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RE: [fukuoka_farming] Water source

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  • Ramki Bondada
    It all depends on What is land suitable for? what are you planning to cultivate in the land and what would be the irrigation requirements. Diesel engine set
    Message 1 of 15 , Nov 21, 2010
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      It all depends on What is land suitable for? what are you planning to cultivate in the land and what would be the irrigation requirements.

      Diesel engine set will pump water from upto 30 feet which is proven. May assess this if it meets up your requirements.

      Ramki




      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      From: offtown@...
      Date: Sun, 21 Nov 2010 05:45:31 -0800
      Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Water source






      Both are beyond my reach. I may try rope pump but designing a guide box for
      the rope pump is not easy.

      Boovarahan S

      On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 5:02 AM, yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > There are solar and wind powered pumps available. The other alternative
      > would be human or animal powered systems.
      > Regards,
      > Yaj.
      >
      > --- On Sun, 11/21/10, varaahan <offtown@... <offtown%40gmail.com>>
      > wrote:
      >
      > From: varaahan <offtown@... <offtown%40gmail.com>>
      > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Water source
      > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: Sunday, November 21, 2010, 2:43 PM
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I am planning to have a borewell of 6 " dia. upto a depth of 50 ft. There
      > is no electric power available. Plz suggest any other method to draw water
      > for my farm.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Raju Titus
      Dear friend, I was using 13 HP for irrigation and reduced it up to 1HP and using it only in Half ekad and trying to stop irrigation in farming.This is possible
      Message 2 of 15 , Nov 21, 2010
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        Dear friend,
        I was using 13 HP for irrigation and reduced it up to 1HP and using it only
        in Half ekad and trying to stop irrigation in farming.This is possible by
        fukuoka way of farming.Use of irrigation is unnatural and is not
        sustainable. Water is coming up in the form of vapour and condensed in the
        form of dues. Green cover helps in this natural way.
        Thanks
        Raju

        On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 2:43 PM, varaahan <offtown@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > I am planning to have a borewell of 6 " dia. upto a depth of 50 ft. There
        > is no electric power available. Plz suggest any other method to draw water
        > for my farm.
        >
        >
        >



        --
        Raju Titus. Hoshangabad. 461001.India.
        +919179738049.
        http://picasaweb.google.com/rajuktitus<http://picasawebalbum.google.com/rajuktitus>
        fukuoka_farming yahoogroup


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Boovarahan Srinivasan
        Will it work on the hot climate of Tamilnadu ? Of course one can minimise the use of water by providing green cover and using the moist method of farming but
        Message 3 of 15 , Nov 22, 2010
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          Will it work on the hot climate of Tamilnadu ?
          Of course one can minimise the use of water by providing green cover and
          using the moist method of farming but still a minimum amount of water may be
          required.

          Boovarahan S

          On Mon, Nov 22, 2010 at 10:51 AM, Raju Titus <rajuktitus@...> wrote:

          > Dear friend,
          > I was using 13 HP for irrigation and reduced it up to 1HP and using it only
          > in Half ekad and trying to stop irrigation in farming.This is possible by
          > fukuoka way of farming.Use of irrigation is unnatural and is not
          > sustainable. Water is coming up in the form of vapour and condensed in the
          > form of dues. Green cover helps in this natural way.
          > Thanks
          > Raju
          >
          > On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 2:43 PM, varaahan <offtown@...> wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > I am planning to have a borewell of 6 " dia. upto a depth of 50 ft. There
          > > is no electric power available. Plz suggest any other method to draw
          > water
          > > for my farm.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > Raju Titus. Hoshangabad. 461001.India.
          > +919179738049.
          > http://picasaweb.google.com/rajuktitus<
          > http://picasawebalbum.google.com/rajuktitus>
          > fukuoka_farming yahoogroup
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Boovarahan Srinivasan
          The land is clayey and people get just one crop a year between November to February ( rain / winter season). Afterwards the land is kept dry as water supply is
          Message 4 of 15 , Nov 22, 2010
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            The land is clayey and people get just one crop a year between November to
            February ( rain / winter season). Afterwards the land is kept dry as water
            supply is scarce. Installing a diesel pump may not be economically viable. I
            heard people drilling borewells upto 50 feet but water supply is not
            assured.

