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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Chickens

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  • Tony prashad
    Pamela- Hi,Sorry to hear about the chickens ruining your yard. I do believe the owner will have to create a coup for them. They should not be allowed to spoil
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 27 7:29 PM
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      Pamela- Hi,Sorry to hear about the chickens ruining your yard. I do believe the owner will have to create a coup for them. They should not be allowed to spoil your crops and designs.
      I am trying to raise chickens according to rules and regulations created in different communities, based on a growing enrollment in urban agriculture studies across North America. If you are interested, the facebook site of the Canadian Liberated Urban Chicken Klub, or CLUCK will provide you with some helpful insight which you could share with your neighbour if they are interested, for example, of a good coop design or even link up with others discussing these issues.
      We are all for dialogue,
      Hope to hear from you, and please check if there are other critters around adding to the damage, cause I for a fact know that chickens can create a mess if left to run free. I restrict the chickens from accessing to certain parts of my yard.
      Good Luck.
       
      Tony Prashad
      Montgomery Community Garden Member
      Canadian Liberated Urban Chicken Klub Member
      Community Garden Liaison - Calgary Food Policy Council
      Chair - Calgary Food Policy Council
      Facebook: Tony Prashad
      Yahoo: blurail@...

      --- On Mon, 7/26/10, Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...> wrote:


      From: Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...>
      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Chickens
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Received: Monday, July 26, 2010, 6:51 AM


       



      I need help protecting my plants from the neighbor's chickens.

      They are hurting front yard plants where a fence would not look good.

      There are some long neglected rhododendrons that need help now. I am watering
      and mulching and cutting back ivy.

      My next door neighbor has 3 chickens who roam loose around the neighborhood.

      They are making a mess of our garden.
      * *
      Now that it is dry, they zero in on the watered area around the rhodies,
      digging holes about 4 inches deep directly next to the trunk, thus
      harming the feeder roots.

      They disturb the mulch anywhere I put it, on any plants. They are uprooting
      chickweed and other plants and trampling plants.
      My neighbors may never do anything to restrain the chickens. We
      just moved here about a month ago and I do not have a sense of the neighborhood
      dynamics. I want to live in harmony with my neighbors.

      I have put a pallet on one side of the rhody and some heavy stones
      on the other side of the trunk, with mulch underneath all of them.

      I want to plant many new plants, and am discouraged by the behavior
      of these chickens who appear ready to mess up new plantings and many of my
      plans for this space.

      They do not peck where I have mulched with blackberry canes that I
      cut back.

      Do you know of ways to repel chickens from digging near the plants?

      Are the chickens valuable in a home garden in some way?

      I live in Portland, Oregon where it is legal to keep 3 chickens. I
      will find out the laws - surely it is not OK for chickens to wreck their
      neighbors plants.

      We have a large yard in a quarter of an acre lot.

      My plan is to develop a permaculture design and create a space for
      people to learn about permaculture and wild edible plants.

      Thanks a lot for any suggestions that you have.

      Happiness, Health, Peace and Abundance for All!

      Many Blessings,
      Pamela Melcher










      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • trpowell2
      Pamela, Sounds like you already have some ways of discouraging the chickens from scratching around your plants with the stones, pallets, and blackberry canes.
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 27 9:35 PM
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        Pamela,

        Sounds like you already have some ways of discouraging the chickens from scratching around your plants with the stones, pallets, and blackberry canes.

        Google Northern Tool Supply. They have a sprinkler on a motion sensor that turns on when it detects movement. It is made for deer but should work with chickens, since they do not like being sprayed!

        Get a dog, a medium sixe one, and train it to stay on the property and bark at, but not attack, the chickens.

        Try sprinkling red pepper powder around the plants...works for deer...might work for chickens too.

        Pay a neighborhood kid to sit there and squirt the chickens when they come on the property. They will give up eventually.

        Just some ideas...be creative.

        Chicken manure is very high in nitrogen. It will help break down your mulch/compost faster than anything. It is very valuable in the growing world. Feel lucky you are getting it for free!

        If all else fails, build some nesting box and entice them to lay their eggs there...at least you will get eggs out of it.

