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Seed saving and Breeding

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  • Suraj
    I m sure there are folks here who have done seed saving and/or breeding. I have related curiosity - please help satisfy the itch... :) From what I understand,
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 22, 2010
      I'm sure there are folks here who have done seed saving and/or breeding. I
      have related curiosity - please help satisfy the itch... :)

      From what I understand, seed saving is the process of distributing a given
      domesticated 'variety's genetic information to as many diverse geographic
      and climatic conditions. It can be said, we're taking a 'backup'. It is easy
      to see how Seed saving also helps increase the 'bio diversity' of the said
      species because the saved variety comes to meet several new varieties.
      Varieties that are prevalent in the region where the seed is newly being
      'saved' in. The seeds of the prevalent variety are the successful
      descendents and bearers of those successful traits suitable for those local
      conditions. While those local conditions can be 'incorporated' into the seed
      being 'saved', the introduction of a foreign trait can also cause havoc to
      local ecosystems and sometimes permanently modify local ecosystems that for
      all practical purposes, besides the zen in the moment, the farmer is going
      to be hungry while he tries to understand what is going on.

      1. What are the chances that seed saving results in bad outcomes? Such as,
      producing more powerful Weedy rice varieties. I'd tend to think, the chances
      might be even more towards non-desired outcomes, given nature's way of
      selecting results in off-springs that are the most leanest and meanest,
      unlike what humans desire and select for (to be bountiful, tasty, etc.,).

      2. How is the racial purity of a given yield maintained in an environment
      where seeds are being saved? Or is the introduction of genetic diversity
      generally a good thing for breeders?

      Did fukuoka himself attempt to breed, perhaps "all natural",
      rice/orange/etc., varieties? What is fukuoka's take on seed saving? I'm sure
      he'd recommend that we take a stroll across the orchards, pick the most
      'reddish' and sweetest fruits and drop their seeds in our backyards in order
      to eventually create a natural garden ;)

      -Suraj


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