            Boovarahan S

            On Mon, Nov 22, 2010 at 10:40 AM, Ramki Bondada <bondada@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            >
            > It all depends on What is land suitable for? what are you planning to
            > cultivate in the land and what would be the irrigation requirements.
            >
            > Diesel engine set will pump water from upto 30 feet which is proven. May
            > assess this if it meets up your requirements.
            >
            > Ramki
            >
            >
            > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
            > From: offtown@... <offtown%40gmail.com>
            > Date: Sun, 21 Nov 2010 05:45:31 -0800
            > Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Water source
            >
            >
            > Both are beyond my reach. I may try rope pump but designing a guide box for
            > the rope pump is not easy.
            >
            > Boovarahan S
            >
            > On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 5:02 AM, yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...<yajnesh%40yahoo.com>>
            > wrote:
            >
            > >
            > >
            > > There are solar and wind powered pumps available. The other alternative
            > > would be human or animal powered systems.
            > > Regards,
            > > Yaj.
            > >
            > > --- On Sun, 11/21/10, varaahan <offtown@... <offtown%40gmail.com><offtown%
            > 40gmail.com>>
            > > wrote:
            > >
            > > From: varaahan <offtown@... <offtown%40gmail.com> <offtown%
            > 40gmail.com>>
            >
            > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Water source
            > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com><fukuoka_farming%
            > 40yahoogroups.com>
            >
            > > Date: Sunday, November 21, 2010, 2:43 PM
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > I am planning to have a borewell of 6 " dia. upto a depth of 50 ft. There
            > > is no electric power available. Plz suggest any other method to draw
            > water
            > > for my farm.
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Frank McAvinchey
            If your land is NOT flat, but hilly, you could instead create a series of little lakes, or ponds, where the water is captured high up and goes down hill
            Message 5 of 15 , Nov 22, 2010
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              If your land is NOT flat, but hilly, you could instead create a series of
              little lakes, or ponds, where the water is captured high up and goes down
              hill diagonally from pond to pond. There is a man in Austria who has become
              famous for his version of natural farming. He has done exactly that with
              the creation of ponds which hold water all year long, creating oases of life
              around which he plants his crops. He uses livestock to fertilize his
              farmland, and the results are stupendous, excellent. His name is Sepp
              Holzer, and here is a video you can watch of him and his farm in Austria -

              <object width="960" height="745"><param name="movie" value="
              http://www.youtube.com/v/LjbBoIDeBOQ?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00"></param><param
              name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess"
              value="always"></param><embed src="
              http://www.youtube.com/v/LjbBoIDeBOQ?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00"
              type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always"
              allowfullscreen="true" width="960" height="745"></embed></object>

              If you look for Sepp Holzer on YouTube, you'll find many videos talking
              about him. If you don't speak English, perhaps there is someone there who
              can translate for you???

              Best of everything to you!

              Frank

              On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 8:45 AM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>wrote:

              >
              >
              > Both are beyond my reach. I may try rope pump but designing a guide box for
              > the rope pump is not easy.
              >
              > Boovarahan S
              >
              >
              > On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 5:02 AM, yajnesh shetty <yajnesh@...<yajnesh%40yahoo.com>>
              > wrote:
              >
              > >
              > >
              > > There are solar and wind powered pumps available. The other alternative
              > > would be human or animal powered systems.
              > > Regards,
              > > Yaj.
              > >
              > > --- On Sun, 11/21/10, varaahan <offtown@... <offtown%40gmail.com><offtown%
              > 40gmail.com>>
              > > wrote:
              > >
              > > From: varaahan <offtown@... <offtown%40gmail.com> <offtown%
              > 40gmail.com>>
              >
              > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Water source
              > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com><fukuoka_farming%
              > 40yahoogroups.com>
              >
              > > Date: Sunday, November 21, 2010, 2:43 PM
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > I am planning to have a borewell of 6 " dia. upto a depth of 50 ft. There
              > > is no electric power available. Plz suggest any other method to draw
              > water
              > > for my farm.
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jason Stewart
              Mr. Sepp Holzer makes recognition, not as a natural farmer, nor a genuinely sustainable farmer, nor in the terms of late Mr. Fukuoka sensei (shizen nōhō
              Message 6 of 15 , Nov 22, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Mr. Sepp Holzer makes recognition, not as a natural farmer, nor a genuinely
                sustainable farmer, nor in the terms of late Mr. Fukuoka sensei (shizen nōhō
                自然農法 nature farming ways) - not at all, to be clear for all readers. Please read
                in the files of the group's page the article "The Sustainability Myth". His
                works clearly do not accord with late Mr. Fukuoka sensei's clear principles,
                documented explanations and motivations at all. If you need i can't quote late
                Mr. Fukuoka sensei's words describing clearly what Sepp Holzer and similar
                practises do wrong and do so very unsustainably.
                Soil, hydrology and topography does not sum up to a resource designed by humans
                at all, -conceit-, as if it's some sort of human painting or sculpture. Sepp
                Holzer is wrong!


