most
                                Eucalypts & Casuarinas have evolved to withstand. If they don't get a regular
                                fire, other species may take over, it is their ability to survive fire that has
                                made them the dominant species.
                                Unlike most Australians I had the idea that the best way to prevent our almost
                                annual bushfires, was to improve the soil fertility & grow species that are less
                                flammable. So I had started planting rainforest species here, which I felt grew
                                more here in the past, than at the present day, but had been killed out, because
                                mainly from the frequency of burn off's that are mostly been used as a fire
                                prevention, which in my idea was creating the conditions for the next fire, as
                                mainly only plants that can survive a burn end up becoming the main vegetation
                                in such an area. I had kept fires out of my property for about 20 years, but one
                                year there was a fire in the area & the bushfire brigade, which I was a member
                                of, wanted to do a back burn to prevent spread of this fire, we started the burn
                                at 1am in the morning & even with this really cool burn most of my rainforest
                                species were scorched & died.
                                Here in Australia after just over 200 years of occupation of Europeans, some of
                                us are beginning to see the damage we have done in this time & are now saying
                                that we should look at how the original Aborigines managed the land, the
                                Aborigines didn't have any form of agriculture, but it is said they used to
                                manage the land by cool burns early in the dry season. As Jason mentions it is
                                said that Australia has become so arid because of the continents move over time
                                into a part of the earth which is drier, but as Fukuoka says he believes that
                                deserts are caused from the ground up & I think he's right, maybe we have moved
                                into a drier zone, but if over something like 60,000 to 40,000 years the people
                                inhabiting this land have been practicing burn offs, I'm pretty sure this has
                                had an effect on the land, vegetation, fertility of the soils. To me it's logic
                                if you burn up the efforts of nature each year instead of letting it decompose
                                back into the earth, which is natures way, it will become denuded. I think with
                                us being human we can't help but interfere with natures natural process, we are
                                supposed to be intelligent beings, but I guess that depends on what idea we
                                consider as being intelligent & if we decided that something is intelligent for
                                what the person sees as his desire in the present, but is not in the good of
                                natural processes, maybe it can't be called intelligent.
                                When I visited Sensei at his home in Japan in 1984 he did one of his famous
                                paintings for me & my Japanese wife interpreted his explanation of it, he said
                                as we create a problem with our technologies, we think the smart thing is to
                                solve it with another technology & he said with each technology we bury
                                ourselves deeper & deeper.
                                The warning I want to give to people in India is, I had seen plantings of
                                Eucalypts & Casuarinas & noticed in some areas what appeared to be areas of
                                these plants that appear to be spreading by natural seeding & it just worries me
                                that if these plants are allowed to spread into your environments, in the future
                                in your dry season you may begin to experience wild fires [bush fires] similar
                                to what we experience here in Australia & which just a few year ago killed more
                                than 200 people. Maybe because of how people use resources, it may not come to
                                that state, but it's something you should be aware of. I think in lots of cases
                                these trees are used for firewood or in other ways that maybe they don't reach
                                maturity, so the problem may not be the same as here.

                                Also I would like to make some comment on leguminous plants used in tropical
                                areas such as in India. Fukuoka used White Clover which I don't think grows well
                                in tropical areas & I haven't seen a similar plant that could be used in India,
                                as most of the legumes I have seen & know in tropical places seem to be large
                                bean like plants similar to "Pueraria Javanica" mentioned by Vishu, which might
                                be ok with his coffee plants, but still I think would have to be watched in the
                                early stages as they are so vigorous & rampant that they could over come them
                                before they got large enough. In June I visited a natural farm in Auroville, in
                                the area that they grew rice & millet, they were growing a large bean type
                                legume & also some weeds that were said to be beneficial & I wasn't there to see
                                the rice or millet planted, but such plants would not be able to be just cut &
                                have the rice or millet sown into them, as before the grain would have a chance
                                to get away they would be smothered. It seems that each plant would have to be
                                removed by pulling out to give the grain crop a chance to get away, granted
                                these plants would supply large amounts of humus & nitrogen, but their
                                management would seem to be a big problem in natural farming. Are there other
                                plants that are used that could be controlled easier in a similar way to
                                Fukuoka's clover. Mr. Raju Titus's plant Subabul [Leucaena Luecocephla] is a
                                shrub like plant that would I guess, have to be cut & used as
                                mulch...regards...Norm...from Oz [Australia].