        I am speaking from experience. I have 53 laying hens, 42 broilers, and 19 Capons currently on farm. They are all true free range and run amongst 6 acres of permaculture ground consisting of pumpkins, corn, artichoke, watermelons, cucumbers, and forested pasture.

        Hope you find away that works for you.

        Thomas Powell
        Real Food Farms
        El Dorado, California


        --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, Tony prashad <blurail@...> wrote:
        >
        > Pamela- Hi,Sorry to hear about the chickens ruining your yard. I do believe the owner will have to create a coup for them. They should not be allowed to spoil your crops and designs.
        > I am trying to raise chickens according to rules and regulations created in different communities, based on a growing enrollment in urban agriculture studies across North America. If you are interested, the facebook site of the Canadian Liberated Urban Chicken Klub, or CLUCK will provide you with some helpful insight which you could share with your neighbour if they are interested, for example, of a good coop design or even link up with others discussing these issues.
        > We are all for dialogue,
        > Hope to hear from you, and please check if there are other critters around adding to the damage, cause I for a fact know that chickens can create a mess if left to run free. I restrict the chickens from accessing to certain parts of my yard.
        > Good Luck.
        >  
        > Tony Prashad
        > Montgomery Community Garden Member
        > Canadian Liberated Urban Chicken Klub Member
        > Community Garden Liaison - Calgary Food Policy Council
        > Chair - Calgary Food Policy Council
        > Facebook: Tony Prashad
        > Yahoo: blurail@...
        >
        > --- On Mon, 7/26/10, Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > From: Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...>
        > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Chickens
        > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
        > Received: Monday, July 26, 2010, 6:51 AM
        >
        >
        >  
        >
        >
        >
        > I need help protecting my plants from the neighbor's chickens.
        >
        > They are hurting front yard plants where a fence would not look good.
        >
        > There are some long neglected rhododendrons that need help now. I am watering
        > and mulching and cutting back ivy.
        >
        > My next door neighbor has 3 chickens who roam loose around the neighborhood.
        >
        > They are making a mess of our garden.
        > * *
        > Now that it is dry, they zero in on the watered area around the rhodies,
        > digging holes about 4 inches deep directly next to the trunk, thus
        > harming the feeder roots.
        >
        > They disturb the mulch anywhere I put it, on any plants. They are uprooting
        > chickweed and other plants and trampling plants.
        > My neighbors may never do anything to restrain the chickens. We
        > just moved here about a month ago and I do not have a sense of the neighborhood
        > dynamics. I want to live in harmony with my neighbors.
        >
        > I have put a pallet on one side of the rhody and some heavy stones
        > on the other side of the trunk, with mulch underneath all of them.
        >
        > I want to plant many new plants, and am discouraged by the behavior
        > of these chickens who appear ready to mess up new plantings and many of my
        > plans for this space.
        >
        > They do not peck where I have mulched with blackberry canes that I
        > cut back.
        >
        > Do you know of ways to repel chickens from digging near the plants?
        >
        > Are the chickens valuable in a home garden in some way?
        >
        > I live in Portland, Oregon where it is legal to keep 3 chickens. I
        > will find out the laws - surely it is not OK for chickens to wreck their
        > neighbors plants.
        >
        > We have a large yard in a quarter of an acre lot.
        >
        > My plan is to develop a permaculture design and create a space for
        > people to learn about permaculture and wild edible plants.
        >
        > Thanks a lot for any suggestions that you have.
        >
        > Happiness, Health, Peace and Abundance for All!
        >
        > Many Blessings,
        > Pamela Melcher
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Frank McAvinchey
        Pamela, Perhaps you should join forces with your neighbor, taking him under your wing (pardon the pun, I couldn t help myself), as it were. If you begin to
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 28 6:44 AM
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          Pamela,

          Perhaps you should join forces with your neighbor, taking him under your
          wing (pardon the pun, I couldn't help myself), as it were. If you begin to
          seek HIS advise on how he raises chickens, get some of your own, and then,
          later raise the topic of how to keep them out of certain area, I think that
          will go a long way toward good relations with your neighbor. Maybe HE has
          ways of keeping them out of certain areas? I like the auto-sprinkler idea.
          The dog idea will probably tick off your neighbor before it is over with.
          Dogs eat chickens with relish (not pickle relish, usually they like more of
          a chutney with their chickens). Tact is the word of the day. I have
          neighbors who moved into MY neighborhood after I had been there, alone, for
          several years. They built a subdivision next to my property and now are
          telling ME what I can do with MY property. Not a good way to start a
          relationship.

