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Re: C. odorata removal

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  • Tom Gibson
    This site gives some information about a variety of methods that have been tried to control this weed. http://www.issg.org/database/species/ecology.asp?si=47
    Message 1 of 2 , May 6, 2010
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      This site gives some information about a variety of methods that have been
      tried to control this weed.
      http://www.issg.org/database/species/ecology.asp?si=47
      <http://www.issg.org/database/species/ecology.asp?si=47&fr=1&sts> &fr=1&sts=




      In the US goats and pigs have been successfully used to control and remove
      large tracts of weeds like leafy spurge. Since this plant is edible, just
      not as desirable, you might look at limiting animals like these into an area
      so they will be more inclined to remove it. Some companies have formed in
      the US that rent goats to clear brush. "Rent-A-Ruminant" is the name of one
      of them. Since there may not be much interest in owning goats in India for
      any other reason maybe this is a business opportunity.



      Another possible control method is fast cover crops like buckwheat that will
      grow fast and thick and crowd most other plants out. Then as the flowers
      start to mature and before the weeds have a chance to flower the whole thing
      is tilled under. You can do this as often as every six weeks. This depletes
      the weed seed bank, builds up organic matter in the soil and releases
      nutrients that may have been locked up. Buckwheat is particularly good at
      freeing the bonds that most soils have for phosphorous making it available
      to plants.



      Tom

      <http://www.camaspermaculture.org/> www.camaspermaculture.org



      Contact your <http://www.house.gov/> U. S. Representative and ask that they
      become a cosponsor of and support:

      H.R. 4971: <http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-4971>
      Greening Food Deserts Act

      H.R. 4607: <http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-4607>
      Healthy Food for Healthy Schools Act of 2010





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Frank McAvinchey
      Very interesting, Tom. I am about to plant some Buckwheat here in Ohio. We ll see what happens. We don t have that weed here, but rather others. Frank ...
      Message 2 of 2 , May 6, 2010
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        Very interesting, Tom. I am about to plant some Buckwheat here in Ohio.
        We'll see what happens. We don't have that weed here, but rather others.

        Frank

        On Thu, May 6, 2010 at 6:46 PM, Tom Gibson <camaspermaculture@...>wrote:

        >
        >
        > This site gives some information about a variety of methods that have been
        > tried to control this weed.
        > http://www.issg.org/database/species/ecology.asp?si=47
        > <http://www.issg.org/database/species/ecology.asp?si=47&fr=1&sts>
        > &fr=1&sts=
        >
        > In the US goats and pigs have been successfully used to control and remove
        > large tracts of weeds like leafy spurge. Since this plant is edible, just
        > not as desirable, you might look at limiting animals like these into an
        > area
        > so they will be more inclined to remove it. Some companies have formed in
        > the US that rent goats to clear brush. "Rent-A-Ruminant" is the name of one
        > of them. Since there may not be much interest in owning goats in India for
        > any other reason maybe this is a business opportunity.
        >
        > Another possible control method is fast cover crops like buckwheat that
        > will
        > grow fast and thick and crowd most other plants out. Then as the flowers
        > start to mature and before the weeds have a chance to flower the whole
        > thing
        > is tilled under. You can do this as often as every six weeks. This depletes
        > the weed seed bank, builds up organic matter in the soil and releases
        > nutrients that may have been locked up. Buckwheat is particularly good at
        > freeing the bonds that most soils have for phosphorous making it available
        > to plants.
        >
        > Tom
        >
        > <http://www.camaspermaculture.org/> www.camaspermaculture.org
        >
        > Contact your <http://www.house.gov/> U. S. Representative and ask that
        > they
        > become a cosponsor of and support:
        >
        > H.R. 4971: <http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-4971>
        > Greening Food Deserts Act
        >
        > H.R. 4607: <http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h111-4607>
        > Healthy Food for Healthy Schools Act of 2010
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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