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Jason Stewart
                                Late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu sensei only talks–writes about re–Greening (in the sense of verdure) the world s man-made deserts – he spells this out in
                                Message 15 of 19 , Dec 4 8:45 PM
                                  Late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu sensei only talks–writes about re–Greening (in the
                                  sense of verdure) the world's man-made deserts – he spells this out in numerous
                                  documents – simplistically the areas that humans have desertified, not the
                                  natural deserts originating from nature-Great-Spirit-God-humans.
                                  Late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu sensei does not throw out out pre-existing knowledge,
                                  explicitly he explains that that is necessary to fix the problems created by
                                  previous knowledge. It's better called by prexifing with the Japanese word: Mu
                                  knowledge – meaning no knowledge (against or outside of nature) – meaning all
                                  the credit for knowledge goes to nature and does not go to us as individuals –
                                  no egocentric knowledge. In alignment with the terms like no-action (mu i)
                                  (against nature) and no weeding by cultivation or herbicides (against nature),
                                  etc. .

                                  Are you going to 'grow' a nature farm in the sense of late Mr. Fukuoka Masanobu
                                  sensei in Antarctica?
                                  No! (that's of course absurd).
                                  Antarctica is, known as, the driest continent, on our Earth (essentially not
                                  permanently inhabitated in the self-sustaining sense of the definition of
                                  inhabited – Oz the driest inhabited continent)
                                  Antarctica, frozen deserts, of course are natural! (since tens of millions of
                                  years ago)

                                  Australia, central Australia's, deserts, originate in nature, existing in
                                  plentiful evidence since many millions of years ago, and many millions of years
                                  before humans ever existed.
                                  They are in constant flux (change) as is all nature, all the time. Expansion,
                                  contraction, different plant and animal species coming and going over millions
                                  of years, with many different shapes and sizes—forms—Protean.
                                  Humbly, the first Australians in much-evidence tamed the
                                  massive–continental–scale wild fires (lightning ignitions) by vastly reducing
                                  the scale, intensity and damage of those massive–continental–scale wild fires to
                                  human–scale patch burning the grassy vegetation types, and parts, not all, of
                                  the the shrubby–heathy vegetation types at the time European people, my
                                  ancestors, were invading with their colony (1770–88–).

                                  Reference:
                                  Bowman, David "Bushfires: A Darwinian Perspective"
                                  in Geoffrey Cary, David Lindenmayer, Stephen Dovers (2003) Australia burning:
                                  fire ecology, policy and management issues
                                  CSIRO Publishing. 280 pp.

                                  The Atacama desert, Chile is another natural desert from natural atmosphere &
                                  ocean current circulations and rainshadow behind mountains.
                                  Wikipedia quote:
                                  "
                                  The Atacama Desert is a virtually rainless plateau in South America, covering a
                                  600-mile (1,000 km) strip of land on the Pacific coast of South America, west of
                                  the Andes mountains. The Atacama desert is, according to NASA,National
                                  Geographic and many other publications, the driest desert in the
                                  world,[1][2][3] due to the rain shadow on theleeward side of the Chilean Coast
                                  Range, as well as a coastal inversion layer created by the cold
                                  offshore Humboldt Current.[4] The Atacama occupies 40,600 square miles (105,000
                                  km2)[5] in northern Chile, composed mostly of saltbasins (salares), sand,
                                  and felsic lava flows towards the Andes.
                                  "

