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Re: The Road Back To Nature by Masanobu Fukuoka

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  • Vargan
    Masanobu Fukuoka wrote in the book The Road Back To Nature Thomas was a young Dutchman who had stayed at my farm for three years a while back. Upon
    Message 1 of 44 , Aug 8, 2010
      Masanobu Fukuoka wrote in the book "The Road Back To Nature"

      "Thomas was a young Dutchman who had stayed at my farm for three years a while back. Upon returning to Holland, he spent a year traveling around the country and teaching people how to set up home vegetable gardens. This worked out well and became quite popular, which helped convince the banks to loan him the funds he needed to set up a natural farm.

      I had once told him that the pond in a Japanese garden should be dug in the shape of the Japanese character for heart. I don't recall whether I heard this somewhere myself or stumbled upon it on my own, but that is how 1 built my garden at home. If you dig a garden in this shape, then the pond is wider at certain points, leaving some areas floating free like islands. What you have then is water flowing downstream, a pool, a sea, and islands. I told Thomas, "If one patterns it after the character for heart, then even a novice can make a pond." Thomas returned to Holland and traveled about the country, instructing people to take up a spade and dig up their lawns in the shape of hearts. In this way, high and low ground is created, so you have mountains, rivers, and valleys. When water is made to flow from the left side of the "heart," this immediately gives a Japanese pond. A garden can be created in this way without requiring the services of a gardener".

      This remains a bit unclear for me what Fukuoka-san meant. What should be arranged in the form of Japanese hieroglyph "heart" in the garden? And how will the pond be formed in this design?

      Regards,
      Vargan
      the Urals, Rusia
    • Jason
      Dear friend Yugandhar, You & all are welcome for the quote i re-typed from Fukuoka Masanobu sensei s (translation into English by Frederich P. Metraud in
      Message 44 of 44 , Aug 8, 2010
        Dear friend Yugandhar,

        You & all are welcome for the quote i re-typed from Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's (translation into English by Frederich P. Metraud in 1987).

        Please what do you say about this Sanskrit word: "asaṃskṛta", and
        please how do you write it in Sanskrit characters, and in Hindi and in any more Indian languages you care to do it in;
        Please what do you translate it to in English
        (- big words in English? big words they're fine, please bring them on!)
        This is a friendly !trick! question from me :) and not a joke, serious as well.

        I know this meaning in Japanese characters, Chinese characters, Tibetan, Korean characters, and about it from, for example, Taoism, and i know this above romanised sanskrit rendering of it.

        Please my wish is for you to re-translate it directly to English from this Sanskrit: "asaṃskṛta" (romanised) and do write it in the real Sanskrit characters for us all too please.

        Also we all can easily use encoding Unicode UTF-8 to display the characters.

        Humbly i hope that this simple act will help us all with Fukuoka Masanobu sensei's understanding. i keep the suspense of the 'secret' until your reply with the translation, for those who don't already know!... .


        Biggest best wishes,

        Jason
        S.E. Australia

        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Yugandhar S <s.yugandhar@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear Friend Jason,
        > Many many thanks for taking the task of typing those two pages by hand.
        > Love your work.
        >
        > Best Regards
        > Yugandhar
        >
        > On Fri, Aug 6, 2010 at 9:45 PM, Jason <macropneuma@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > G'day friend Yugandhar and all,
        [all sniped]
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