                Best wishes to you Frank, and to all.

                Jason
                S.E. Oz



                ________________________________
                From: Frank McAvinchey <fmcavin@...>
                To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 9:24:36
                Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Water source

                If your land is NOT flat, but hilly, you could instead create a series of
                little lakes, or ponds, where the water is captured high up and goes down
                hill diagonally from pond to pond. There is a man in Austria who has become
                famous for his version of natural farming. He has done exactly that with
                the creation of ponds which hold water all year long, creating oases of life
                around which he plants his crops. He uses livestock to fertilize his
                farmland, and the results are stupendous, excellent. His name is Sepp
                Holzer, and here is a video you can watch of him and his farm in Austria -

                <object width="960" height="745"><param name="movie" value="
                http://www.youtube.com/v/LjbBoIDeBOQ?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00"></param><param

                name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess"
                value="always"></param><embed src="
                http://www.youtube.com/v/LjbBoIDeBOQ?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00"

                type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always"
                allowfullscreen="true" width="960" height="745"></embed></object>

                If you look for Sepp Holzer on YouTube, you'll find many videos talking
                about him. If you don't speak English, perhaps there is someone there who
                can translate for you???

                Best of everything to you!

                Frank

                On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 8:45 AM, Boovarahan Srinivasan <offtown@...>wrote:

                >
                >
                > Both are beyond my reach. I may try rope pump but designing a guide box for
                > the rope pump is not easy.
                >
                > Boovarahan S
                >
                >
                > On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 5:02 AM, yajnesh shetty
                ><yajnesh@...<yajnesh%40yahoo.com>>
                > wrote:
                >
                > >
                > >
                > > There are solar and wind powered pumps available. The other alternative
                > > would be human or animal powered systems.
                > > Regards,
                > > Yaj.
                > >
                > > --- On Sun, 11/21/10, varaahan <offtown@...
                ><offtown%40gmail.com><offtown%
                > 40gmail.com>>
                > > wrote:
                > >
                > > From: varaahan <offtown@... <offtown%40gmail.com> <offtown%
                > 40gmail.com>>
                >
                > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Water source
                > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                ><fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com><fukuoka_farming%
                > 40yahoogroups.com>
                >
                > > Date: Sunday, November 21, 2010, 2:43 PM
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > I am planning to have a borewell of 6 " dia. upto a depth of 50 ft. There
                > > is no electric power available. Plz suggest any other method to draw
                > water
                > > for my farm.
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                ------------------------------------

                Yahoo! Groups Links





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jason Stewart
                Just what i wrote! And further does saying carefully spelled and worded: * no thing *, clarify any thing for you! ________________________________ From:
                Message 7 of 15 , Nov 22, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  Just what i wrote!
                  And further does saying carefully spelled and worded: * 'no thing' *, clarify
                  any thing for you!



                  ________________________________
                  From: Frank McAvinchey <fmcavin@...>
                  To: Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...>
                  Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 16:31:59
                  Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Water source

                  So what do you REALLY think? :}

                  Frank


                  On Mon, Nov 22, 2010 at 7:19 PM, Jason Stewart <macropneuma@...> wrote:

                  Mr. Sepp Holzer makes recognition, not as a natural farmer, nor a genuinely
                  sustainable farmer, nor in the terms of late Mr. Fukuoka sensei (shizen nōhō
                  自然農法 nature farming ways) - not at all, to be clear for all readers. Please read
                  in the files of the group's page the article "The Sustainability Myth". His
                  works clearly do not accord with late Mr. Fukuoka sensei's clear principles,
                  documented explanations and motivations at all. If you need i can't quote late
                  Mr. Fukuoka sensei's words describing clearly what Sepp Holzer and similar
                  practises do wrong and do so very unsustainably.
                  >Soil, hydrology and topography does not sum up to a resource designed by humans
                  >at all, -conceit-, as if it's some sort of human painting or sculpture. Sepp
                  >Holzer is wrong!
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Best wishes to you Frank, and to all.
                  >
                  >
                  >Jason
                  >S.E. Oz
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  ________________________________
                  From: Frank McAvinchey <fmcavin@...>
                  >
                  >To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                  >Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 9:24:36
                  >
                  >Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Water source
                  >
                  >
                  >If your land is NOT flat, but hilly, you could instead create a series of
                  >little lakes, or ponds, where the water is captured high up and goes down
                  >hill diagonally from pond to pond. There is a man in Austria who has become
                  >famous for his version of natural farming. He has done exactly that with
                  >the creation of ponds which hold water all year long, creating oases of life
                  >around which he plants his crops. He uses livestock to fertilize his
                  >farmland, and the results are stupendous, excellent. His name is Sepp
                  >Holzer, and here is a video you can watch of him and his farm in Austria -
                  >
                  ><object width="960" height="745"><param name="movie" value="
                  >http://www.youtube.com/v/LjbBoIDeBOQ?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00"></param><param
                  >
                  >
                  >name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess"
                  >value="always"></param><embed src="
                  >http://www.youtube.com/v/LjbBoIDeBOQ?fs=1&hl=en_US&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00"
                  >
                  >
                  >type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always"
                  >allowfullscreen="true" width="960" height="745"></embed></object>
                  >
                  >If you look for Sepp Holzer on YouTube, you'll find many videos talking
                  >about him. If you don't speak English, perhaps there is someone there who
                  >can translate for you???
                  >
                  >Best of everything to you!
                  >
                  >Frank
                  >
                  >On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 8:45 AM, Boovarahan Srinivasan
                  <offtown@...>wrote:
                  >
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Both are beyond my reach. I may try rope pump but designing a guide box for
                  >> the rope pump is not easy.
                  >>
                  >> Boovarahan S
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 5:02 AM, yajnesh shetty
                  >><yajnesh@...<yajnesh%40yahoo.com>>
                  >
                  >> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> > There are solar and wind powered pumps available. The other alternative
                  >> > would be human or animal powered systems.
                  >> > Regards,
                  >> > Yaj.
                  >> >
                  >> > --- On Sun, 11/21/10, varaahan <offtown@...
                  >><offtown%40gmail.com><offtown%
                  >> 40gmail.com>>
                  >> > wrote:
                  >> >
                  >> > From: varaahan <offtown@... <offtown%40gmail.com> <offtown%
                  >
                  >> 40gmail.com>>
                  >>
                  >> > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Water source
                  >> > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                  >><fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com><fukuoka_farming%
                  >
                  >> 40yahoogroups.com>
                  >>
                  >> > Date: Sunday, November 21, 2010, 2:43 PM
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> > I am planning to have a borewell of 6 " dia. upto a depth of 50 ft. There
                  >> > is no electric power available. Plz suggest any other method to draw
                  >> water
                  >> > for my farm.
                  >> >
                  >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >> >
                  >>
                  >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >------------------------------------
                  >
                  >Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Vargan
                  ... Brad Lancaster from Arizona develops the method of rainwater harvesting based on the experience of a farmer from Zimbabwe. He has nice web-site with many
                  Message 8 of 15 , Nov 23, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "varaahan" <offtown@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I am planning to have a borewell of 6 " dia. upto a depth of 50 ft. There is no electric power available. Plz suggest any other method to draw water for my farm.
                    >

                    Brad Lancaster from Arizona develops the method of rainwater harvesting based on the experience of a farmer from Zimbabwe. He has nice web-site with many resources - http://www.harvestingrainwater.com/ "Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond".
                    Regards,
                    Vargan,
                    Rusia.
                  • seaseal
                    Bicycle-powered pumps are also improving. These do require human energy but have become very efficient. Good luck with your farm. Cecile seaseal@got.net Coming
                    Message 9 of 15 , Nov 23, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Bicycle-powered pumps are also improving. These do require human
                      energy but have become very efficient. Good luck with your farm.

                      Cecile

                      seaseal@...

                      Coming together is a beginning,
                      staying together is progress, and
                      working together is success.



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Jason Stewart
                      Mr. Sepp Holzer wrong. He was violently fighting his personally-made-up-war against Mother-nature (called Ecocide). Pretending to grow more than he killed when
                      Message 10 of 15 , Nov 23, 2010
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Mr. Sepp Holzer wrong. He was violently fighting his personally-made-up-war
                        against Mother-nature (called Ecocide). Pretending to grow more than he killed
                        when in fact he killed more than what grew itself under his violence to the
                        land, Mother Nature. According to some Permacult-leading-activists themselves,
                        even much worse destruction of Mother-nature than permacult's-own-destroying of
                        Mother-nature, under their made-up-beliefs of Mother-Nature-domination.
                        He makes his own recognition, not as a nature/natural farmer at all, nor a
                        genuinely sustainable farmer at all, nor in the terms of late Mr. Fukuoka
                        sensei's nature farming ways (shizen nōhō 自然農法) at all -- not at all, to be
                        clear, for all readers.
                        Please read in the files of the group's page the article "The Sustainability
                        Myth".
                        His works clearly do not accord with late Mr. Fukuoka sensei's clear principles,
                        documented explanations and motivations, at all.
                        If you need i can quote directly from late Mr. Fukuoka sensei's words describing
                        clearly what Sepp Holzer and similar practises do wrong, and do so very
                        unsustainable.