                                  ________________________________
                                  From: greenie6666 <normbeee@...>
                                  To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Sunday, December 5, 2010 10:14:57
                                  Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Eucalypts


                                  Dear Friends:
                                  I have been wanting to write for some time, especially to our good friends in
                                  India, to just give a bit of warning to them, about our Australian Eucalyptus &
                                  Casuarinas. I'm an Australian & I spent one year in 2003/4 living in India &
                                  recently had another short visit in June this year & plan another trip at the
                                  end of February, I have gained a strong love of India & it's people & am very
                                  impressed with some of the guys ideas & thoughts on life & the earths problems
                                  we discuss here.
                                  Then there was Anant's article on planting Eucalypt & Linda's & Jason's follow
                                  ups. I have known for a long time of other countries plantings of Eucalypt &
                                  read of some of the problems associated with these plantings. Being Australian I
                                  have grown up with a strong love of Eucalypts, but since moving to a larger farm
                                  18 hectares [46 acres] 27 years ago I have become worried about some of their
                                  abilities, they are an incredible plant & for reforestation on difficult grown,
                                  they probably would be one of the best because of their ability to extract
                                  nutrients from the hardest of soils & in some places they certainly have a
                                  place, because certainly a Eucalypt is better than no tree at all. When I first
                                  started here with ideas of natural farming, I left my Eucalypts & inter planted
                                  then with other trees, fruit & nuts etc, but when the first drought hit this
                                  area, which is almost sub tropical, I noticed how they coped with it, first they
                                  extracted all available moisture from the soil to the detriment of other plants,
                                  then they had a massive leaf drop, which covered the ground with a mulch of
                                  their leaves, which I guess is a good thing for the earth, but their leaves
                                  retard the growth of other species & even prevent most grasses from growing. The
                                  smooth bark varieties also shed their bark & we think plants can't plan or
                                  think, but it looked like they were to me planning the next fire, which most
                                  Eucalypts & Casuarinas have evolved to withstand. If they don't get a regular
                                  fire, other species may take over, it is their ability to survive fire that has
                                  made them the dominant species.
                                  Unlike most Australians I had the idea that the best way to prevent our almost
                                  annual bushfires, was to improve the soil fertility & grow species that are less
                                  flammable. So I had started planting rainforest species here, which I felt grew
                                  more here in the past, than at the present day, but had been killed out, because
                                  mainly from the frequency of burn off's that are mostly been used as a fire
                                  prevention, which in my idea was creating the conditions for the next fire, as
                                  mainly only plants that can survive a burn end up becoming the main vegetation
                                  in such an area. I had kept fires out of my property for about 20 years, but one
                                  year there was a fire in the area & the bushfire brigade, which I was a member
                                  of, wanted to do a back burn to prevent spread of this fire, we started the burn
                                  at 1am in the morning & even with this really cool burn most of my rainforest
                                  species were scorched & died.
                                  Here in Australia after just over 200 years of occupation of Europeans, some of
                                  us are beginning to see the damage we have done in this time & are now saying
                                  that we should look at how the original Aborigines managed the land, the
                                  Aborigines didn't have any form of agriculture, but it is said they used to
                                  manage the land by cool burns early in the dry season. As Jason mentions it is
                                  said that Australia has become so arid because of the continents move over time
                                  into a part of the earth which is drier, but as Fukuoka says he believes that
                                  deserts are caused from the ground up & I think he's right, maybe we have moved
                                  into a drier zone, but if over something like 60,000 to 40,000 years the people
                                  inhabiting this land have been practicing burn offs, I'm pretty sure this has
                                  had an effect on the land, vegetation, fertility of the soils. To me it's logic
                                  if you burn up the efforts of nature each year instead of letting it decompose
                                  back into the earth, which is natures way, it will become denuded. I think with
                                  us being human we can't help but interfere with natures natural process, we are
                                  supposed to be intelligent beings, but I guess that depends on what idea we
                                  consider as being intelligent & if we decided that something is intelligent for
                                  what the person sees as his desire in the present, but is not in the good of
                                  natural processes, maybe it can't be called intelligent.
                                  When I visited Sensei at his home in Japan in 1984 he did one of his famous
                                  paintings for me & my Japanese wife interpreted his explanation of it, he said
                                  as we create a problem with our technologies, we think the smart thing is to
                                  solve it with another technology & he said with each technology we bury
                                  ourselves deeper & deeper.
                                  The warning I want to give to people in India is, I had seen plantings of
                                  Eucalypts & Casuarinas & noticed in some areas what appeared to be areas of
                                  these plants that appear to be spreading by natural seeding & it just worries me
                                  that if these plants are allowed to spread into your environments, in the future
                                  in your dry season you may begin to experience wild fires [bush fires] similar
                                  to what we experience here in Australia & which just a few year ago killed more
                                  than 200 people. Maybe because of how people use resources, it may not come to
                                  that state, but it's something you should be aware of. I think in lots of cases
                                  these trees are used for firewood or in other ways that maybe they don't reach
                                  maturity, so the problem may not be the same as here.

