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Re: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Paddy farming in weeds

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  • Nandan Palaparambil
    In India cent is a measure of area, 100 cent being 1 acre, forgot that communicating with the global community...   This grass is a mixture of many
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 12 9:46 AM
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      In India cent is a measure of area, 100 cent being 1 acre, forgot that communicating with the global community...
       
      This grass is a mixture of many varieties...there is crab grass, touch-me-not and lot more..In two years of non-cultivation, nature started with some tree saplings also !!!
       
      Under the grass I could see the ground is soft, so the grass growth has improved the land, but to start the cultivation, grass is a problem..
       
      It is a news to me that Fukuoka san also used animals to keep the weeds down. This happened in this field also, once or twice some body let loose some sheep and the care taker person of my farm was telling me that helped to control the grass.
       
       
      Regards,
      Nandan
       


      --- On Sat, 6/12/10, Tom Gibson <camaspermaculture@...> wrote:


      From: Tom Gibson <camaspermaculture@...>
      Subject: [fukuoka_farming] Re: Paddy farming in weeds
      To: fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, June 12, 2010, 8:49 PM


       




      To say your paddy is 60 cents is a non-sequiter. 60 cents is 6/10 of a
      dollar not something to do with land.

      What kind of grass is this that you are trying to get rid of? Is this a
      low growing lawn grass or 8 foot tall jungle grass? Is it a knotty
      running grass with rhizomes that run underdround or does it only spread
      itself by seed? If the ground is hard then you might need to plow deeply
      to get a crop and release the fertility of the soil in which case I
      would have plowed the grass in and planted a cover crop immediately to
      suppress weed growth and provide additional organic matter.

      Moving from one type of cultivation to another is a transition process
      and the steps taken are unique to each site and clime. If you can flood
      your paddy at will, then flood it long enough to suppress weeds while
      rice is getting established but not long enough to kill clover or some
      other legume that is fixing nitrogen and suppressing weed growth. The
      goal is to keep something growing at all times so the organic material
      starts the natural soil building process which deposits organic matter
      on top of the soil, creating new soil, in a continuous process.

      The state of mind mentioned means to be aware of the natural tools at
      your disposal and use them to help you without fighting against the the
      way things are. If you have a lot of pests then it is because you grew a
      lot of pests. Try to understand how you did that if you wanted a
      different result.

      Make sure that you are building complete ecosystems. Remember that
      Fukuoka always employed animals to help keep the bugs and weeds down and
      to clean up the harvest so there was a more rapid breakdown of organic
      matter making planting and growing crops easier and more productive.

      Tom Gibson
      www.camaspermaculture.org <http://www.camaspermaculture.org>
      --- In fukuoka_farming@yahoogroups.com, "Nandan" <p_k_nandanan@...>
      wrote:
      >
      >
      > My paddy field is around 60 cents and it has not been cultivated for
      the last 2 years. Grass has been growing for the last 2 years and
      nothing was done on the field. Grass is too thick and so cleared it
      completely and moved it to one side and is planning to till it lightly
      and then start the cultivation. The grass is piled up on one side and is
      planning to put some cow dung so that it will decompose faster and then
      will spread it on the field once again..
      >
      > While reading the one straw revolution, hit on the following statement
      ..
      >
      > "In making the transition to this kind of farming, some weeding,
      composting or pruning may be necessary at first, but these measures
      should be gradually reduced each year. Ultimately, it is not the growing
      technique which is the most important factor, but rather the state of
      mind of the farmer"..
      >
      > the last sentence is not very clear here..
      >
      > Hope that next time, I may be able to avoid the tilling..Any data in
      terms of time frame to get into complete no-till paddy farming?
      >
      >
      >
      > Regards,
      > Nandan
      >

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    • Tom Gibson
      Sheep will all but kill the grass if left to overgraze. Tom www.camaspermaculture.org [Non-text portions of this message
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 15 9:44 AM
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        Sheep will all but kill the grass if left to overgraze.



        Tom

        <http://www.camaspermaculture.org/> www.camaspermaculture.org



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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