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Dealing with Locust Shoots

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  • inan mayis aru
    Hi Eveybody, We are planning to build a timber house in our village in Biga, Turkey. There was a small locust grove on the site we are planning to build the
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 3, 2010
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      Hi Eveybody,

      We are planning to build a timber house in our village in Biga, Turkey. There was a small locust grove on the site we are planning to build the house. We cut down the trees for construction material. But locust is a vigorous plant, its twigs are shooting forth everywhere and they are hard to deal with. Villagers told us to apply a chemical called "green-drier" but I don't want to use any chemicals in my land. We have our vegetable garden and orchard close-by. Do you know any natural means to deal with those locust twigs? Thank you very much.

      Mayis

      ----------------------------------------------------------
      www.karakusi.org
      www.gecitsizgecit.blogspot.com





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Frank McAvinchey
      Dear Mayis, The easiest way to remove them is with a backhoe. That is a tractor with an excavating arm on the back end. If you could find someone in your
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 4, 2010
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        Dear Mayis,

        The easiest way to remove them is with a backhoe. That is a tractor with an
        excavating arm on the back end. If you could find someone in your village
        who knows how to drive one, or if you know... Perhaps you could rent such a
        machine there? Those trees don't naturally die easily, they are strong! We
        have them here as well, or at least we have two kinds of trees called
        locusts here. I am researching them because the wood is very resistant to
        rot. We have two sorts in America here that grow very straight trunks,
        which are great for building things. We have termites here, and they eat
        everything, if it's not preserved. I would rather use wood that they won't
        eat than poisonous, preserved wood.

        You are right, there is NO reason to use chemicals on your land,
        contaminating it. You are doing good, my friend.

        Frank

        On Sat, Apr 3, 2010 at 6:48 AM, inan mayis aru <mayissurec@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > Hi Eveybody,
        >
        > We are planning to build a timber house in our village in Biga, Turkey.
        > There was a small locust grove on the site we are planning to build the
        > house. We cut down the trees for construction material. But locust is a
        > vigorous plant, its twigs are shooting forth everywhere and they are hard to
        > deal with. Villagers told us to apply a chemical called "green-drier" but I
        > don't want to use any chemicals in my land. We have our vegetable garden and
        > orchard close-by. Do you know any natural means to deal with those locust
        > twigs? Thank you very much.
        >
        > Mayis
        >
        > ----------------------------------------------------------
        > www.karakusi.org
        > www.gecitsizgecit.blogspot.com
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ross.gigee
        Build a fire over the stumps. Or, I think goats will eat locust, too, if you have goats. People always comment on my Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) about how
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 5, 2010
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          Build a fire over the stumps. Or, I think goats will eat locust, too, if you have goats.

          People always comment on my Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) about how hard it is to get rid of when it's cut down. My answer is: Why should I get rid of it? The goats love it, so I carry it to the goat yard. This makes much more effective use of space than merely having an herbaceous pasture. It's a pasture in 3-d.

          Thanks for not using herbicide.
          Ross
        • Frank McAvinchey
          Good idea, the fire! I like goats. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 5, 2010
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            Good idea, the fire! I like goats.

            On Mon, Apr 5, 2010 at 12:40 PM, ross.gigee <rgigee@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > Build a fire over the stumps. Or, I think goats will eat locust, too, if
            > you have goats.
            >
            > People always comment on my Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) about how hard it
            > is to get rid of when it's cut down. My answer is: Why should I get rid of
            > it? The goats love it, so I carry it to the goat yard. This makes much more
            > effective use of space than merely having an herbaceous pasture. It's a
            > pasture in 3-d.
            >
            > Thanks for not using herbicide.
            > Ross
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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