                                  Also I would like to make some comment on leguminous plants used in tropical
                                  areas such as in India. Fukuoka used White Clover which I don't think grows well
                                  in tropical areas & I haven't seen a similar plant that could be used in India,
                                  as most of the legumes I have seen & know in tropical places seem to be large
                                  bean like plants similar to "Pueraria Javanica" mentioned by Vishu, which might
                                  be ok with his coffee plants, but still I think would have to be watched in the
                                  early stages as they are so vigorous & rampant that they could over come them
                                  before they got large enough. In June I visited a natural farm in Auroville, in
                                  the area that they grew rice & millet, they were growing a large bean type
                                  legume & also some weeds that were said to be beneficial & I wasn't there to see
                                  the rice or millet planted, but such plants would not be able to be just cut &
                                  have the rice or millet sown into them, as before the grain would have a chance
                                  to get away they would be smothered. It seems that each plant would have to be
                                  removed by pulling out to give the grain crop a chance to get away, granted
                                  these plants would supply large amounts of humus & nitrogen, but their
                                  management would seem to be a big problem in natural farming. Are there other
                                  plants that are used that could be controlled easier in a similar way to
                                  Fukuoka's clover. Mr. Raju Titus's plant Subabul [Leucaena Luecocephla] is a
                                  shrub like plant that would I guess, have to be cut & used as
                                  mulch...regards...Norm...from Oz [Australia].






                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Anant Joglekar
                                  Hi Thank you very much for your email. My father ( Anant Joglekar ) is out of station till 10 December, 2010 He shall get back to you after coming back. Warm
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Dec 5 2:16 AM
                                    Hi

                                    Thank you very much for your email.

                                    My father ( Anant Joglekar ) is out of station till 10 December, 2010 He shall
                                    get back to you after coming back.

                                    Warm Regards

                                    Shubhada Joglekar




                                    Sent with Best Compliments -
                                    Call me at-
                                    +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724
                                    Post me at-
                                    Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose
                                    Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001

                                    Meet me at-
                                    yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro

                                    BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC





                                    ________________________________
                                    From: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
                                    To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                    Cc: Anant Joglekar <apjoglekar@...>
                                    Sent: Fri, 3 December, 2010 10:58:47 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica


                                    Dear Anant Joglekar,

                                    Writing this from the land of the native Eucalypts (about 600 species native)
                                    Australia, :) , i write:
                                    Please list the names of any plants growing around the area there, any names you

                                    have including Indian local common names, of any possible suitable plants such
                                    as grasses, shrubs, legumes and spiny plants for the live fencing.