                        Soil, hydrology and topography does not sum up to a resource designed by humans
                        at all, -conceit-, as if it's some sort of human painting or sculpture. Sepp
                        Holzer is wrong!

                        Please read here in this group in 2001, from Georg who describes himself as
                        "founding chairman of the national [Austrian] pc association", writing about his
                        & Austria's attention towards the subject of, Sepp Holzer, via Jamie:
                        From:
                        -> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/fukuoka_farming/message/36
                        "
                        ...but have appended a
                        response by georg parlow on the pc list that casts some light on Sepp
                        Holzer

                        souscayrous



                        ...as i am one of the main pc activists here in austria (founding chairman of
                        the national pc association), i am double-minded about sepp holzer. i love it
                        that he is able to get all the media exposure and the term "permaculture"
                        receives part of the attention. however, i am wary about the fact, that in my
                        opinion it is not permaculture what he is doing, and i am afraid that sooner or
                        later this will show and discredit permaculture.

                        sepp holzer is a genius in his way. he really knows his turf (in the litteral
                        sense of the meaning), he successfully threw out everything he learned about
                        agriculture (also no book about organic farming, permaculture etc. has ever
                        spoiled his approach until 1997, when eva vesovnik visited his farm and said
                        "but this is permaculture you are doing!" - he might heave read something since,
                        mainly so he knows what words to use for marketing reasons), he goes and boldly
                        tries every idea he has, and he is a marketing genius.

                        sepps strongest assets (besides his marketing skills) are the intimate knowledge
                        of the farm he grew up on, to pay attention to his microclimates, warm air
                        currents and all sorts of things he observes and notices there, to come up with
                        the most creative explanations for his observances, and to go ahead with action
                        based on his observances and explanations.

                        all this could make him a great permaculturist. now let me explain why i think
                        it is not permaculture, what he is doing there:

                        care for the earth? honestly i am not sure about that. the natural climax
                        vegetation of the region is almost pure pine. sepp digs in 10 meter high "bad
                        pine monoculture" with the bulldozer, turns them into huge "raised beds", plants
                        tiny fruit trees on them, and sows them with jerusalem artichokes, radishes and
                        (voluntary) stinging nettle. naturally the herbs go rampant on the exessive
                        nutrients and the radishes are fist-big, which is "a prove for the superiority
                        of permaculture".

                        2 or 3 years ago he had a landslide above his farmhouse, and 1 foot of mud in
                        all rooms. the landslide was caused by a broken dam of his design and doing -
                        there isnt any design, really, and never was. there is only lots of ideas
                        applied - some great idaes, some meaningless, some stupid ones - and
                        unfortunately sepp holzer isnt into small experiments - he seems to like big
                        things and knows how to operate his bulldozer.

                        care for the people? sharing of the surplus? thumbs down. besides his close
                        family, the only person he cares for seems to be his lawyer - indirectly. nearly
                        everyone i have heard of who has had any closer dealings with him has been sued
                        or at least threatened with a suit (if he hears about my opinion about him i
                        will certainly get sued). in wintertime he is said to cherish the old austrian
                        farmers-tradition of going to court with his neighbours. i have not heard so far
                        of him ever moving an eyelash without asking money for it. while i know of
                        functioning pc systems that really give away wheelbarrows of food for free (e.g.
                        peter bird on W.A.), if sepp says "people come to pick my cherries" you can be
                        sure that they pay for it - big time. if permaculture is about subsistance life,
                        and subsistance grows on local and regional cooperation, sepp holzer is as far
                        from it as you can get.

                        please note that this is my private opinion as an individual, and not the
                        position of the austrian permaculture association.

                        kind regards
                        georg
                        "

                        Everyone, lose the violence, and the mind-games war -gammon- trying blame the
                        violence on other people.


                        Really best wishes to you Frank, and to all.

                        Jason
                        S.E. Oz



                        ________________________________
                        From: Frank McAvinchey <fmcavin@...>
                        To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2010 9:24:36
                        Subject: Re: [fukuoka_farming] Water source

                        If your land is NOT flat, but hilly, you could instead create a series of
                        little lakes, or ponds, where the water is captured high up and goes down
                        hill diagonally from pond to pond. There is a man in Austria who has become
                        famous for his version of natural farming. He has done exactly that with
                        the creation of ponds which hold water all year long, creating oases of life
                        around which he plants his crops. He uses livestock to fertilize his
                        farmland, and the results are stupendous, excellent. His name is Sepp
                        Holzer, and here is a video you can watch of him and his farm in Austria -



                        [cut]


                        Best of everything to you!

                        Frank



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