          My favorite poet, Robert Frost, put it this way, "Good fences make good
          neighbors". Good advise.

          Frank

          On Wed, Jul 28, 2010 at 12:35 AM, trpowell2 <trpowell2@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Pamela,
          >
          > Sounds like you already have some ways of discouraging the chickens from
          > scratching around your plants with the stones, pallets, and blackberry
          > canes.
          >
          > Google Northern Tool Supply. They have a sprinkler on a motion sensor that
          > turns on when it detects movement. It is made for deer but should work with
          > chickens, since they do not like being sprayed!
          >
          > Get a dog, a medium sixe one, and train it to stay on the property and bark
          > at, but not attack, the chickens.
          >
          > Try sprinkling red pepper powder around the plants...works for deer...might
          > work for chickens too.
          >
          > Pay a neighborhood kid to sit there and squirt the chickens when they come
          > on the property. They will give up eventually.
          >
          > Just some ideas...be creative.
          >
          > Chicken manure is very high in nitrogen. It will help break down your
          > mulch/compost faster than anything. It is very valuable in the growing
          > world. Feel lucky you are getting it for free!
          >
          > If all else fails, build some nesting box and entice them to lay their eggs
          > there...at least you will get eggs out of it.
          >
          > I am speaking from experience. I have 53 laying hens, 42 broilers, and 19
          > Capons currently on farm. They are all true free range and run amongst 6
          > acres of permaculture ground consisting of pumpkins, corn, artichoke,
          > watermelons, cucumbers, and forested pasture.
          >
          > Hope you find away that works for you.
          >
          > Thomas Powell
          > Real Food Farms
          > El Dorado, California
          >
          > --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>,
          > Tony prashad <blurail@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Pamela- Hi,Sorry to hear about the chickens ruining your yard. I do
          > believe the owner will have to create a coup for them.� They should not be
          > allowed to spoil your crops and designs.
          >
          > > I am trying to raise chickens according to rules and regulations created
          > in different communities, based on a growing enrollment in urban agriculture
          > studies across North America. If you are interested, the facebook site of
          > the Canadian Liberated Urban Chicken Klub, or CLUCK will provide you with
          > some helpful insight which you could share with your neighbour if they are
          > interested, for example, of a good coop design or even link up with others
          > discussing these issues.
          > > We are all for dialogue,
          > > Hope to hear from you, and please check if there are other critters
          > around adding to the damage, cause I for a fact know that chickens can
          > create a mess if left to run free. I restrict the chickens from� accessing
          > to certain parts of my yard.
          > > Good Luck.
          > > �
          >
          > > Tony Prashad
          > > Montgomery Community Garden Member
          > > Canadian Liberated Urban Chicken Klub Member
          > > Community Garden Liaison - Calgary Food Policy Council
          > > Chair - Calgary Food Policy Council
          > > Facebook: Tony Prashad
          > > Yahoo: blurail@...
          > >
          > > --- On Mon, 7/26/10, Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > From: Pamela Melcher <dancingcedar@...>
          >
          > > Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Chickens
          > > To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com <fukuoka_farming%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > Received: Monday, July 26, 2010, 6:51 AM
          > >
          > >
          > > �
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > I need help protecting my plants from the neighbor's chickens.
          > >
          > > They are hurting front yard plants where a fence would not look good.
          > >
          > > There are some long neglected rhododendrons that need help now. I am
          > watering
          > > and mulching and cutting back ivy.
          > >
          > > My next door neighbor has 3 chickens who roam loose around the
          > neighborhood.
          > >
          > > They are making a mess of our garden.
          > > * *
          > > Now that it is dry, they zero in on the watered area around the rhodies,
          > > digging holes about 4 inches deep directly next to the trunk, thus
          > > harming the feeder roots.
          > >
          > > They disturb the mulch anywhere I put it, on any plants. They are
          > uprooting
          > > chickweed and other plants and trampling plants.
          > > My neighbors may never do anything to restrain the chickens. We
          > > just moved here about a month ago and I do not have a sense of the
          > neighborhood
          > > dynamics. I want to live in harmony with my neighbors.
          > >
          > > I have put a pallet on one side of the rhody and some heavy stones
          > > on the other side of the trunk, with mulch underneath all of them.
          > >
          > > I want to plant many new plants, and am discouraged by the behavior
          > > of these chickens who appear ready to mess up new plantings and many of
          > my
          > > plans for this space.
          > >
          > > They do not peck where I have mulched with blackberry canes that I
          > > cut back.
          > >
          > > Do you know of ways to repel chickens from digging near the plants?
          > >
          > > Are the chickens valuable in a home garden in some way?
          > >
          > > I live in Portland, Oregon where it is legal to keep 3 chickens. I
          > > will find out the laws - surely it is not OK for chickens to wreck their
          > > neighbors plants.
          > >
          > > We have a large yard in a quarter of an acre lot.
          > >
          > > My plan is to develop a permaculture design and create a space for
          > > people to learn about permaculture and wild edible plants.
          > >
          > > Thanks a lot for any suggestions that you have.
          > >
          > > Happiness, Health, Peace and Abundance for All!
          > >
          > > Many Blessings,
          > > Pamela Melcher
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lucia
          ... I agree. putting up a fence around your property is the easiest way. not cheap, depending on how large your property is. I have chickens and I fence off
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 28 11:11 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            On Wed, 2010-07-28 at 09:44 -0400, Frank McAvinchey wrote:

            > My favorite poet, Robert Frost, put it this way, "Good fences make good
            > neighbors". Good advise.

            I agree. putting up a fence around your property is the easiest way. not
            cheap, depending on how large your property is. I have chickens and I
            fence off what I don't want them to get into, like my garden. but, that
            said, they do provide wonderful manure and composting! so I do let them
            into the garden in the fall, when everything is harvested and it's time
            to apply a little natural fertilizer and tilling.

            -lucia
          • Greg and Garbo
            We have the same trouble with chickens and peacocks on our farm. To protect our patio garden, we used a very light and nearly invisible plastic netting
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 28 12:22 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              We have the same trouble with chickens and peacocks on our farm. To protect
              our patio garden, we used a very light and nearly invisible plastic netting
              available at Farm and Fleet and many garden shops. It is very light weight
              and can be draped over plants, of in our case held up with a few sticks. It
              is cheap and will last a few seasons, if used with care and stored over
              winter.

              The poultry avoid it and it protects the plants very well. Since it is
              nearly invisible in certain light conditions, care should be taken to make
              sure humans can see it and not trip on it.
              Greg



              On 7/28/10 1:11 PM, "Lucia" <lucia@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > On Wed, 2010-07-28 at 09:44 -0400, Frank McAvinchey wrote:
              >
              >> > My favorite poet, Robert Frost, put it this way, "Good fences make good
              >> > neighbors". Good advise.
              >
              > I agree. putting up a fence around your property is the easiest way. not
              > cheap, depending on how large your property is. I have chickens and I
              > fence off what I don't want them to get into, like my garden. but, that
              > said, they do provide wonderful manure and composting! so I do let them
              > into the garden in the fall, when everything is harvested and it's time
              > to apply a little natural fertilizer and tilling.
              >
              > -lucia
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Frank McAvinchey
              Aaaaaaamen! ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 28 12:24 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Aaaaaaamen!

                On Wed, Jul 28, 2010 at 2:11 PM, Lucia <lucia@...> wrote:

                >
                >
                > On Wed, 2010-07-28 at 09:44 -0400, Frank McAvinchey wrote:
                >
                > > My favorite poet, Robert Frost, put it this way, "Good fences make good
                > > neighbors". Good advise.
                >
                > I agree. putting up a fence around your property is the easiest way. not
                > cheap, depending on how large your property is. I have chickens and I
                > fence off what I don't want them to get into, like my garden. but, that
                > said, they do provide wonderful manure and composting! so I do let them
                > into the garden in the fall, when everything is harvested and it's time
                > to apply a little natural fertilizer and tilling.
                >
                > -lucia
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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