                                    I have the name of Cockspur Thorn –botanical name:
                                    "_Maclura_cochinchinensis_ (Lour.) Corner" of India and of Australia and China.
                                    A very spiny woody big spreading shrub &/or vine, with edible ripe orange
                                    fruits. It naturally grows in forests (dry & wet rainforests, & wet Eucalypt
                                    forests) in warm temperate and subtropical south and eastern Australia (NSW &
                                    QLD).

                                    -> http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Cockspur%20Thorn.htmlMore photos

                                    in Australia:

                                    ->
                                    http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Maclura~cochinchinensis->
                                    http://www.rainforestpublishing.com.au/index.php?href=botanical&dir=botanical_pages&subpage=view&ext=php&array_place=13&item_id=533#image_533
                                    3

                                    (
                                    http://www.rainforestpublishing.com.au/botanical_images/Maclura%20cochinchinensis%209.jpg
                                    )

                                    -> http://www.flickr.com/photos/blackdiamondimages/4205370259/in/photostream/
                                    -> http://toowoombaplants2008.blogspot.com/2008/02/cockspur-thorn.html

                                    ----------------------------------------------------------

                                    Any leguminous nitrogen fixing species please list, we all may each have some
                                    pieces of encouraging information about a list of your local species, if you
                                    need to please ask local people and local farmers the local plant species.

                                    Eucalypts (from Australia) can produce unusual environments underneath their
                                    trees, from the leaf oils, and from the root symbiotic relationships, root
                                    chemicals and environments made by the roots. Unusual elsewhere in the world.
                                    Here in Australia there are many endemic species of plants long adapted growing
                                    in these Eucalypt environments, above-ground and in the root zone (adapted
                                    meaning revolved sensu Mr. Fukuoka instead of evolved sensu science, long
                                    meaning over millions of years).

                                    Best wishes to all,
                                    Jase
                                    (Jason Stewart)
                                    south-eastern Australia

                                    ________________________________
                                    From: Anant Joglekar <apjoglekar@...>
                                    To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                    Cc: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
                                    Sent: Friday, December 3, 2010 12:45:18
                                    Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                                    Hi friends !

                                    Last year in August,2009,I have planted Eucalyptus Clones in 90 Acres out of 135


                                    Acres of my family holding which is a certified organic farm land since 1995.My
                                    lands are surrounded by 300 hect. of dense forest , on the left bank of a minor
                                    irrigation project. I take pigeon-pees ( Arhar / Tuvar ) as inter-crop within
                                    Eucalyptus but wild animals and grazing cattle destroy it and also damage
                                    Eucalyptus.

                                    I need help/ advice/ suggestions for some multipurpose cover crop which will
                                    control weeds, keep away wild and grazing animals , add to fertility of soil and


                                    stays with eucalyptus as support or companion crop. Please also suggest some
                                    live fencing strategy to protect boundaries.

                                    I request advice, suggestions from the group please.

                                    Thanks and regards.

                                    Anant Joglekar
                                    919423089706

                                    Sent with Best Compliments -
                                    Call me at-
                                    +919423089706 / +917232245567 / +917232288724
                                    Post me at-
                                    Anant Joglekar, Secretary and C.E.O; Organic Linkage On-line Multipurpose
                                    Organisation, 9,Patrakar Nagar, Yavatmal Maharashtra State, India 445001

                                    Meet me at-
                                    yahoo- apjoglekar / skype- orgagro / trade manager- orgagro

                                    BE ORGANIC - BUY ORGANIC - LIVE ORGANIC

                                    ________________________________
                                    From: Nandan Palaparambil <p_k_nandanan@...>
                                    To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Thu, 2 December, 2010 9:49:13 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica

                                    Hi Vishu,

                                    I just searched for this 'Pueraria Javanica' and from the pictures it looks like


                                    the one used as cover crops in rubber plantations in kerala. This is grown in
                                    the initial stages of the rubber trees, and establishes quickly and will look
                                    like a carpet. When the trees becomes bigger and shade establishes, this will go


                                    by itself. One person recently told me, when the trees are cut after a period of


                                    25 years (typically), they come back again, they just remain in the soil for so
                                    many years.

                                    Also came across the site, sure you also would have seen this -
                                    http://www.covercrops.org This company is based in my home town Trichur, if you


                                    need any help I can provide that.

                                    Regards,
                                    Nandan

                                    --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...> wrote:

                                    From: Vishu Shetty <magicblack@...>
                                    Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Pueraria Javanica
                                    To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 2:50 PM

                                    Dear All,

                                    Need information on buying seeds of *Pueraria Javanica* which I plan to use

                                    it as a cover crop basically primarily to control Weed and also as live

                                    mulch.

                                    I am also seeking inputs on the *Pueraria Javanica* as a cover crop in

                                    coffee plantation.

                                    --

                                    Vishu

                                    http://titli.bikingvikings.com

                                    The future enters into us, in order to transform us, long before it happens

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Nandan Palaparambil
                                    Hi Norm, A couple of people (Rajuji, Kumaraswamy +??) have been reporting that green gram (moong dal) can be used instead of white clover. Also there has been
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Dec 7 2:04 AM
                                      Hi Norm,

                                      A couple of people (Rajuji, Kumaraswamy +??) have been reporting that green gram (moong dal) can be used instead of white clover. Also there has been a suggestion that cow pea also can be used..But I think this research has to be done in more fields and a working system like Fukuoka's style of paddy has to come up.

                                      Please read Fukuoka san's statement on white clover in the following interview..

                                      http://thepines.blogspot.com/2009/07/pines-i-notice-that-youre-drawing.html -

                                      "Hmmm... my climate is totally unlike his, so rather than use white
                                      clover, I'll try this other ground cover." That line of reasoning could
                                      well take you off the track and lead you down a lot of blind alleys!
                                      Clover is necessary to keep the weeds back and replenish the soil.



                                      Regards,
                                      Nandan

                                      --- On Sun, 12/5/10, greenie6666 <normbeee@...> wrote:

                                      From: greenie6666 <normbeee@...>
                                      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Eucalypts
                                      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                                      Date: Sunday, December 5, 2010, 4:44 AM







                                       









                                      Dear Friends:

                                      I have been wanting to write for some time, especially to our good friends in India, to just give a bit of warning to them, about our Australian Eucalyptus & Casuarinas. I'm an Australian & I spent one year in 2003/4 living in India & recently had another short visit in June this year & plan another trip at the end of February, I have gained a strong love of India & it's people & am very impressed with some of the guys ideas & thoughts on life & the earths problems we discuss here.

                                      Then there was Anant's article on planting Eucalypt & Linda's & Jason's follow ups. I have known for a long time of other countries plantings of Eucalypt & read of some of the problems associated with these plantings. Being Australian I have grown up with a strong love of Eucalypts, but since moving to a larger farm 18 hectares [46 acres] 27 years ago I have become worried about some of their abilities, they are an incredible plant & for reforestation on difficult grown, they probably would be one of the best because of their ability to extract nutrients from the hardest of soils & in some places they certainly have a place, because certainly a Eucalypt is better than no tree at all. When I first started here with ideas of natural farming, I left my Eucalypts & inter planted then with other trees, fruit & nuts etc, but when the first drought hit this area, which is almost sub tropical, I noticed how they coped with it, first they extracted all available
                                      moisture from the soil to the detriment of other plants, then they had a massive leaf drop, which covered the ground with a mulch of their leaves, which I guess is a good thing for the earth, but their leaves retard the growth of other species & even prevent most grasses from growing. The smooth bark varieties also shed their bark & we think plants can't plan or think, but it looked like they were to me planning the next fire, which most Eucalypts & Casuarinas have evolved to withstand. If they don't get a regular fire, other species may take over, it is their ability to survive fire that has made them the dominant species.

                                      Unlike most Australians I had the idea that the best way to prevent our almost annual bushfires, was to improve the soil fertility & grow species that are less flammable. So I had started planting rainforest species here, which I felt grew more here in the past, than at the present day, but had been killed out, because mainly from the frequency of burn off's that are mostly been used as a fire prevention, which in my idea was creating the conditions for the next fire, as mainly only plants that can survive a burn end up becoming the main vegetation in such an area. I had kept fires out of my property for about 20 years, but one year there was a fire in the area & the bushfire brigade, which I was a member of, wanted to do a back burn to prevent spread of this fire, we started the burn at 1am in the morning & even with this really cool burn most of my rainforest species were scorched & died.

                                      Here in Australia after just over 200 years of occupation of Europeans, some of us are beginning to see the damage we have done in this time & are now saying that we should look at how the original Aborigines managed the land, the Aborigines didn't have any form of agriculture, but it is said they used to manage the land by cool burns early in the dry season. As Jason mentions it is said that Australia has become so arid because of the continents move over time into a part of the earth which is drier, but as Fukuoka says he believes that deserts are caused from the ground up & I think he's right, maybe we have moved into a drier zone, but if over something like 60,000 to 40,000 years the people inhabiting this land have been practicing burn offs, I'm pretty sure this has had an effect on the land, vegetation, fertility of the soils. To me it's logic if you burn up the efforts of nature each year instead of letting it decompose back into the earth, which
                                      is natures way, it will become denuded. I think with us being human we can't help but interfere with natures natural process, we are supposed to be intelligent beings, but I guess that depends on what idea we consider as being intelligent & if we decided that something is intelligent for what the person sees as his desire in the present, but is not in the good of natural processes, maybe it can't be called intelligent.

                                      When I visited Sensei at his home in Japan in 1984 he did one of his famous paintings for me & my Japanese wife interpreted his explanation of it, he said as we create a problem with our technologies, we think the smart thing is to solve it with another technology & he said with each technology we bury ourselves deeper & deeper.

                                      The warning I want to give to people in India is, I had seen plantings of Eucalypts & Casuarinas & noticed in some areas what appeared to be areas of these plants that appear to be spreading by natural seeding & it just worries me that if these plants are allowed to spread into your environments, in the future in your dry season you may begin to experience wild fires [bush fires] similar to what we experience here in Australia & which just a few year ago killed more than 200 people. Maybe because of how people use resources, it may not come to that state, but it's something you should be aware of. I think in lots of cases these trees are used for firewood or in other ways that maybe they don't reach maturity, so the problem may not be the same as here.



                                      Also I would like to make some comment on leguminous plants used in tropical areas such as in India. Fukuoka used White Clover which I don't think grows well in tropical areas & I haven't seen a similar plant that could be used in India, as most of the legumes I have seen & know in tropical places seem to be large bean like plants similar to "Pueraria Javanica" mentioned by Vishu, which might be ok with his coffee plants, but still I think would have to be watched in the early stages as they are so vigorous & rampant that they could over come them before they got large enough. In June I visited a natural farm in Auroville, in the area that they grew rice & millet, they were growing a large bean type legume & also some weeds that were said to be beneficial & I wasn't there to see the rice or millet planted, but such plants would not be able to be just cut & have the rice or millet sown into them, as before the grain would have a chance to get away they
                                      would be smothered. It seems that each plant would have to be removed by pulling out to give the grain crop a chance to get away, granted these plants would supply large amounts of humus & nitrogen, but their management would seem to be a big problem in natural farming. Are there other plants that are used that could be controlled easier in a similar way to Fukuoka's clover. Mr. Raju Titus's plant Subabul [Leucaena Luecocephla] is a shrub like plant that would I guess, have to be cut & used as mulch...regards...Norm...from Oz [Australia].

























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